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Parent Training Classes

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posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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I don't want to be a parent, as I don't want children. But if it ever happens, I have promised myself that I'd be as good as a parent as I possibly can. I don't have any children, and I'm not very good with them. I have poor social skills, so that's my main reason why I don't want to be a parent. There are many other reasons, of course, but that's one of my big ones.

With that being said, if I knew I was going to be a parent, I wouldn't go into it blindly. I would look into taking parenting classes so I could be the better parent that I never had in my life.

Assuming, of course, those classes actually do have something to offer.

You see, I am also ambivalent about taking them. Because I don't know what information they actually provide, there seems to be scant information on them, or at least I haven't found the information on what they have to offer.

So my main concerns about the parenting classes are two fold. One is they're nothing but political indoctrination classes disguised as parenting classes, or the big message they have to teach is that you must spoil your child to no end.

i don't believe in either. I don't want to be a strict parent, but I don't want to be a lackluster parent either. I want to teach my kids discipline and good work ethics and good social skills that I lack. I want to have a balance between discipline and lack of it, and I don't want to harshly discipline my kids and mess with them the way I was messed with by the adults.

And i'm not so sure that the parenting classes would actually teach how to strive for that balance

So I put this question to you: have you ever taken parenting classes, and if you did what was your experience with them and what did they teach?




posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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This reply deviates a bit from your point, but reminds me of Senator Patty Murray (D-Washington). She is known as the "Mom in tennis shoes." Her only career before politics was as a preschool teacher. She also taught parenting classes at a local community college. (In other words, here is the government teaching you the proper way to be a parent.) The state cut funding for her job, so she lobbied to restore funding and ultimately became a US Senator. She frequently tops the list of "Dumbest Senator ever."

She has no children.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 03:57 PM
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The only class I took was infant safety. However, our community offers support classes for parents. Basically it's a nurse trained in infant and child development who can answer any questions you might have.

Honestly, I don't know if any class could prepare you to be a parent. A gazillion things happen everyday and you never see them coming. Like the time my son squooshed a pbj in the DVD player. Or the time he drank shampoo. Or the time he ate cat food. We had the poison control center on speed dial.

Parenting is a delight and a joy, but it certainly has its moments.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
Honestly, I don't know if any class could prepare you to be a parent. A gazillion things happen everyday and you never see them coming. Like the time my son squooshed a pbj in the DVD player. Or the time he drank shampoo. Or the time he ate cat food. We had the poison control center on speed dial.


One day I asked my two grandsons, "What does cat food taste like?"

"It tastes like cereal," said one.
"Yeah," nodded the other.

Gotcha!



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by EvilSadamClone



I want to teach my kids discipline and good work ethics and good social skills that I lack.




Before considering parenting classes or actually becoming a parent you should consider fixing this first. You can't teach someone something that you don't know and those are pretty freaking important things to teach a child.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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Honestly, I don't know if any class could prepare you to be a parent. A gazillion things happen everyday and you never see them coming. Like the time my son squooshed a pbj in the DVD player. Or the time he drank shampoo. Or the time he ate cat food. We had the poison control center on speed dial.


Oh smylee that cracked me up....and bought back memories. What about the self-hair cuts? and eating dirt? or if its not bolted down it goes in the bath - phones the lot!! sharp edges, cupboard doors - mate I could go on...

ESC - mate it is the biggest learning curve you will ever experience and I cannot emphasise that enough. Now I am a father BUT being a mother is a whole lot harder - the discipline etc comes with age as they grow and its not as hard as it seems - kids react well to the carrot and stick approach. MUM needs the support mate in those first 5 years at least - she will usually take care of the little things we blokes dont even get to see.

I never had parent classes but I am fully qualified medically and I learnt what I know from the way I was bought up and of course the wisdom of Solomon.

Anyway mate - you'll be fine if you embrace it - just wait until that unforgettable moment when you witness the child being born - DO NOT MISS IT - I can't explain but it is life changing and you shift gears forever......beautiful.

ETA:


One day I asked my two grandsons, "What does cat food taste like?" "It tastes like cereal," said one. "Yeah," nodded the other. Gotcha!



edit on 28-8-2012 by Sublimecraft because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler

Originally posted by smyleegrl
Honestly, I don't know if any class could prepare you to be a parent. A gazillion things happen everyday and you never see them coming. Like the time my son squooshed a pbj in the DVD player. Or the time he drank shampoo. Or the time he ate cat food. We had the poison control center on speed dial.


One day I asked my two grandsons, "What does cat food taste like?"

"It tastes like cereal," said one.
"Yeah," nodded the other.

Gotcha!


My six year old and four year old were caught eating a hamster treat. I asked them what it tasted like and the six year old said:
"First it tastes like goodness, then it tastes like wood".

OT - There are plenty of books you could read about being a good parent, but the most important thing IMHO is to just remember that they are little people and should be treated with love and respect. After all, those are the qualities we wish to see them exhibit in the world as adults (well I sure do).



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 08:49 PM
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My own childhood wasn't very happy and I wanted to do better by my kids. When I was pregnant the first time, I saw a parent correcting their 2 year old (who was being rough with a newborn puppy) -- not by hitting the child but by sitting down with them and then showing them the right way to handle the puppy. I asked, and she said she'd been taught by the book I'M OKAY, YOU'RE OKAY.

I read it and that became one of my main approaches to parenting.

Your mileage may vary.



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 11:26 AM
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This isn't a great mystery is it? Why don't you just ask about the content of the course and see if it's something you would get something from. My wife and I took infant cpr/first aid so that we could be prepared. There was nothing political about it. We also took a pre-birth class that gave information on different techniques that can be used to cope with labor and delivery. It gave us options, and not a strict set of rules to follow.



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 12:02 PM
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If you are one of those people who think they might need a parenting class, then you probably don't need one.

Some people have kids and don't give a monkeys uncle about the in's and out's of parenting. Most folks I know though, including myself have before birth and beyond - read, re read, watched, eaten and digested every bit of info, tips and guides they can get their hands on. Did it with all three of mine, like brushing up for an exam. All you can do is prepare, then be mindful of the future.

All the information you need is already at your fingertips or on a bookshelf. Wade through it and take what is useful to you.


CX

posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 12:51 PM
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Good thread.


Firstly, the fact that you are even thinking about parenting classes show to me that you'd be a better parent than many out there.

I have two girls, they are 13 and 14 now.

I started with a first aid course covering babies and children. I was already first aid trained, but there are some differences with little ones. I wanted to be ready for most things that happened around the house.

At their primary school there were often parenting workshops and i attended all of them. Sometimes it was more education based so you could help with homework, but other parenting skills came into play too. It was good hearing other parents views too, sometimes their tactics worked better in certain situations.

Last year i did a "Coping with teenagers" course, it was 6 weeks longs (just a two hour session per week). It was called "Teen Triple P....Positive Parenting Programme". It was very good and informative. Much of these programmes though are common sense, and you do what you can at the time.

I used parenting websites and forums a lot whilst the kids were growing up, still do at times, a parents view can be much more beneficial than that of a so-called expert in child behaviour.

Like i say though, just asking about it tells me you would at least be slightly bothered about doing the right thing....and thats a damn sight more than many.

CX.



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by EvilSadamClone
 


"How to raise an emotionally intelligent child" by John Gottman.



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by Ulyeney
 


Yes.

Treat your child how you want to be treated. Which means to not demean their feelings, or their needs.

It means NOT treating them like second rate citizens.



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 02:51 PM
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These stories are cracking me up. I just dealt with the self hair cut. We had to shave his head, but at least he is a boy. lol


CX

posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
These stories are cracking me up. I just dealt with the self hair cut. We had to shave his head, but at least he is a boy. lol


LOl we had that with our little one....she's a girl though.


I was at work, my wife was having an afternoon nap and thought the kids were too.....she woke up to hear the words, "Ok you cut my hair now!"


I almost wet myself with laughter when i got home, it was down to the scalp and she looked like a mini-me!


Totaly agree with treating them how you want to be treated yourself.

CX.




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