Milky Way in detail.

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posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 03:13 AM
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Hi All

Here is a link to a project to picture One Billion Stars and the Milky Way in great detail the full image is 150 billion pixels

One Billion Stars

This link to a very detailed image of our Milky Way you can zoom in a scroll around see what you think.

Milky Way

Enjoy
edit on 28-8-2012 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 03:17 AM
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The hell are they hiding?! I wan't a map without cencorship!!! Cmon, they always doin this.



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 03:30 AM
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reply to post by jordanAKbramsen
 


What are you talking about?



posted on Aug, 28 2012 @ 03:49 PM
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Originally posted by jordanAKbramsen
The hell are they hiding?! I wan't a map without cencorship!!! Cmon, they always doin this.



?

Nick Risinger's Skymap

NR's Interactive Skymap


When looking at these images, please appreciate, that when fully zoomed in, every pixel of light is a star or a galaxy.

This image is just our galaxy the Milkyway. There are a 127 billion galaxies (estimated) that we can see, that are very much like our own Milkyway, with a similar number of stars in each.

There are probably an infinite amount out there, as the universe itself is infinite.

Then add on that there are probably other universes adjacent to our own (people are actively scouring the the skies, for evidence of the 'bruise' where our own universe bumped into and merged with another universe), then you start to get the idea of how big it is.

The observable universe is 78 billion light years from us, and the farthest we can see from point a, to the opposite side at point b is 156 billion light years.

So, to try to make that comprehensible, if you travelled the circumference of Earth (24,901 miles) at the speed of light (186,282 miles a SECOND) it would take you:

24,901 / 186,282 = 0.13367 seconds.

To travel from point A to point B (say beginning and end, even though it isn't) in the universe that WE CAN SEE, would take you 156 billion years, travelling at a speed of 186,282 miles a second, or 670,616,629 miles an hour.


Pretty big!


edit on 28-8-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 07:29 PM
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Thanks for posting



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 07:57 PM
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WOW!!!

This may be the coolest thing I've ever seen!!
It just BLOWS my mind how many stars there are in OUR GALAXY ALONE!!
Not to mention the BILLIONS of other galaxies.

Suns, all with the potential of having their own planets revolving around them.

HOLY mother of God this place is huge!!!

You can sit here all night and try, and you'll never even come close to being able to fathom how obscenely massive our Galaxy is, much less our Universe.

I have a headache now.

Thanks for the thread.



posted on Aug, 31 2012 @ 10:01 PM
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It is shocking....the number of stars!
To think about it freezes my brain!



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 06:55 AM
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Originally posted by Screwed
WOW!!!



You can sit here all night and try, and you'll never even come close to being able to fathom how obscenely massive our Galaxy is, much less our Universe.

I have a headache now.



I tried my best to make it comprehensible with a reference!



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 07:05 AM
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not buying it..

that is WAY more than a billion .. but.. why even make the mention of how many there are ..

and I've seen this picture taken awhile back nearly the same one.. how is this new ??



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 07:13 AM
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i LOVE these types of images of the milky way and of the areas that begin to stretch beyond.
these are amazing views.

and the interactive views are beautiful.

thank you for this glimpse.

and i have bookmarked this thread for those moments when i need to be reminded of just how significant i am/we are.

wow.



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 08:29 AM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Wow that's cool , I saw this mentioned on the BBCs Horizon program last week ... a labor of love for sure and what a stunning picture



posted on Sep, 1 2012 @ 08:38 AM
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reply to post by AmatuerSkyWatcher
 


Awesome and Amazing!!


Thanks for these two links, I have never seen them before....I have bookmarked them both so I can marvel at them many more times!

thanks again!...and a star for your trouble!



OP'er !!...... A star and Flag for your link too........very very impressive!
edit on 1-9-2012 by zerozero00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2012 @ 05:19 AM
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Originally posted by gortex
reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Wow that's cool , I saw this mentioned on the BBCs Horizon program last week ... a labor of love for sure and what a stunning picture


Saw that as well but this is a different one the one shown was this

Nick Risinger's Skymap

NR's Interactive Skymap



posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 06:30 PM
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YEP WE ARE ALL ALONE - I think not!!



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 03:50 AM
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reply to post by jordanAKbramsen
 


may i direct you to this
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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I was expecting to see a giant neon sign saying "PARTY HERE".

Now I know the truth. We are all alone. We will die alone.
edit on 21-11-2012 by MasonicFantom because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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Those are not really stars, they are just holes in the upside down bowl that rests on the back of the giant turtle we are riding.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Excuse me, I'm a real stooge with a reading disability, so haven't read the article since there's no hope I'd comprehend it.

So can you explain something for me? They used Earth-based telescopes...and our own galaxy is so massive that our satellites will never escape it it in our own lifetime.
So it's clearly of another galaxy, but don't know how they managed to get such a detailed view of it without anything from our own galaxy, which surrounds us, in the foreground. Do you know how?



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 02:23 AM
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Originally posted by MasonicFantom
reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Excuse me, I'm a real stooge with a reading disability, so haven't read the article since there's no hope I'd comprehend it.

So can you explain something for me? They used Earth-based telescopes...and our own galaxy is so massive that our satellites will never escape it it in our own lifetime.
So it's clearly of another galaxy, but don't know how they managed to get such a detailed view of it without anything from our own galaxy, which surrounds us, in the foreground. Do you know how?


Hi

If you are lucky and can go to an area with no city lights etc you can take pictures like this of the Milkyway



That image was taken in Arizona.

Then if you get pictures from the southern hemisphere say from Australia like this



This can be stitched together to form a panorama.

The example I gave in the OP is not two pictures but many taken from the Northern & Southern hemisphere.

This gives a rough idea of our location in the Milkyway



That's why we get the view from Earth that we do.
edit on 23-11-2012 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 

Hi

Thanks, buddy boy. You get a star for that. Add it to the picture.
edit on 24-11-2012 by MasonicFantom because: (no reason given)





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