The Nevada Triangle: Have You Experienced It?

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posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 08:54 AM
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Greetings, ATS!

Found an interesting new website and stumbled across an article claiming that part of Nevada exhibits the same freakiness as the Bermuda Triangle. Its estimated that 2,000 planes have crashed there in the last 60 years, which is an average of 3 planes a month.

From the website Historic Mysteries:



Much of Nevada is uninhabited, and parts are virtually inaccessible by helicopter or truck. This doesn’t completely explain why the planes crashed, and so an explanation is needed for many of the incidents.

Some who study the Triangle include the mysterious Area 51 within the confines of the Triangle, which adds to the allure of the mystery.



But the area's most famous incident involved Steve Fossett in 2007.




On September 3, 2007, Steve Fossett set out for a flight that would take him across the Nevada Triangle. He was to return to the same airport he started from — a quick round-trip flight.

He never arrived back at his home base, the Flying-M Ranch.

An intensive search across Nevada and in the Sierra Nevada mountains found no trace of Fossett or of his plane. After searching for almost a month, the official search was called off.

In September of 2008, a backpacker hiking in the mountains that separate Nevada from California came across identification papers belonging to Fossett. Another search, several days later, yielded the remains of his plane. There was no log or “black box” to give information about the last moments of the plane’s flight. Fossett’s whole body was never found, although two small bones near the crash site were a match to his DNA.

Explanations for Fossett’s doomed flight ranged from freakish meteorological conditions to the old stand-by of outer-space aliens.



Obviously, we shouldn't assume paranormal events until all other possibilities have been rejected. But what I'd like to know is if anyone has been to the Nevada Triangle area and experienced strange things? The triangle covers the Sierra Nevada mountains to Death Valley.





posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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NT might be explained by the mountains, though. I remember watching planes fly around in Alaska, on one of the Alaskan shows. The way wind whips around the mountaintops can suddenly push you down and into the mountainside.
edit on 28-8-2012 by CynicalDrivel because: forgot an s



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by CynicalDrivel
 


Yes, I suspect wind shears and other weather events are probably a large part of the crashes. But all? Maybe, maybe not...(insert Twilight Zone music)



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


S&F, Smyleegirl, very interesting. I am headed to that area this weekend for some hiking and fishing. Thank heavens, we're driving. If I do not return, please send out UFO Hunters and the Bigfoot Research team.


Seriously, I do find it interesting, and will report back on any strangeness. 'May interview some of the locals and see if they have any personal stories.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 10:37 AM
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Ya that backpacker found a wodd of cash that belonged to Fosset, Dont exactly know why he would need all tht cash unless he thought he might need it, in case he went down earIy, and needed it. I think its a very cruel enviroment in that area of the world. With Fosset, I believe it was human era, that brought him to an early death.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Thanks for bringing this to my attention. I didn't know Nevada had one of those mystery triangles. S&F OP!

I don't have any experiences to share, but I will post another link for your readers.
www.mysterycasebook.com...



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 12:39 AM
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Nevada is a really strange place for so, so many reasons. But, I have never heard of the NV triangle nor have I heard of planes having difficulty navigating/ getting lost. Thanks for throwing something new my way



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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I'm going to assume..
military TOP SECRET base/testing. anyone who goes in, doesn't come back.
and it is made sure that there is no black box left.

it seems like a logical explanation to me?



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 02:41 AM
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reply to post by graceunderpressure
 


You totally should , run it like an investigation of sorts. That's what ATS needs more of. People on the ground finding things out rather than looking at youtube vids and becoming 'experts'



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 06:14 AM
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No weird happenings through the area, but I have only traveled inside its borders in the Northers section....Barely.

These are interesting, and hopefully will be preserved.
www.google.com... _fQ9UIaGL4TY8gT36IFQ&usg=AFQjCNFdGMSM1zjT-WjJgoHIr3KvKnR6fg

Something occurred to me, and that is that there are these Glyphs all over the world, and it's likely many yet to be discovered, and many made but lost due to vegetation.
One thing that sticks out is the symbols being located around the world in places where aerial views would be most likely. What I think in some cases is, that the people or civilizations who created them, seemed to use the natural fauna and flora ie. rocks or absence of rocks (Aggregates) to form the shapes and color variations in a one dimensional medium. Prolific civilizations had the where with all to construct pyramids or temples. Lesser affluent peoples the Nazca lines and so on. I think you follow my illustration. Waiting, always waiting, with a calling card in view for any aerial craft to see. How many visitations or their regularity has been lost in the pages of time. As I say, these occurrences seem to indicate to me that there might be 'Regular landing areas' and remote areas of less interest........ that is, to extraterrestrials. Just a thought.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by Plotus
 


Wow- those glyphs are interesting in your link, Plotus- never heard of them before.

I find the Steve Fossett story interesting too- I understand about the wind shear/ strange air currents etc, but Fossett was an extremely accomplished pilot, and would have been aware too. The crash scene suggests a high speed impact with the ground, killing him instantly, suggesting he completely lost control of the aircraft, either through mechanical failure or perhaps he was incapacitated in someway. The fact that they only found one or two very small bones adds to the mystery (yes, I know, people are going to say 'wild animals', but usually you would find a skull, or vertebrae- the 'less digestable' bones, and bits of clothing) and it made me think of the '411' disappearences, where they find very little of the corpse, and what they do find doesnt make sense.

S&F for an interesting read!



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 07:40 AM
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reply to post by Thunda
 


The thing about wild animals and bodies, they usually don't drag the body far, far away to scavenge.

I worked with a tracker in the Smoky Mountains. He was the guy who would look for missing folks, and he was a genius at what he did.

Several times we would look for missing people who's plane had crashed; you know there's a 99% chance they are dead so you aren't really looking for survivors.

In every case where we found the plane, bears and other animals had scavanged. Yet they only moved the bodies a little ways, and always downhill. The forensic crew usually managed to find the majority of bones, even the tiny phalanges.

So another interesting twist....



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by graceunderpressure
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


S&F, Smyleegirl, very interesting. I am headed to that area this weekend for some hiking and fishing. Thank heavens, we're driving. If I do not return, please send out UFO Hunters and the Bigfoot Research team.


Seriously, I do find it interesting, and will report back on any strangeness. 'May interview some of the locals and see if they have any personal stories.


Outstanding!!!!!

I love it when we're able to have members do some investigating. Can't wait to hear your results, if you find anything. Enjoy yourself and be safe!



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Thanks for sharing!



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 05:32 PM
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Usually, from what I have come to understand, areas deemed "mysterious" like the different triangles around the world, etc., are nothing more than areas that can at times become seriously dangerous for various reasons. Plus, if these areas are highly trafficked by various types of vehicles, the odds actually seem quite normal, once the dangerous aspects have been identified.

For instance, in the area you talk about in Nevada, I would think weather conditions would be the biggest hazard to small planes. I am not familiar with the area at all, but I assume there are mountains in the area from what you quoted in your initial post. Whenever you have mountains, there is the chance for updrafts and all sorts of other wind conditions that can toss a small plane around like a toy, and looking back through history many small planes that have crashed have succumbed to these meteorological conditions. I know this is true for all mountainous regions, especially places like Alaska and whatnot where the temperatures are very low. This can cause icing on the wings, which can harm the plane's ability to remain aerodynamically stable.

There are just many, many more reasons, including pilot error, flying too close to a mountain, etc., that better explain any disappearances in any area than supernatural forces. That's the bottom line in my opinion. Does that mean that there is no way that the contrary could be true? Of course not, but all I mean is that one is much more likely than the other. Anyway, thanks for bringing this to my attention though, as I had never heard of any area in Nevada that is considered mysterious for disappearances or anything.

In the scenario described in your original post it is pretty clear that the plane crashed and the pilot perished either on impact or succumbed to his injuries near the crash site, since bones were found. It is not unusual that the majority of the bones were missing, as scavengers likely had carried them off rather quickly. Nature has a way of erasing any human presence after a while. An entire city like New York, despite its size, would look like a regular forest after only a few centuries without a human presence. So nothing odd there in my honest opinion.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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i have been through that area that they are designating as the 'triangle'; interesting area

i do not recall any anomalies when we went through there except that i wanted to get the heck out of there..however, about 11 years ago i decided it would be 'fun' to take my daughter on the 'et highway' which criss crosses the inner part of the state. we left from bryce canyon that morning intending to make carson city by nightfall.

quite the adventure...first off, there were the signs...so i guess you are supposed to be on 'alert' for any sightings; however, once you leave the little town on the edge there, there is nothing, and i mean, nothing..it feels like you are on the moon. no traffic to speak of...which after about twenty, thirty miles gets kinda creepy..

my daughter was not real happy(course she was thirteen; nothing really made her happy lol)and so sat in the back of the suv i had rented. it was hot--but scary, no water obviously..no water for miles, not until you reach tonopah. i saw something that i still don't know what it was...maybe a 'dust devil'? but i have seen those(got to have lots of experience in az with em)and these were something else..they would literally pick up speed in between these black, vegetation-less canyons...at one point, i believe i pulled over to just sit there with my mouth hanging open...the whole place felt 'bad', dark, i don't mean to sound 'new agish' but i just don't know how else to describe it..

the topper was when, suddenly, a car coming towards us, spun around dramatically and pulled over, apparently to see some bones of a cow(why would you have cows out there, but there were). so i stopped to see too, but if that was a cow, then i am santa...i mean, i still don't know what the heck that was on the side of the road and neither did the guy who had stopped. neither his wife, kids, or my daughter would get out the of vehicles..

if i knew then what i know now i woulda looked around a bit more, taken samples..but the general feeling there was one of trepidation..even the guy seemed spooked a little....

not a journey i would like to repeat if i can help it...



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 12:26 AM
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never heard of this triangle! cool,,, but judging from the mountains in that area, id say wind sheer is probably 70% at fault, fog, ice, ect, i remember a couple stories from that area , not to long ago about how pilots get confused and slamed right into mountain face thinking they were much higher,,,
could there be magnetic rocks in the mountain that would confuse the planes equipment?



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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Found a link to a map image



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Im a native to Nevada (NLV) and after high school I went for my private pilot license. I flew from NLV to Ely, NV, to Death Valley, and to Tonopah. Never went north of Tonopah, like Reno or Winnemucca. Anyways, I've been all over the mountain side of Nevada and haven't experienced any paranormal activities.

A friend of the family who was a tour pilot for Vegas died recently in Utah out of Zion National Park. Still uncertain what the cause was. There has been quite a few plane crashes in that area as well. Kathryn's Report
edit on 30-8-2012 by Alchemst7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 01:09 AM
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Originally posted by Thunda
reply to post by Plotus
 


Wow- those glyphs are interesting in your link, Plotus- never heard of them before.

I find the Steve Fossett story interesting too- I understand about the wind shear/ strange air currents etc, but Fossett was an extremely accomplished pilot, and would have been aware too. The crash scene suggests a high speed impact with the ground, killing him instantly, suggesting he completely lost control of the aircraft, either through mechanical failure or perhaps he was incapacitated in someway. The fact that they only found one or two very small bones adds to the mystery (yes, I know, people are going to say 'wild animals', but usually you would find a skull, or vertebrae- the 'less digestable' bones, and bits of clothing) and it made me think of the '411' disappearences, where they find very little of the corpse, and what they do find doesnt make sense.

S&F for an interesting read!


The NTSB report was very definite.

He got caught in a downdraft that exceeded his aircraft's rate of climb over rough terrain and essentially got pushed into the ground.

It doesn't matter how good of a pilot you are in that situation, unless you can get out of the air column you are going to crash.


On March 5, 2009, the NTSB issued its report and findings. It states that the plane crashed at an elevation of about 10,000 feet, 300 feet (91 m) below the crest of the ridge. The elevation of peaks in the area exceeded 13,000 feet (4,000 m).

However, the density altitude in the area at the time and place of the crash was estimated to be 12,700 feet (3,900 m). The aircraft, a tandem two-seater, was nearly 30 years old, and Fossett had flown approximately 40 hours in this type.

The plane's operating manual says that at an altitude of 13,000 feet (4,000 m) the rate of climb would be 300 feet per minute.

The NTSB report says that "a meteorologist from Salinas provided a numerical simulation of the conditions in the accident area using the WRF-ARW (Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting) numerical model.

At 0930 [the approximate time of the crash] the model displayed downdrafts in that area of approximately 300 feet per minute." There was no evidence of equipment failure.

The report stated that a postmortem examination of the skeletal fragments had been performed under the auspices of the Madera County Sheriff's Department. The cause of death was determined to be multiple traumatic injuries.


On July 9, 2009, the NTSB declared the probable cause of the crash as "the pilot’s inadvertent encounter with downdrafts that exceeded the climb capability of the airplane. Contributing to the accident were the downdrafts, high density altitude, and mountainous terrain."


Steve Fossett/NTSB report and findings





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