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Elephant Paints Self Portrait!

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posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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A recent thread about a chimp cooking reminded me of this amazing video. I'm sure most have seen it but a second look can't hurt.

]Oh, and the painting starts around the one minute mark.
edit on 8/28/2012 by MissSmartypants because: (no reason given)

edit on 8/28/2012 by MissSmartypants because: mistake

edit on 8/28/2012 by MissSmartypants because: more info




posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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NO F ING WAY!



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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I saw that before. Blows your mind!!!!!!!!!!



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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that is awesome.
why do people kill and keep these great creatures in captivity?



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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Doesn't matter how many times I've seen it, still is absolutely amazing to watch.

Thank you for posting.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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Guess how it can do that?

Repetitive training using punishment is common for elephant tricks so while this seems great, consider what goes through it's mind when it paints.

I'd rather see it free. Please dont be so naive.
edit on 28/8/2012 by nerbot because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by listerofsmeg
 


from what i gather this is an asian elefant and they get poached a lot.

so some are kept in captivity "for their safety"

some are abused--some say trained using less than humane methods.

hopefully not this one.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by MissSmartypants
 


I had never seen this video before today. Thanks. What an amazing elephant!



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by nerbot
Guess how it can do that?

Repetitive training using punishment is common for elephant tricks so while this seems great, consider what goes through it's mind when it paints.

I'd rather see it free. Please dont be so naive.
edit on 28/8/2012 by nerbot because: (no reason given)


wow..if that is true, that is so sad.

It does make sense though, because I can't see an elephant doing this without some sort of coaching.

If they are using abuse to train the animals to do this instead of just coaching, I have to give it a big thumbs down.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by nerbot
Guess how it can do that?

Repetitive training using punishment is common for elephant tricks so while this seems great, consider what goes through it's mind when it paints.

I'd rather see it free. Please dont be so naive.


You want to see it free?

How much money are you willing to give to protect them? To protect their habitat? To pay for inoculations? To fight their legal battles? To train locals to take care of them? . . . . and etc etc etc etc.

For every Feel Good ideological plan - - - you better have a cold hard fact one to back it up.

Tourists buy the paintings. The proceeds help protect these animals.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by Annee
 


wow annee good point!



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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It's a tourist business that makes money. No elephant, no money.
edit on 28/8/2012 by nerbot because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by nerbot
Guess how it can do that?

Repetitive training using punishment is common for elephant tricks so while this seems great, consider what goes through it's mind when it paints.

I'd rather see it free. Please dont be so naive.
edit on 28/8/2012 by nerbot because: (no reason given)

According to the organization that sells the elephant paintings...

Your purchase of elephant art directly contributes to supporting the Asian elephants who are rapidly becoming extinct and in need of help now. At the beginning of the 20th century, there were about 200,000 Asian elephants. Now, only a few thousand are left in Thailand. This is why we feel strongly about supporting the Thai Elephant Conservation campaign. Conservation is a very complex issue that requires integrated solutions. Purchasing these authentic elephant paintings is one part of the solution and tremendously helps pay for food, medical and environmental programs.

Only some elephants enjoy and have this amazing talent to paint. These elephants are treated very well and learn to paint with positive behavioral training techniques with favorite foods and positive words and touch. We have done considerable research and are in contact with high level officials such as the Special Pachyderm Advisor to the Thai Queen's Foundation; research teams from the Smithsonian; veterinarians from the Department of Large Animal and Wildlife Sciences; Mahout University; and many others to ensure that the highest standards of elephant management are followed.

Yes, we would prefer and these elephants would prefer to be in the wild. But, reintroduction efforts have not been successful and despite efforts to protect them, these animals are in great danger of becoming extinct. As symbols of majesty and power, they are an important part of Thai history. Losing these gentle giants would also lose a big part of Thai culture and another beautiful creation in the world. Many believe that the future of the Asian elephant depends on well managed private elephant camps where the elephants are treated well and allowed to have babies.
www.exoticworldgifts.com...



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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The elephants have been trained to paint these images and are handed brushes pre-loaded with paint of the appropriate color: www.snopes.com...

An animal expert explains it in a video on this site:
urbanlegends.about.com...

...and if you look closely, you see that the shots are edited. Watch the close-ups of the trunk trying to paint and you can tell that the elephant can't actually see the canvas -- trunk and paintbrush grope for the surface and often they continue making brush strokes even when the brush isn't on the canvas.



posted on Dec, 21 2014 @ 06:54 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd
The elephants have been trained to paint these images and are handed brushes pre-loaded with paint of the appropriate color: www.snopes.com...

An animal expert explains it in a video on this site:
urbanlegends.about.com...

...and if you look closely, you see that the shots are edited. Watch the close-ups of the trunk trying to paint and you can tell that the elephant can't actually see the canvas -- trunk and paintbrush grope for the surface and often they continue making brush strokes even when the brush isn't on the canvas.
Of course the elephant can see the canvas (duh) and as far as the elephants trunk movements....you are nit picking. Since these animals cannot be reintroduced into the wild , having this activity available to them is an innovative way to help these intelligent creatures pass the time .



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