Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Verneshot: Catastrophic Mass Extinction Events That Make More Sense Than Asteroid Strikes?

page: 2
25
<< 1   >>

log in

join

posted on Aug, 27 2012 @ 06:20 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


Really nice response


While these deep pockets of high pressure gas may not be an ideal power source they do serve to graphically illustrate the essentially unlimited supply of non fossil fuels that lies beneath us all. I realize the extreme depth involved here may seem to preclude any action on our part yet finding some way to vent these pockets in a controlled manner might be preferable to a verneshot.

You'r ridicule is uncalled for and not needed here as i was only seeking to participate in your thread which in had been enjoying.

Have a good one




posted on Aug, 27 2012 @ 07:18 PM
link   
reply to post by iforget
 


Ok...Was just wondering if you knew what you were saying, in spite of seriously big problems trying to get that deep with drilling equipment. That's why I asked if you had read the thread, cause there seemed to be a disconnect....If you had said what you just did in the other post, would have made more sense... But w/e, it's all good...



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 04:21 PM
link   
What, no Phage here to tell me how whacked out this theory is? On noes, could this theory actually have some validity? 201 million years of built up gasses below the otherwise stable North American Craton.


Well if it blows, those that are left are gonna wish they had blown with it, that's for darn sure!



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 05:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by TrueAmerican
What, no Phage here to tell me how whacked out this theory is? On noes, could this theory actually have some validity? 201 million years of built up gasses below the otherwise stable North American Craton.


Well if it blows, those that are left are gonna wish they had blown with it, that's for darn sure!

It's an interestimg idea, but there is a better theory to explain the formation of large igneous provinces, such as the deccan and siberian traps.
Impact related anti-podal hot spot pairs.

Antipodal Hotspots on the Earth: Vestiges of Major Oceanic Bolide Impacts?

Hagstrum, J. T.

American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2003, abstract #V12B-0577

The distribution of hotspots on the Earth has a distinct antipodal character, which has previously been shown to be statistically significant (p



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 07:28 PM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Thanks for linking that abstract, and it is definitely food for thought. I see a couple of problems with it though:

1) The angle of incidence of the asteroid impact, relative to the dispersion of seismic waves from the event. Most of them seem to come in at an angle, and do not hit at a 90 degree perpendicular to the earth. I think this could have a drastic effect on the dispersion characteristics of the seismic portion of the impact, which leads me to:

2) Considering what is proposed in your linked abstract, I'd like to know how they would account for a focusing of this seismic energy to the degree that it would cause flood basalt volcanism at the antipode- when a) the earth is not exactly round, and thus automatically defocuses this energy; b) the varying layers of all different kinds of rock would contribute to this defocusing, especially at those distances, due to the refraction characteristics of seismic energy in varying densities of rock; and c) the necessary magma type (basalt) would have to be present in each of those cases to form the CFB in the first place.

What I am saying is that I find it hard to digest that all of those conditions could be met, considering what I just said.
edit on Wed Aug 29th 2012 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2012 @ 11:56 PM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


You pose an interesting counter theory Punkin.
In the OP's paper they state that the iridium layer from the K-T impact is found in between the basalt layers of the Deccan traps indicating that they began prior to impact. What say you?
The article acknowledges that a large impact occurred at the K-T boundary, it implies that this was a one time coincidence.

A very interesting article, an excellent post!
I have not finished reading how their model says the Verneshot creates shocked quartz, fullerenes, etc.

It is a little scary when they say that mantle plumes are active only for one magnetic reversal cycle, and we appear to be heading for a magnetic reversal. Maybe the CO2 will get me and not the H2SO4.

M



posted on Aug, 30 2012 @ 02:33 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


I wish I could answer your questions, but I cannot, I am certainly not a seismic wave propogation expert.
When I first found the abstract for the paper, the full version was available online, and they fully explain how they came to thier conclusions. Thier computational models accurately reflected observational data gathered through seismic studies.
But even without the full paper, just the number of mantle plume hot spots that have antipodal pairs is beyond pure chance.
And we see evidence of the mechanism on other planets in the solar system, mercury and mars.



posted on Sep, 16 2012 @ 02:25 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


Excellent thread, It makes more sense to me than an asteroid.
S&F





new topics

top topics



 
25
<< 1   >>

log in

join