School. My son is Failing some subjects. Should I worry?

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posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:06 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by OutonaLimb


He is doing well. He sees through the BS more than you. Life (for his ((and my
own sons)) sake) needs to take a whole new direction. An honest one.

Schooling is indoctrination for the masses. No more, no less.
And it will mean nothing soon, imo.

Teach him 9/11 was an (faked if you must know) inside job.
Teach him flouride and sugar are poison.
Teach him pure THC cures all forms of cancer within weeks...

I could go on...

Teach him how to defend himself and recognise liars.
Teach him how to attach little importance to money,
the importance of which the schools do nothing but teach.
Teach him that he must answer to no man, but himself.

Just my 2 cents, friend.
edit on 4-9-2012 by OutonaLimb because: (no reason given)


Ahh yes, lets fight indoctrination with indoctrination. Lets not teach our kids to critically think, lets tell them that our beliefs are fact, even if we cant prove it.

I weep for our children.


Teach is the key word here. Everything I have said is true, with all conclusions
reached based on critical thinking and solid evidence. I don't need to convince
anyone on these issues.

They will need to convince themselves, when the time comes.

Cry away captain, but save your tears for my child. He doesn't need them.
edit on 4-9-2012 by OutonaLimb because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:07 PM
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Originally posted by Pedro4077
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 





You are enabling your child, and teaching him a sense of entitlement. This is a bad thing.


No I am teaching him about hard work. Read an earlier post. He is turning 15, he can drive, weld, concrete, fence and many other hands on skills.


And do you think he will ever get a job as a welder if he can't figure angles? Good luck with that.

Do you think he will get a job laying concrete, if he cannot figure the area in which he will be laying said concrete? Good luck with that.

Do you think he will get a job as a fencer, if he cant figure out the amounts of material needed for said fence? Good luck with that?

Where the schools are failing is in not teaching kids what the real applications for these things are. Not in teaching them.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


I am teaching him what he needs to know. What he wants, to follow in the family tradition of Trade related work. That's about as far away from "Lazy" as you can get. I have worked in an office. It sucked.

I would never let him be a couch potato, if he want's to work at 15 then so be it.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by OutonaLimb
 


Teach is the key word here. Everything I have said is true, with all conclusions
reached based on critical thinking and solid evidence. I don't need to convince
anyone on these issues. They need to convince themselves, with a little nudge
from those who love them and have their best interests in mind.

Cry away captain, but save your tears for my child. He doesn't need them.

I'd ask you to prove what you said, but its pointless.

You are teaching him, not to figure out these ideas for himself, but to listen to what you have to say about them. And none of them have real life application.
edit on Tue Sep 4 2012 by Jbird because: Mod Note: Excessive Quoting – Please Review This Link



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by OutonaLimb
 


He knows about all this stuff you have pointed out. It's good to teach them about the corrupt system.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by Pedro4077
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


I am teaching him what he needs to know. What he wants, to follow in the family tradition of Trade related work. That's about as far away from "Lazy" as you can get. I have worked in an office. It sucked.

I would never let him be a couch potato, if he want's to work at 15 then so be it.


Good luck to him, getting into the trades, without an education. They will laugh him out the door.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by OutonaLimb
Teach him 9/11 was an (faked if you must know) inside job.
Teach him flouride and sugar are poison.
Teach him pure THC cures all forms of cancer within weeks...


So teach him fairytales, not facts. Most children grow out of fairytales, you apparently do not think they should!



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by FissionSurplus
I used to have a similar problem with my youngest child. ... So my husband said, "For every A you bring home, I'll give you $20. For every B, you get $10. C's and under get nothing." I was appalled by this approach, as I had always loved learning, but lo and behold, it worked. She went from failing grades to a 3.5 grade point average (A's and B's)....]


I think your husband is a wise man. After all, this is how society relates to education, more or less, on a practical basis.

Children should have a love of learning for its own sake, but they probably won't get it from school. Might as well level with them and let them know how the real world works and why formal education is important...it increases options and earning power.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by Pedro4077
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


I am teaching him what he needs to know. What he wants, to follow in the family tradition of Trade related work. That's about as far away from "Lazy" as you can get. I have worked in an office. It sucked.

I would never let him be a couch potato, if he want's to work at 15 then so be it.


Good luck to him, getting into the trades, without an education. They will laugh him out the door.


Have you ever gotten your hands dirty?

He has all the maths and english required for this type of work. I know - I have been there.




edit on 4-9-2012 by Pedro4077 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by Pedro4077

Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by Pedro4077
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


I am teaching him what he needs to know. What he wants, to follow in the family tradition of Trade related work. That's about as far away from "Lazy" as you can get. I have worked in an office. It sucked.

I would never let him be a couch potato, if he want's to work at 15 then so be it.


Good luck to him, getting into the trades, without an education. They will laugh him out the door.


Have you ever gotten your hands dirty?

He has all the maths and english required for this type of work. I know I have been there.



and not a company will touch him, with out an education. Or will you go to the interviews with him, and tell the boss that "hey, ive seen him, he's good"?
Nice attempt at reduction ad absurdem, btw.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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I do not know if anyone else has brought this up, but you can look at the title of your thread and make a determination as to whether your son needs schooling.

What is important to you? Your son getting a high school diploma or ending up in prison?
edit on 4-9-2012 by totallackey because: grammar



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:15 PM
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nevermind
edit on 4-9-2012 by Maroboduus because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


I don't think you have ever been to a construction job site. A young, strong enthusiastic 15yo will pick up an apprentiship long before an 18yo scholar. I know - I have been there.:



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by Pedro4077
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


I don't think you have ever been to a construction job site. A young, strong enthusiastic 15yo will pick up an apprentiship long before an 18yo scholar. I know - I have been there.:



more reducto ad absurdem. Well played.

I have been on many construction sites, not that its relevant. you can think he'll pick it up faster all you want....doesnt matter, as he wont get the chance, without an education.

again, why do you feel the need to justify this so hardily? Facts are facts, and the fact is, your child will have a MUCH harder time in life without proper education. You seem hellbent on allowing him to shrug it off.

And whats most sad, is that you child will be the one to pay for your mistakes.
edit on 4-9-2012 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by totallackey
I do not know if anyone else has brought this up, but you can look at the title of your thread and make a determination as to whether you son needs schooling.

What is important to you? Your son getting a high school diploma or ending up in prison?


Huh? Prison? Where did you get that from. He is strong and muscle bound for his age, but no thug. He enjoys doing what his father and Uncles do. Working with their hands and working on the land.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by Pedro4077
 


Nothing is 100 percent, but statistically speaking, the destination of young males without a high school diploma is prison. Of course, there are many other factors to consider...is the father/mother present in the home, are there drugs involved, mental health, etc...

The fact of the matter is this: The number one risk factor common to all incarcerated offenders is education.

Here is the list of annual reports for South Australia Corrections. You can do a google search and collect North, East, and West, if you like... Read the annual reports and let us know what you find...after 30 years in corrections, I can tell you what it will be...

How about the title of your thread? Any comment on that?
edit on 4-9-2012 by totallackey because: further content
edit on 4-9-2012 by totallackey because: punctuation



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Why do you keep on the "Without an Education" rabble. He has good maths and english as I have stated many times before. And another thing "Family Reputation" is huge in the Construction/Trade area.

Sometimes it's who you know that gets jobs. We are a very well known, hard working family in a town of 25 Thousand people. That's an immediate foot in the door for him.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by totallackey
I do not know if anyone else has brought this up, but you can look at the title of your thread and make a determination as to whether you son needs schooling.

What is important to you? Your son getting a high school diploma or ending up in prison?


The title of the thread means that I think I could do a better job of teaching him what he needs to know than the school. Should I worry? or should I just get him employment at 15.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by Pedro4077
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Why do you keep on the "Without an Education" rabble. He has good maths and english as I have stated many times before. And another thing "Family Reputation" is huge in the Construction/Trade area.

Sometimes it's who you know that gets jobs. We are a very well known, hard working family in a town of 25 Thousand people. That's an immediate foot in the door for him.


Good maths?

'Nuff said.

Good luck to your child. He's going to need it.
edit on 4-9-2012 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by Pedro4077
My son will be 15 soon. I have been teaching him to drive, fence, lay concrete, weld ect. He will most likely never be out of work. He has a head start on the others who obsess about perfect grades.


So basically what you're saying is that you'd rather him learn a "trade" rather than all this "fancy intellectual knowledge?" While well and good, and certainly there will usually be work (although how much competition) from these sorts of trades, what if he decides at a later date that he wants to do more, that he is tired of laying concrete?

What when the skills provided by education had been neglected and he finds himself in a the rut that many others following this mentality seem to find themselves? I have seen it far too often, and these people rarely rise above the manual toil to do anything else in their lives. Some do, but many do not. Some are happy and content, but not having the option or the opportunity to do much else after the opportunity, after the initial chance, is far too sad.

Also, i know how teens can been regarding education. I was the same, so were many others. I was always an A student, loved (still do) learning, but right around the time i was in high school (10th-11th grade), i said, "What's the point in all this." Some of my friends, some of the smartest people i knew, dropped out. Some become extremely successful; others didn't. I almost didn't graduate HS because of the teen angst and what's-the-point feelings i had. Luckily, i DID graduate. And after a couple years, went to college. And ended up studying things that i love. During this time, i worked construction, and i enjoyed it, but i did not want to be stuck in this because there was little opportunity to advance and become a business owner or be more than a manual day laborer.

All i can say is, the benefits from learning, getting decent grades, finishing school, etc, FAR outweigh--in the long run--not giving a crap and screwing up the only (easy) opportunity one is likely to get. Once the opportunity is done, and once one is grown and down, one might have trade skills, but one always needs the critical thinking and trivial knowledge provided by education for the future.

I cannot stress how important it is in the long run.

I have seen the effects of the negligence of education far too often, and it's that kind of "what the hell do i need to know that crap for" BS that is keeping people dumbed down and continuing the cycle of ignorance that keeps us even more enslaved.

My opinion, nothing else.
edit on 4-9-2012 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)





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