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A proposed telescope that will finally see the Apollo modules on the Moon!

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posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 06:35 AM
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the-colossus.com...
cs.astronomy.com...

Very little information on the Internet so far, but I have my fingers crossed it gets funding and goes ahead.




posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 06:43 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


We can already see the Apollo modules on the moon... and why does it matter anyway?

But yeah, it would be cool to have a telescope that big!



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 06:46 AM
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It's a waste of money. What about the telescopes already in orbit? Atmospheric turbulence is the reason why larger scopes on earth don't cut it.



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 06:51 AM
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They just have to launch fake landers up there first! Just kidding.....

Never seen telescope pics of the landers. Hubble cant do it.



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 06:55 AM
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reply to post by phroziac
 


There's a telescope 'bolted' onto the bottom of the lunar reconnaissance orbiter...



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 07:48 AM
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posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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The telescope will chiefly be used for observing exoplanets... if it is even built. Its resolution of objects on the Moon will be about 1.5 meters, If they do bother to photograph an Apollo landing site, the "experts" will proclaim them "fake."



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 08:02 AM
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We have telescopes that can bring distant objects into view (Hubble, anyone?).

But not frozen, 40yr old equipment?

Frankly? Not interested. How about a few grand in my bank account instead?



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
reply to post by wildespace
 

Here they are:

NASA Unveils New Detailed Photos of Apollo Moon Landing Sites


But that's from a lunar orbiter. I obviously meant a ground-based telescope. Obviously.



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 08:08 AM
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reply to post by DJW001
 


I agree, 100% But on the flip side, I would love to know what those anomalies on the moon, really are. This would be an Ideal Telescope, to view them.


Even though they have been reported from time to time for hundreds of years, claims of changes on the lunar surface have always been controversial. Many scientists have dismissed the occasional reported sightings of glows and mists hanging over certain lunar features. Now a French astronomer has obtained some of the best evidence yet that occasionally something does disturb the lunar surface. It was seen in 1992 by veteran lunar observer Audouin Dollfus of the Observatoire de Paris using the one metre (39 inch) Meudon reflecting telescope. He has only just finished analysing the results, and has submitted them for publication.


Lights glow on Moon



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 08:27 AM
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I'm really surprised this hasn't happened yet. Maybe Vegas can make a casino around this theme. Telescope always aimed at the landing sites. Nasa memorabilia everywhere. Can only dream.



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


OK -- I must have misunderstood you.

You are right in saying that it would be nice in general to have a ground-based telescope that is good enough to see the equipment on the Moon. However, there really is no huge need to do that specific task, considering we can get a better view from the LRO.


edit on 9/6/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: speellling, and. grammar



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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Atmospheric turbulence is the reason why larger scopes on earth don't cut it.
reply to post by RELDDIR
 

Not quite. We have Adaptive Optics that nullify atmospheric turbulence to some extent.
Building large telescopes on earth is still a good idea, and cheaper than sending them in orbit.



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by RELDDIR
It's a waste of money. What about the telescopes already in orbit? Atmospheric turbulence is the reason why larger scopes on earth don't cut it.



Keep up with the times ADAPTIVE OPTICS


Adaptive Optics



posted on Sep, 6 2012 @ 04:17 PM
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Hubble's quite a small telescope. It's real advantages are that being in space it doesn't have to look through all the dust and vapour in our atmosphere and it can see wavelengths that get filtered out by the atmosphere on Earth.

Hubble doesn't have the resolution to see Apollo artifacts on the Moon, it would have to be a much bigger 'scope. It's perfectly equipped for galaxies and nebulae though, despite being a long way away, they're surprisingly large objects in the sky... Just very dim.

The new Earth based telescope presumably won't need these advantages. With the adaptive optics it should be fine for exoplanets as long as it's placed at altitude.
edit on 6/9/12 by Insomniac because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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Why not close up views on the Moon's surface.
Many might reject another remote viewing as the moon satellite viewing looked shady.

Go from Earth orbit to the Moon in a capable rover with TV worldwide viewing.
Proving Moon landing capability is very important in carrying out further Newtonian
exploration of the universe. They should just give up if they can't do it.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by TeslaandLyne
 



Go from Earth orbit to the Moon in a capable rover with TV worldwide viewing.


They did that already. It was called Apollo.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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Originally posted by DJW001
reply to post by TeslaandLyne
 



Go from Earth orbit to the Moon in a capable rover with TV worldwide viewing.


They did that already. It was called Apollo.


Hey just trying to help out the non Apolloists.
You can't support going back just say so.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 03:23 PM
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Colossus my eye..........Given NASA's reputation for evil Cyclops is more like it..........



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by de_Genova
 



Colossus my eye..........Given NASA's reputation for evil Cyclops is more like it..........


It's not a NASA project, it's the brain child of a Canadian "Bill Gates."




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