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Will melting Arctic ice cap allow the formation of a polar anti-cyclone?

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posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 12:12 AM
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If the Arctic ice sheet melts, will this allow the formation of ocean currents in the Arctic ocean, and will they establish in the direction of the polar easterlies? Could such currents allow for the formation of an anti-cyclone over the north pole? If so, what features would it have? What effect would it have on the existing ocean currents and the thermohaline loop?

Below is a link to the NASA site about the most recent findings on the melting of ice in the Arctic.
I notice that the southern tips of the remaining ice cap are spiraled in a clockwise direction, which may suggest a current is being established. I think the thermohaline loop is in danger of loosing its' source either way.

www.nasa.gov...

M




posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 08:12 AM
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reply to post by morefiber
 


I'm surprised there aren't more replies to this thread. I think you pose some interesting questions. I have no answers about the establishment of an anticyclone, or it's effects, but I would sure be interested in seeing that, we have no history that has survived about what it is like when the ice is gone, kind of exciting imho. I think the next thing to happen will be a change in the circulation of the Gulf Stream, if not it's collapse. England and Europe, best be getting prepared for the cold.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by Iamschist
 


Thanks for the reply Iamschist.
I did not think I would get many replies, since there is no a current event that would get people talking about this, other than the NASA study showing how much of the ice-cap is gone.
To be honest, I am not an expert on climate or weather, and all I know about an anti-cyclone is that it is a high pressure system that causes winds that rotate clockwise as they spread out from the center. It's the opposite of a cyclone (Hurricane), in terms of pressure and rotation, and I think does not usually cause storms, just sustained winds.
I do know that most surface currents are created by the prevailing winds, and that the ice pack that did exist would have prevented the prevailing winds from creating strong surface currents in the arctic ocean until now.
Who knows?

M



 
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