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Curiosity sends back first high- resolution colour picture of Mars+First voice ever heard on Mars

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posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 07:03 PM
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Originally posted by Glassbender777
I heard on Coast to Coast that Nasa plans on sending a new Will I Am music back to Earth via Radio waves, not Voice. But still a weird thing to do, And pretty much a waste of time. Wonder how much that costs.???


Ha! I agree a bit strange.
Oh and I did a seance just now with Mozart and Beethoven and they said
they are totally cool with it.




posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by GezinhoKiko
 


It looks like New Mexico. Vast and desolate haha



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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This is the reason the sky is white:


The colour contrast has been adjusted by NASA – the original is covered with a yellow-orangey hue – in order to make the photo reflect what Mars would look like if it had the same level of natural sunlight as does Earth.


TheJournal

Photo in original/actual colour

Didn't see much point to the voice recording but I listened until I heard "others have tried – only America has fully succeeded."
Well at least the Martians know which nation to annihilate for invading.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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this is the original photo. much nicer!



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 01:16 AM
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Originally posted by GezinhoKiko

why is the sky white?
edit on 28-8-2012 by GezinhoKiko because: (no reason given)


Nasa is probably playing with the colours again on photoshop - you know - making sure the sky isn't blue and that there aren't any inconvenient aliens running around



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 03:03 AM
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Originally posted by Thrace
Looking at the photo it almost looks as if it's someones first attempt at making a cgi landscape in photoshop.

Yes, I'm sure that if NASA was conspiring to deceive the public, they would hire an incompetent without experience to do their PhotoShopping for them. Makes perfect sense.



Originally posted by Elentarri
Nasa is probably playing with the colours again on photoshop - you know - making sure the sky isn't blue and that there aren't any inconvenient aliens running around

And yes, I'm sure NASA would fit cameras on their Mars landers and rovers, and broadcast the images they produce to the world, if they were trying to cover up the fact that Mars is inhabited.


I hope you two are children. I shudder, frankly, to think you might be adults.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 03:04 AM
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if a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?


even if we DO hear it through recordings. no one is actually THERE to hear it. (that we're aware of.)
it's kinda saddening to think about..
edit on 29-8-2012 by novemberecho because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by jazzguy
 

Although it's bad this is probably of more value for future scientific missions than any other experiment. The worst enemy to all scientific experiments is no funding due to no public interest.
Everer asked yourself why there are thousands of studies that tell you why drug/pill x or y is great but nearly none that really tests this stuff? It's all about the money and who is willing to pay for it (big pharma against the public in this example).

If this music played back from mars is able to convince the public 'how cool' this is the next mission might get more funds as there is more public interest in such a mission. The public don't want to know about the latest spectrograph of a stone although this would be really important. They don't understand this stuff so it's not interesting. Music however is cool as they understand so maybe this is the key to make them believe that such missions are cool.

So it's more or less of indirect scientific value



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 05:18 AM
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fake , the pic

they ve cut a pic of a sediment rock in seperate lateral pieces,
then played around with them a bit, and glued everything back to one whole pic

sigh.

One has to be a devoted Fundamentalist, to believe so stubborn in this mars thing

and on other threads, religious fundamentalism is haughty being despised.........



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 05:19 AM
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reply to post by blackmetalmist
 





However the downfall to this mission would be that whomever arrives in MARS will be unable to come back. So once you are there, you are there till you die. There is no coming back to Earth.


Oh well. They could still keep in contact with Earth, and go down in History as the first human to live on another planet. Not all bad.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 06:40 AM
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I'm a photographer so can comment on the sky...

If you expose for a scene like this and wish to get nice exposure and detail in the landscape you have to expose for the darker parts of the images as these are what you want to see detail in... i.e. the rocks etc.

When you do that the image over exposes the lighter parts which in this case it's the sky... this causes it to 'blow out' and become totally white.

I'm struggling to come up with an example but these one should show what I mean reasonably well. It's a photo I took of my wife at a wedding (she was a bridesmaid). Now I set my exposure for the background so it would be lit properly, but then under exposed slightly hoping to keep some of the detail in the sky (i.e. blue sky and clouds etc)... then added a little flash to boost the light on her. I didn't quite get it right and as you'll see the sky is almost completely white, despite it being a lovely day with lots of blue sky and clouds:



If I'd just exposed correctly for the sky, all the background, my wife etc would have been really dark and under exposed based on the fact that the sky is WAY brighter than the rest of the image.

It's a constant headache for photographers believe me!

So no real issue with this pic IMO... if I can't get it right then a little unmanned rover on Mars aint going to be able to!

Hope that all makes sense



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 06:48 AM
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Check out the difference in the martian sky with the pics taken from the pathfinder missions ,must have been one heck of a dust storm to make the sky so red , and now the curiosity pics the sky is so white I wonder if it is a seasonal thing? Or this shot could have been taken early morning or late afternoon.



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by Peruvianmonk
 


Looks a lot like Arizona or Utah



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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If NASA can post images with the colours changed so can I.


(click for full size)


PS: the above image doesn't mean that's the real colours of that Mars scene, it only means that this is how the image looks when the levels for all channels are optimized.



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


And I must repeat what I said about this in another post but the experts curiously preferred not to comment:

I credit must be given to all the folks who complained about the other rovers' "real Mars" colours and the NASA reddish approach to it. I read hundreds of beautiful explanations and experts undermining people's complains.

Well, in the end Mars is not that red and the "experts" are quiet. The amateurs balancing NASA's poor colouring were more right.

So I repeat my question here and maybe someone will answer:
Will NASA reevaluate the colour adjustments from Opportunity pictures, since now they cannot possibly deny the mistake?

They were wrong, the community said so when were very undermined.
My 2 cents
edit on 30-8-2012 by LordAdef because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by LordAdef
 

That's why I said in another thread that the images look like what I was expecting, not as red as the ones supplied by NASA, not as Earth-like as most of the photos posted by the people that said that NASA was changing the colours.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by _Phoenix_

Originally posted by sprtpilot
How is that image even remotely "high resolution"?

www.nasa.gov...
This one is a bit better.


It looks strange thou, what's with the dark bits? Strange shadows? Is it some kind of filter on the pictures causing this effect? It's most obvious at the bottom of the picture close to the camera, looks like oil lol.

Anyone know what this is about?


Great observation!
What if the color is off?
What if those dark grey areas are actually lush green, or something that resembles moss?
The more the images seem manipulated, the more exciting it gets.
Right now, all we can do is observe and imagine.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by Blastoff
 


That image has gone through some big adjustments in colour balance and contrast. If you look at the raw images from Mars you'll see that they have orange cast and low contrast, due to dusty atmosphere.
-->> photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...

Raw images from Curiosity: mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

Here's my take on the said image, with only slight colour-balancing:
img.photobucket.com...

If we were standing on Mars, our eyes would adjusts to the reddish colours, and so would our digital camers with their automatic white-balancing. Curiosity's cameras don't make that adjustment, so the raw images look unusually reddish to us.
edit on 28-11-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 03:53 AM
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reply to post by voyger2
 


"Although, notice the hills formations that are losing the round shape at the top"

i noticed that as well, more so near the left top of image, maybe it was cropped? some of the edges look "cutt"



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally posted by ~widowmaker~
reply to post by voyger2
 


"Although, notice the hills formations that are losing the round shape at the top"

i noticed that as well, more so near the left top of image, maybe it was cropped? some of the edges look "cutt"

I think that's because it's sediment layers which are being slowly eroded by the wind and dust.





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