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A Drug free cure for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

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posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by ollncasino
 


i get your point but i refer to an environment where you only need to focus on the next ring to collect or opponent to shoot which takes seconds (if indeed that much), then you reset and you are on to the next challenge - hence my comment on repeated hits of instant gratification. Sure, they could play a game all night but it does not require a long attention span, just a massive chain of tiny bursts of attention.




posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 04:49 PM
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Originally posted by skalla

i get your point but i refer to an environment where you only need to focus on the next ring to collect or opponent to shoot which takes seconds (if indeed that much), then you reset and you are on to the next challenge - hence my comment on repeated hits of instant gratification.


I have never played a game in which I collect a ring or shoot an opponent in seconds, reset and go onto the next challenge.

Every video game I have ever played has required extended periods of concentration.




More than 9 percent of kids now qualify for the diagnosis (almost half of whom are on medication).

Huffington Post


4.5% of US kids are on ADD medication?

Seriously?


It is no coincidence that rates began skyrocketing immediately after two unrelated events that occurred almost simultaneously in the late 1990s.

First, new drugs for ADD were brought to market that were no better than the old drugs, but they were lots more expensive and provided a rich profit incentive for aggressive marketing.

Second, FDA deregulation freed drug companies to pursue unrestrained direct-to-consumer multimedia advertising.

The companies quickly determined that peddling the ADD ill was the royal road to expanding the market for their new expensive pills.

Huffington Post


It would appear that ADD sky-rocked when the drugs companies introduced an expensive new ADD drug and were allowed to advertise it directly to parents.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by ollncasino

Originally posted by skalla

i get your point but i refer to an environment where you only need to focus on the next ring to collect or opponent to shoot which takes seconds (if indeed that much), then you reset and you are on to the next challenge - hence my comment on repeated hits of instant gratification.


I have never played a game in which I collect a ring or shoot an opponent in seconds, reset and go onto the next challenge.

Every video game I have ever played has required extended periods of concentration.




More than 9 percent of kids now qualify for the diagnosis (almost half of whom are on medication).

Huffington Post


4.5% of US kids are on ADD medication?

Seriously?


It is no coincidence that rates began skyrocketing immediately after two unrelated events that occurred almost simultaneously in the late 1990s.

First, new drugs for ADD were brought to market that were no better than the old drugs, but they were lots more expensive and provided a rich profit incentive for aggressive marketing.

Second, FDA deregulation freed drug companies to pursue unrestrained direct-to-consumer multimedia advertising.

The companies quickly determined that peddling the ADD ill was the royal road to expanding the market for their new expensive pills.

Huffington Post


It would appear that ADD sky-rocked when the drugs companies introduced an expensive new ADD drug and were allowed to advertise it directly to parents.




re video games, if playing a COD style FPS then with ADD/ADHD each action would be viewed individually - locate target, pursue or shoot in hyperfocus. succeed or fail, then attention is reset/turns to next target/threat/action etc. in a mario style platformer, deal with the next jump, bounce off a turtle or get a bunch of coins, then reset/turn attention and focus on next micro challenge etc etc, rinse and repeat.

and i agree that the availability and promotion of drugs has resulted in a vast increase in diagnosis.. in fact the diagnosis in the uk at least has an element of "flavour of the month", one year it will be mostly ADD/ADHD as diagnosis, then Attachment Disorder next year, then Emotional/Behavioural Difficulties the year after, (etc etc) all of these diffently diagnosed youngsters with near identical profiles and symptoms and treated in the same way and one cant help but think that that some professionals who diagnose are scrabbling around in the dark with the latest modish conditions (at best), or at worst not giving a damn and caving into pressure from managers/govt and phamaceutical companies.

for me it just goes back to what i said earlier about lazy diagnosis, and many people's experience of "people with ADD/ADHD" is limited to people who have IMO been mis-diagnosed - i know folk who when we first encounter them will literally climb the walls and spend all day looking or behaving like a squirrel on crack and entirley unable to manage their own conduct, impulses and emotions. Most of the more seriously challenged youngsters i have dealt with are intensely aware of this too, and hate the impact it has on their abilty function, make friends, be happy, secure and so forth.

their are drug free treatments that can be very effective, but those in charge just dont like paying for it.
edit on 24-8-2012 by skalla because: clarity



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 05:21 PM
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I have a friend who has an ADD child... recently i hung out with them both.

She has never diciplined her child, and always coddled him... He is 12 right now...

it was late at night, and she was putting him to bed. He did NOT want to go to bed at all, he couldn't sleep... and was bouncing around all over the place, likely because i was there... and he was a bit excited because we actually have quite a few things in common and had some fun that day.

As she was trying to put him to bed she was litterally called every name in the book by her son, and when she insisted he try and sleep he told her to F off...

My jaw dropped when i heard this, but this is not my child so i kept my mouth shut...

IF i said anything like that to my mother as a child she would have ripped my head off... And i admit, if my child spoke like that to his mother... he would regret it. And i garentee he would NEVER do it again.

im not saying we should beat the crap out of our children... but i believe a good whack now and again does work... It worked for me... it worked for my own mother... Children 30 years ago had more respect for their elders...

But these days, i don't see children having respect for anything... except for THE BOX




posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 05:22 PM
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When I was a kid we had a morning as well as afternoon recess, and if you ate your lunch fast enough you had time to go out on the playground then too ... and that's not to mention the amount of play, exercise and whatnot you got both before school and in the evenings afterwards ... nor does that doesn't account for the days when you had Phys. Ed.

There was no 'ADD, ADHD, etc' then. While we still found ways to act out or get into 'trouble', but not in the sense often associated with today's 'diagnoses' with regards over-active children. We had video games, Atari and the like, but even that got 'boring' after a while .... leaving us wanting to go outside and Actually do something. Walk/Bike to a friend's house. Down to the the local creek, pond or fishing hole.

School, itself, seemed different then, too ... not being 'taught to the test', so to speak. Civics, World Gov't., Business Math, etc. Civics and World Gov't. often being my personal favorites because the teachers ran it in a sort of debate-style fashion ... where one student was asked a question and others were allowed and encouraged to chime in with their answers and thoughts as well.

Nowadays,
:shk:
Just give the damn kid a pill. That'll 'settle' them down.


My wife was working outside the home at the time, so we had to put our youngest daughter into a 'daycare' of sorts ... it was supposedly geared more towards that of a pre-school type environment. About 3 weeks in one of the 'staff' approached my wife and mentioned how 'korrie' would often leave her group to join in with what the elder groups were doing at the time .. disrupting the 'classes' .. and that we should have her checked for ADD, ADHD, etc.


As a result we removed her from that 'pre-school' and placed her into a school-sponsored pre-kinder program for 'kids that might have a difficult time acclimating to a 'school' environment'.

She not only aced it, but when we informed the teacher of the 'pre-school's' recommendation , with regards having her tested for ADD, ADHD, etc ... she Actually laughed ... stating that 'korrie' was so far ahead of the others that she'd not only have No problem whatsoever acclimating to a school-type environment, but that she'd also likely far exceed core class curriculum and then some in just the first few months .... which she did.

Instead, for all too many these days, just give the damn kid a pill.

That'll fix their 'outspoken, unruly, and disruptive nature in the classroom. :shk: Who cares about their day-to-day life spent in front of either a tv or video game ... with nearly or literally no outside interactions, exercise or parental guidance and stimulation.

Yep ... just give 'em a pill. That'll fix it.


Schools, nowadays, seem little more than teachings to memory-based regurgitation and multiple-guess recitals of what they've been Told in classes... little more and nothing less.

Sad. That.

Oh ... Here ... It's time for your pill, Molly.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 05:48 PM
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sometimes people just need to be treated in a well thought out, individual manner to allow them to thrive.
part of the difficulty with this though is that it can be very hard for even the most switched on parent to do this effectively due to the time and resources required.
when i meet a new young person to work with, the first year is often spent unravelling the historic expectations of the child and absorbing challenging behaviour and setting up new expectations before therapeutic treatment (which is often residential) begins to show dividends.
the method used is based around an extremely patient approach (much easier when you are not the worried, exhausted parent who has had to absorb the symptoms for however many years), talking and non talking therapies, establishing a rewarding place in a community, individually tailored communication/listening and carefully explained and experienced cause and effect. with plenty of physical activity! Obviously there is more besides this and i tytpically work with a person for 3-4 years before they go on to the next chapter of their lives and further challenges, but i have seen some deeply challenged kids benefit massively and go on to do other things that exceed all previous expectations, and more importantly, regain their self worth and become far more independant.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by Akragon
 


i think i suffered from this as a child my cure was simple get up at 5 am and help the milk man at 12 i was doing 50 hours a week plus going to school & then some .i have heard that ritalin wires the brain in children so that if they take coke/speed when older it becomes the norm ? my sister showed me years ago what her girl was like 10 minutes after fizzy drinks / sweets one minute she was ok the next she was 110 mph its the E numbers
BUT by all means turn your children into MAD FUNKIES or give them hell ps i RETIRED at 43 :>its a hard knock life .its ahard knock life



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