Kettleball training

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posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 01:23 AM
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Looking for some info from anyone who has in the past or is currently doing kettleball training. I am thinking of starting this up.

Has it been effective for you?




posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by lcbjr1979
 


What’s your overall goal? Cardio, strength, weight loss, toning?



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 02:34 AM
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reply to post by BlindBastards
 


Right now my goal is weight loss. Once I get to the weight I want then I will try and add muscle



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 02:58 AM
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reply to post by lcbjr1979
 


I have used them in the past and still use them once or twice a week, just for quick sessions.

I use a 45lb because I want to keep muscle and strength but gain definition while losing a couple extra pounds here and there.

It works, but it depends on the types of workouts you do. High reps while using the kettlebell for different squats, front raises and clean presses (starting with it on the floor, picking it up to chest height, flipping it over and pressing above head) can really help lose some "all around" weight fast.

but you have to eat right with it as well. Keep up protein, cut down the carbs( some can be okay if strenuously working out), fats and cholesterol and it will significantly improve results. Drink as much water as you can a day!!! a gallon is the goal! It speeds up metabolism and keeps your body from retaining water (which will account for up to 5lbs that you lose quickly). It sounds counterproductive to ingest a bunch of heavy water, but your body is counterproductive. just like If you skip a meal, your body stores fat..go figure.

if you are trying to lose 20+ lbs, start with low weight and increase the reps (Ex: 4 sets x 25 reps)
Don't overdo it though, you'll be super sore and you'll want to quit if you go too hard.

I hope this helped some, and good luck!



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 03:25 AM
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reply to post by lcbjr1979
 


Okay, kettlebells are great for that and just all round strength and endurance and everything really. I use them regularly in conjunction with free weights, cardio and the fitball. The basic premise of kettlebell training is that you target multiple body parts in the one exercise. They build functional strength. They’re great for cardio/weight loss because generally you do two to four sets of up to 20 repetitions, or even more which really gets the heart pumping with short rests in between.

But the best thing you can do is go to a gym and go through it with a personal trainer to show you what’s what and correct form. When you first start it’s vital that you learn the basics and most importantly the correct form for the exercises. Otherwise you’re at significant risk of injury or just inefficiency. If you’re new to weight training then I wouldn’t recommend just looking at a few websites and trying to copy that on your own. Most good gyms will have kettlebell classes for all fitness levels and ages. A personal trainer will give you a taylor made program based on your experience, fitness level and overall goals. You need to build a base. The first week or two will be painful so don’t be discouraged by that. After a couple of weeks you won’t even be sore the next day. The first few months is when you notice the biggest transformation and as you progress you must step up your intensity. And then when you move onto strength training you’ll have an excellent base and again if you’re new to it certainly get a trainer or an experienced friend to take you through a few sessions and exercises. Strength training form is absolutely paramount as the risk of injury is far greater.

My advice to you is seek professional/experienced guidance and build your base, start slowly and take it easy for the first couple of weeks. Change up your routine regularly otherwise your body gets used to it too much and your results slow. Do a lot of stretching to improve flexibility as it will be needed with kettlebell training. Use the fit and medicine balls to build your core, which is also vital. Do a cardio session afterward, like the bike or treadmill. It’s always best to do that after a weights workout because you’ll need all your energy for it, but do a warm up on the treadmill for five minutes beforehand to get the blood pumping and the muscles warm. Drink lots of water and eat plenty of protein. Protein rich diet will fill you up and you won’t be hungry too often. Cut out the nonsense, refined carbs like chips and pasta. Sub things like white bread with wholemeal or multigrain. Normal pasta with wholemeal pasta. Everybody needs fat, but the good kind that is found in things like fish and nuts. Cut portion sizes or ideally if you have the time six small meals spread throughout the day is best. A healthy breakfast is of paramount importance.



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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reply to post by lcbjr1979
 


Kettleballs are really versatile, loads of exercises can be done with them, and they're good to start with. The main downside I found is you can't adjust the weight of them like you can with dumbbells so you may have to buy a full set (unless of course you have joined a gym). The amount of weight used for a squat is going to be massively different than a lateral raise (delt fly) for example.

edit on 1-9-2012 by polarwarrior because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 01:23 AM
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I like the bulgarian sandbag, they are easy to make,cheap,effective,and portable......I am 45 and ripped it only takes 15 minutesevery other day, with biking on off days.





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