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Question about Survival...

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posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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Say you know a lot of head knowledge about survival but not a ton of practice. Except for maybe a once building a lento and sleeping in the woods over night. What would be your chances of survival? Like for example I tried making fire one time with a bow and spindle. I got it very hot to the touch but couldn't make fire. So my thought is, although I know enough, I have not a lot of practice. So if I was say put to the test could I survive? I know I'd be better off than like 95% of people out there but still. Anyone got any advice?




posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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reply to post by r2d246
 


Buy a lighter.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:16 AM
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reply to post by r2d246
 



Prepping the right way for true survival,9/3/2012
it has a lot of good post
its a thread some one started in the survival list
good luck



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:16 AM
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reply to post by r2d246
 


You can try to bug out for a few days once a month and try to be self sufficient. No cheating and driving to the store or going to your friends house for a cold shower.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:59 AM
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Don't worry about it, if you find yourself in a real scenario where your life depends of it, you'll make a nice fire. A man under pressure can do unexpected things.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 02:03 AM
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reply to post by r2d246
 


Hell, you've just descibed the majority of the leadership in the Army. (I can't speak on the other services behalf)

We are now promoting politicians rather than leaders. But that's just my opinion after 30+ years of experiance.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 03:17 AM
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The rotating spindle must be the hardest wood you can find, the bottom flat piece of wood must be quite soft, so that it heats up quickly, plus you should have plenty of 'tinder' ready.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 04:37 AM
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PRACTICE... go out and go camping... have some good camping equipment available and have a nice weekend, but practice building a fire.. next time, make a shelter... actually try one of those water purifiers... when in season... go hunting.

Once your skills are developed... take a weekend and actually rough it...knife, rope, axe, a little dry food and see what happens

That's why the Army practices... we play like we practice... go practice.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 09:47 AM
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You don't know enough to survive, that much I can guarantee you. It takes years of practice to learn all the skills required to live in the bush for extended periods of time.
You're much better off to have a good B.O.B. ready along with water filter, knife, fire making implements and a book on wild edible plants.
Taking a class on survival skills will at least give you some practice along with someone who can point out the mistakes you are making.
Overconfidence will get you killed faster than anything in the woods.

Check the link in my signature about bow drill firemaking.
edit on 7-9-2012 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 02:28 PM
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Here is something that might help put things into perspective for you.

I have a unique vantage point in this regard. I spend a lot of time helping wild animals get back to their natural habitat, usually after injury or interference from human activity. Well adapted animals like deer, osprey, etc. that have many of their survival skills hardwired in by instinct have about a 50% chance of survival in their first year given a normal situation. When motherless fawns are placed back in the wilderness, despite their built in skills, without the mentorship and constant teachings of the parent that survival rate is significantly jeopardized.

I'm always struck when people in the forums here start discussing their favorite survival books as if having it along is going to be the key to their survival. Being a nature freak, immersed in it every other day, slowly walking through it, trying to understand even a small part of all the complex relationships that make it work as a whole I realize that even with the amount of knowledge I have compared to most others it would still be an extreme hardship to accomplish sustainability. I started off with books. I would cary my favorite edible plants guide wherever I went, try to identify and eat enough food to keep me from starving. After years of this it is still not easy. Every time I go out, several times a week, I am constantly practicing or at least observing and learning about how to live with grace in what was once our natural home. I am constantly refining what I take along with me and making mental notes of what skills I should be researching next. I have even been in the odd survival situation myself. It's gotten to the point now that I have become the unofficial expert in my community and interest groups now invite me to do presentations and classes. Still, will I be ok when life next catches me by surprise?

With that I give you this advice. Go into nature. Walk slowly. Be quiet. Watch and learn what goes on there. Learn to appreciate it's value. You will fall in love with this mysterious place, full of life that these days you can pretty much call your own. And with that you will want to learn how to make it your home (or at least a second home). Take some books. Ask yourself "What is that interesting looking tree? Is it edible? Is it useful? What animal left that obvious track? or made that crazy sound?" Eventually you will be asking about the not so interesting and obvious plants and animals. And at that point you will begin to stand out from those who only think they are connecting with nature when they are in a paved campground with their motor-mansion, loud generator, satellite TV, and tearing through what little forest we have left on their ATVs.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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Most people are more prepping for natural disaster and civil war scenarios lasting a year or two than for long term wilderness survival. Its easier to prep for the first group by just stocking up on food and ammo. For the second group, most people would die because there just aren't that many resources out there, definitely not enough for everyone. the best prepared would be current farmers for either I would say.

For me i try to prep for both, but realistically I would have a hard time gathering enough food with all the people in my area and the limited resources that would quickly occur.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by r2d246
 


SURVIVAL OR NOT RELYS WITH YOUR RESOLVE AND WILL.

THERE ARE TWO STORIES I TELL TO MY STUDENTS, ONE OF A US PILOT THAT AFTER A MALFUNCTION HE HAD MADE AN EMERGENCY LANDING ON AN ABOANONED STRIP IN ALASKA THINKING NO ONE HAD HEARD HIS DISTRESS CALL WITHIN MINUTES OF LANDING HE PULLED HE'S SERVICE PISTOL AND SHOT HIMSELF FATALY, THIS MAN HAD TRAINING AND RESOURCES TO SURVIVE BUT NO RESOLVE OR WILL, HELP ARIVED 2 HOURS AFTER HIS DEPARTURE

SECOND A MAN DRIVING THROUGH THE DESERT SUFFERED A BREAK DOWN SOMEWHERE NEAR DEATH VALLEY AND AFTER WALKING A VERY LONG TIME I THINK IT WAS 4 DAYS HE FOUND HIS SALVATION, THIS MAN HAD NO TRAINING NO EQUIPMENT WHEN FOUND HE SAID THE ONLY THING THAT KEPT HIM GOING WAS THE FACT HE WAS GOING THROUGH A DIVOURCE AND HE WOULD NOT LET HER GET EVERYTHING, HE HAD WILL AND RESOLVE

YOU MAY HAVE BEEN CLOSER TO STARTING THAT FIRE THAN YOU THINK
STUDY THE CUIRCUMSTANCES AND LEARN FROM YOUR FAILINGS FOR IF YOU LEARN FROM IT THEN IT WAS NOT A FAILURE BUT A LESSON

BEING SMART AS DEFINED BY ME IS YOUR WILLINGNESS AND ABILITY TO LEARN
KNOWLEDGE IS WHAT IS GAINED
FOR DUMB PEOPLE KNOW THE WORLD IS FLAT AND CAN NOT LEARN
edit on 8-9-2012 by MetalGear1 because: NO REASON GIVIN



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 12:13 AM
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Originally posted by AlreadyGone
PRACTICE... go out and go camping... have some good camping equipment available and have a nice weekend, but practice building a fire.. next time, make a shelter... actually try one of those water purifiers... when in season... go hunting.

Once your skills are developed... take a weekend and actually rough it...knife, rope, axe, a little dry food and see what happens

That's why the Army practices... we play like we practice... go practice.


This is no joke. About a month ago I went out. I found the most amazing camp spot in the back woods. I pitched my tent and stuff. I'm eating dinner and I hear a noice, look over and there's a giant grizzly about 50 ft away eating berrys or something.

OHHH MANN. It was nuts!!! I haven't even seen a bear in the wild in many many years. So I grabbed what I could and creeped into the woods away from the bear. So there I was getting eaten alive by misquitos. I had only shorts and t shirt on. It was awful! And I was paniced etc etc. so after an hr it finally cleared away


OR SO I THOUGHT...

I went into the tent and was trying to sleep. It was getting dark out. Then I heard a wolf howell!! I was like "was that a wolf???" and then again it howelled!!! and I was like "oh crap it is and it's not far away either!!!"

So I had had it. I just grabbed what i could hand started back to the car threw the dark woods. So I'm half way and I hear the bear again near by. Like I was concerned it might have been following me as it wasn't far at all.

After that incident I realized that there is a chance you could die if you're not careful. With no gun and no way to protect yourself you're basically fair game. It was a good learning experience. I still go camping though but I think you have to pick your spots carefully.

Once you get into the back woods there really is preditors that will have you for dinner and find you too. It's scary. ha ha ;-p



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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I posted a thread on survival and prepping just a couple of days ago, Prepping the right way for true survival.

My best advice to you is practice, practice, practice. You don't have to go into the bush to practice your survival skills, you can practice many of the skills such as fire starting, shelter building, food preserving and prepping, and water purification right in your backyard.

As a previous poster stated, you may have been closer than you think to starting your fire. When starting a fire with a fire bow the trick is to get the base hot enough that it will ignite very small pieces of tinder not the base wood. A great tinder that is light and compact to Carr for emergencies is dryer lint, itcan be put into vacuum seal bags and will take up very little space.



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 11:11 PM
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I think it's gonna be more urban survival in a dooms day scenario than anything anyway.



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by r2d246
Say you know a lot of head knowledge about survival but not a ton of practice. Except for maybe a once building a lento and sleeping in the woods over night. What would be your chances of survival? Like for example I tried making fire one time with a bow and spindle. I got it very hot to the touch but couldn't make fire. So my thought is, although I know enough, I have not a lot of practice. So if I was say put to the test could I survive? I know I'd be better off than like 95% of people out there but still. Anyone got any advice?


I started Teaching Winter Survival at the age of 17 or 16? I did this in scouts. At the age of 18 I was Teaching Men and I was trained by my Grandfather since I was a child. I eventually taught...Winter, Ocean, Mountain, Jungle, Arctic and a few other forms of survival. I am a Highly Trained Diver, Martial Arts Practitioner, Trained in Weapons of all types, Archery, Trapper....etc.

Most people do not realize how difficult it is to survive in Cold Temps. Also...I would suggest that you purchase a Swiss Army Knife and always have it on you. Starting a fire is paramount and it is a lot easier to create a spark from striking a Flint type stone against a metal Blade. Water is important and always drink from a flowing stream not a still pond. Shelter is something you should read up on and also read up on various forms of Animal Traps and Snares as well as how to create a Fish Trap. Read up on edible plants but unless you are an expert...be careful about mushrooms as you can be dead very quickly.

Always follow streams or rivers down stream as they will get you to people. There is much to this so I would recommend purchasing an Army Field Guide at a Surplus Store. Split Infinity



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 11:57 PM
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reply to post by SplitInfinity
 


Wow sounds like you know your stuff! Okay let me get your take on this, since you know what you're talking about....Well I have this idea I've been formulating. I guess there's no harm in sharing it. I bought a small wall tent, and camp stove. Got each for 50 bucks, like stellar deal! So since I live in Canada my plan was to set them up somewhere deep in the woods near a remote lake and near a stream running into the lake. I haven't found a lake yet that I'd do this at. But eventually I was thinking of doing this. And then getting some basic gear up there. Just some cheap stuff. Then using it as my BOL, and part time get away cabin. A permanent structure would be nice but then you need all kinds of permits and if you don't have all that and then anyone found it they might wreck it or burn it down, plus you can't relocate it. So I was thinking it's a good idea just in case of an emergency. Also the wall tent could be taken down, folded up and stashed. So in case the zombie apocolypse breaks out, I'll bug out to my bol and hang there while the SHTF. ha ha ;-) What do you think of this idea?

edit on 8-9-2012 by r2d246 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 12:40 AM
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reply to post by r2d246
 

CANADA...OH MAN! Snow can be your friend or enemy. Plus the COLD is...well...YOU KNOW! The problem with a Tent is that...although it is good short term...get a Heavy Snow Storm and BAM! You could find yourself buried and unless you spend some money...a cheap tent will not stop the Rain from swamping you.

Depending on how far North you are...an IGLOO is the way to go! I have built them and they are warm plus the Dome Structure is very strong like an BRICK ARC! I have spent 30 days in Arctic Weather and the amount of calories you burn in cold weather is enormous! Plus you have to deal with Bears and....BEARS...and...BEARS!

Food should NEVER BE KEPT IN A TENT! Tie them in a bag or cloth on a line...if you can get IVY or GRAPE VINES...that will work. Throw the Food over a double thin branch where two trees branches come together. A BEAR will climb a tree and rip off the branch but if it does this and the second thin branch will not allow the food to fall...they give up because of all the energy they wasted climbing the first tree.

I always carry a 50 cal Handgun as well as a 50 Cal bolt action Rifle in Bear Country. Anything less just pisses them off! Be sure you are not set up close to trees that could collapse from heavy snowfall as well as if it is Spring...keep distance from the Stream as a Warm Day can turn that stream into a Flash Flood Zone. Buy Arctic Calibrated Boots as well as have a pair of Waders for going into water to set up Fish Traps. You get wet...YOU DIE! Face Masks are a MUST and multiple gloves for both inside the tent...Hunting and buy DIVERS GLOVES AND A THIN COLD WATER WET SUIT. You will need a medical kit as well as a Machete, Axe, Shovel....actually...if you KNOW you are going to be there...read a Cold Environment Army Guide. The DIVERS GLOVES and SUIT are my Idea as I am a Diver and the Groves will protect your hands plus provide the dexterity needed to perform complex acts in water.

I do not recommend you even attempt to do this unless properly trained! I am an EXPERT and it is tough for me! Because of the COLD you will need to Hunt and know how to Dress an Elk or Deer or Boar...etc. Once you make a KILL in COLD WEATHER...every animal and ESPECIALLY BEARS will be on their way right at you so you need to leave some meat and quickly take what you can carry. Building a Sled and having Snow Shoes are mandatory. When Humans are in numbers there is a level of safety but a person by themselves is easy prey and even if you shoot a Bear in the Heart...as the skull tends to deflect even a 50 Cal round...their adrenaline keeps them on attack even though they are really dead. Do me a FAVOR and don't do this. It takes YEARS of Training to live in COLD WEATHER Bear Country. They can be right next to you in the bush and you will not know it. If it is winter and they are out instead of Hibernating...it means they are STARVING and will go after you. I am a CRACK SHOT and I am beyond WELL TRAINED...still I would not want to be doing this by myself. I have done so to pass a course but all the other times I was part of the Training Staff and we taught and checked up on the guy's DAILY. A person without Training and in COLD WEATHER in confrontation with a BEAR that is starving will be a FIGHT TO THE DEATH! Or...you could be walking through some low brush by a stream and a Bear in Winter would ambush you. You would have no time to shoot. Split Infinity



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 04:55 AM
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"The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in combat" The key is to train constantly, since you mentioned fire starting start out with a lighter and all the materials ready, then start making it more difficult until you are starting from scratch and fabing up whatever you need.



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by SplitInfinity
 


Ya I understand what you're saying. But people adapt to there climates and situations. And generally speaking you got just as good a chance to win the lotto as you do getting attacked by a bear or wolf. They'll generally run away, That's not coming from inexperience. I've gone hunting, hiking, camping etc probably hundreds of times. Mostly in my younger years too. And we'd walk in the cut lines in the back woods for miles and miles where there are bears and wolves and stuff. And at that age you'd be easier pickings for them if they just happened to attack every time.

I was int he back country a month ago and a big grizzly walked up to my tent. It didn't attack. It just sat there eating it's berries. And I had enough space to slowly walk away. But that's the first time I even seen a bear in the wild in like 15 years. There definitely hard to come by.

I'm not like a totally green city slicker. I have grown up in cities only. But I've done tons of outdoors stuff. It doesn't scare me really. Also cold weather is something you aclimatize to. Perfect example, we set a record low about 3 ago in my city. It was -54f or -45c (no joke). That's pretty cold, but seriously for us it's nothing. It's only at that level of cold that you actually feel it because you're so use to winters that it's not that big a deal. We seem to react more to hot weather though. Like I was out biking the other day, it was only plus 27c out, so about 80f and I was sweating like a pig. It was nuts.

Also I'm just saying that would be a BOL not somewhere that I'd ever want to live long term. Probably the longest I'd ever go there would be a week, but if there was ever a real SHTF scenario then you might go there for longer.

Animals are afraid of human scent you know that. We went hunting. Caught a moose. But we needed to get some gear so we just laid my buddies sweaty shirt on top of the moose. We came back quite a few hours later and there was wolf tracks all over but they didn't eat the moose. They were too scared to get to close cuz of the shirt. I'm not saying it's always like that but it just goes to show.

But I think that if I set up the wall tent what I'd do is use logs to create a fencing around the base maybe 4 to 6 feet high. That would give me a bit more confort sleeping at night just in case something came up to the tent. Seems like deer often will wonder up to your tent in the middle of the night and then it freaks the crap out of you cuz all you hear are the foot steps and you don't know what it is. Anyway I got to run.

edit on 9-9-2012 by r2d246 because: (no reason given)





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