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African Honey Bee in Pennsylvania

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posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 02:51 PM
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Just though I would make this short and sweet as according to researchers, these suckers aren't capable of living this far north yet.

Well, after doing some pretty deep research, I'm 100% positive that what I saw today was an African Honey Bee in central PA. Whether or not it was on off shoot or some lost bee, or if the hives have spread this far due to the heat this year, is beyond me. I just know that I will be on extra guard for a hive nearby after this.

Definitely something to think about.




posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 02:55 PM
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What information has lead you to this conclusion?

My understanding is that their is no real physical difference between africanized and non-africanized honey bees. The predominate difference is behavioral.

Can you elaborate on any of your observations?
edit on 2-9-2012 by MDDoxs because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


They aren't the same as the killer bees?

Africanized bee | Wikipedia


Africanized honey bees, known colloquially as "killer bees," are some hybrid varieties of the Western honey bee species, (Apis mellifera), produced originally by cross-breeding of the African honey bee A. m. scutellata, with various European honey bees such as the Italian bee A. m. ligustica and the Iberian bee A. m. iberiensis. The hybrid bees are far more aggressive than any of the various European subspecies. Small swarms of Africanized bees are capable of taking over European honey bee hives by invading the hive and establishing their own queen after killing the European queen.[1]




Ugh! Run!
edit on 2-9-2012 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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If it was just one or a few , it (they) could have been hitchhikers. Maybe hitched a ride in a semi or something similar.



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


I am 100% certain I've seen those in the northeast including PA and NJ.
edit on 2-9-2012 by zonetripper2065 because: error



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by zonetripper2065
 


Would you please elaborate on what makes you 100% certain? Was it markings , behavior or what exactly makes you certain. I'm from that general area and I would really like to know.
edit on 9/2/2012 by bourbon2nite because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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My wife has raised bees for over ten years and even she can't ID an African bee from an Italian, Russian, or another variety. Unless they swarm, they're virtually identical.



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by Toromos
 


That is what I was thinking. I noticed I did not get a reply. Thanks



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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Then maybe I am misinformed.

This bee looked like a honey bee but was much larger, orange in color. I'd say it was about 1"-2" long. He was buzzing around a group of yellow jackets who all left when he came.

I checked out carpenter bees, definitely not one of those. Would have gotten a picture but I had no camera handy and it started pouring raining almost immediately and he was gone.

Very much looked like the bee here



Very fuzzy and like I said, quite orange. Looked like a Japanese giant hornet, but they usually don't have many fuzzies from what I can tell from pictures.

Any information would be appreciated.



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


A Japanese giant hornet looks nothing like the picture you just posted...you are all over the place with what you saw...



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by totallackey
 


I meant in terms of the orange color. Perhaps I should have been more specific.



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 04:33 PM
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several things it could be, queen honey bee or queen yellow jacket, both are around in the late summer early fall.



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


So it was orange...and fuzzy like a bee...



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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Did it look like this? By the way the site I directed you to allows for a thorough search to identify many types of insects.
edit on 2-9-2012 by totallackey because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


According to a long article from the Florida state (something or another) that I read recently, you cannot tell the African bees from domestic bees except by their aggressive behavior. They don't look any different than our European honey bees.



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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is it true honey bees don't really do much pollinating?

anyways, this is sad because honey bees used to be fat jolly harmless bees, now africanized they are loud and violent



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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Originally posted by gwydionblack
Then maybe I am misinformed.

This bee looked like a honey bee but was much larger, orange in color. I'd say it was about 1"-2" long. He was buzzing around a group of yellow jackets who all left when he came.

I checked out carpenter bees, definitely not one of those. Would have gotten a picture but I had no camera handy and it started pouring raining almost immediately and he was gone.

Very much looked like the bee here



Very fuzzy and like I said, quite orange. Looked like a Japanese giant hornet, but they usually don't have many fuzzies from what I can tell from pictures.

Any information would be appreciated.


Sounds like it may have been a bumblebee...





posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by totallackey
 


It was not that insect. Not entirely sure how that site works for identification.



reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 



Definitely was not bumble bee. There are hundreds of bumble bees around my home daily and this was not one of them. Nowhere close.




After doing further research, I believe I have found the culprit, though lack of information of size does lead me to more questions.



This is a red mason bee, which is practically identical to the bee I saw. Some information say that mason bees are the same size as honey bees or smaller. The few pictures/video I can find point in both directions - smaller and larger.

If someone can confirm that mason bees can get to be large in size, 1"-2", then I think I found the culprit. My father said he has seen them around very rarely in the past but they are hard to come by.



posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 03:24 AM
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reply to post by bourbon2nite
 


I lived there for 26 years. You'd really be surprised what kind of bugs can show up in certain areas and flourish in the humid summer. I worked at a lumber yard/landscape center and there I got a small hand experience with invasive species. In our live foliage shipments it was normal to find tarantulas and other odd spiders, pink praying mantis, Japanese hornets and small amphibians. The bees were in the crates of dry plant bulbs and in bundled hardwood.



posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 07:23 AM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


Sorry...I posted the wrong link...try this instead. Scroll to the bottom and you can select the search criteria.




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