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Are these GAMMA RAY bubbles MOVING towards SOL space?

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posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


I was speaking of the hot gasses as well as the types of gasses that may follow behind the already moving GAMMAY RAYS from the bubble. In simple are the hot gasses COOLED already or still hot moving this way & if not heated are there any hazardous gasses in the process moving as well?

edit on 8/24/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
I was speaking of the hot gasses as well as the types of gasses that may follow behing the already moving GAMMAY RAYS from the bubble. In simple are the hot gasses COOED already or still hot moving this way.
I know from other sources that interstellar gases can be over a million degrees but they are so thin you'd freeze to death in them. How's that for a paradox?

But I didn't see anything in your source about gases moving this way and I have no reason to infer that from the article. The solar wind is the biggest effect we see locally and that's always "blowing" away from the sun. What's interesting to see unfolding is that the voyager probe is just starting to leave the area in our solar system affected by solar wind, so in the upcoming years we will have more data from a probe on what's going on outside our solar system, beyond the influence of our solar wind.

I don't think of gas as moving toward us, rather as us moving though the interstellar medium as shown in this graphic:
The Local Interstellar Cloud


observations show that our Sun is moving through a Local Interstellar Cloud

So our solar system is moving through the gas, more than the gas moving toward us, though it's all relative to your point of view. And the solar wind makes a cool looking shock wave as we pass through this gas which is illustrated here:

The Sun's Heliosphere & Heliopause


The Sun's heliopause moves through the local interstellar medium much as a boat moves on water, pushing a bow shock out in front

edit on 24-8-2012 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


And the solar wind makes a cool looking shock wave as we pass through this gas which is illustrated here:

Maybe not.

Here, we provide combined consensus values for this velocity vector and show that they have important implications for the global interstellar interaction. In particular, the velocity is almost certainly slower than the fast magnetosonic speed, with no bow shock forming ahead of the heliosphere, as was widely expected in the past.

www.sciencemag.org...



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 



reply to post by Phage
 


Thank you both Arbitrageur & Phage for helping me out with understanding how this is all working out. I was thinking about it for some time and searched but could not find updated data on its whereabouts but the 2 of you are helping me to SEE better and its much appreciated.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks for the update! That shows that what's widely expected may not always be the case.

My guess is data from voyager may teach us a few things too, so our views regarding the solar wind should become more refined as we collect this additional data.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 

No doubt. When Voyager is in true interstellar space she's bound to tell us some things we hadn't thought about. Which of course will just present more questions.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by IntoxicatingMadness
 


I for one has stop worrying about the earth getting hit by asteroids when i realized the scale of Canis Majoris
.And an off topic question:What will happen to earth when it goes supernova?
edit on 24-8-2012 by wildapache because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by wildapache
reply to post by IntoxicatingMadness
 


I for one has stop worrying about the earth getting hit by asteroids when i realized the scale of Canis Majoris
.And an off topic question:What will happen to earth when it goes supernova?
I think it will go hypernova, and once it collapses and turns into a black hole, it should give off a gamma ray burst and light show that will reach us 3900 years later, so it's far enough away to not hurt us.

If however VY Canis Majoris was located within 200 light years of Earth instead of 3900 light years, and the axis of the GRB was pointed right at us, we would likely be doomed. Fortunately:

www.sciencedaily.com...

There are no stars within 200 light years of our Solar System that are of the type destined to explode as a GRB, so we do not expect to witness such an event at close range!



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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seeing as how these things are moving the speed of light and they are thousands of light years away
no i really dont think we have anything to worry about from this for a long time



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by sirhumperdink
 


Your "scientists" don't even ask the real/right question(s). What caused this? Can a black hole explode? I have always had a problem with the "singularity". The size of what your pics show, the energy source must be beyond imagination. If you think about it, the guts of a black hole hold more energy then anything else I can think of.



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by OmegaLogos
 


Well,aren't you the doom and gloom bubble buster!
Phage has been working on you as an apprentice,hasn't he.

BTW: Kudos to the nice post there with all the pretty pictures.




posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 02:24 AM
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Fermi-Data.

does that have to do with Fermi-Lab?
I live VERY close to Fermi.
deliver there sometimes. is there anything that would tip me off or give me any clues to something strange going on over there, so that I can keep everyone updated?
I literally pass by/go in there at LEAST 5 times a day.



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 02:38 AM
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I just want to know how anyone can produce supposed likenesses of our Galaxy when
no one has ever actually been far enough out to see it looking the way it is always pictured.

Aren't all of the depictions presented to us merely supposition?

Will everything have to be trashed and reprinted if things are not the same as has been depicted
for so long?
Or will they become collectors items?

edit on 25-8-2012 by azureskys because: added more



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 02:41 AM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 02:53 AM
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Originally posted by Yosemite Sam

Originally posted by kdog1982
reply to post by OmegaLogos
 


Well,aren't you the doom and gloom bubble buster! Phage has been working on you as an apprentice,hasn't he. BTW: Kudos to the nice post there with all the pretty pictures.



Here's my middle finger for your generous inconsequential contribution to the thread. In the future, please keep your off-topic comments to yourself.


Thank you mister grumpy pants.

In case you didn't understand my post,let me explain it.

I was being sarcastic in commenting on omegaloops post and giving them kudos for those wonderful pictures.

So,back on topic.

Nothing to worry about as far as those gamma ray bubbles are concerned.
Omegaloops,awesome post.



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 02:56 AM
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Originally posted by Yosemite Sam

Originally posted by novemberecho
Fermi-Data.

does that have to do with Fermi-Lab?
I live VERY close to Fermi.
deliver there sometimes. is there anything that would tip me off or give me any clues to something strange going on over there, so that I can keep everyone updated?
I literally pass by/go in there at LEAST 5 times a day.


The objects are thousands (at least) light years away. So, no threat to you. Please return to the cartoon network and enjoy.



It might have been kinder to advise "novemberecho" that a place to start to find out about information on Fermi-Data would be to look up the name Enrico Fermi.
But no,instead of helping another learn you find it necessary to ridicule. No one is born knowing
everything we each must learn and we mostly learn from each other in one way or another.
Share Knowledge



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 03:04 AM
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reply to post by novemberecho
 


Here is a good place to start looking to find out just what Fermi-Data is pertaining to:

en.wikipedia.org...

But don't stop there 'cause Fermi was an amazing man



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 03:15 AM
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A link to live gamma ray bursts.

grb.sonoma.edu...



posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 03:38 AM
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Originally posted by azureskys
I just want to know how anyone can produce supposed likenesses of our Galaxy when
no one has ever actually been far enough out to see it looking the way it is always pictured.

Aren't all of the depictions presented to us merely supposition?

Will everything have to be trashed and reprinted if things are not the same as has been depicted
for so long?
Or will they become collectors items?

edit on 25-8-2012 by azureskys because: added more


I wouldn't use the word supposition; I would say inferred.

True, we have not travelled far enough to look back and take a picture. However, we can look deep in to space and view many thousands of other galaxies; which are all remarkably similar.

You can also go out at night and look up to see another aspect of the symmetry of the Milky Way. You also have reams of spectroscopy data from the stars within our galaxy (i.e. their relative movement).

Beyond that, we have been studying the super massive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Which means we know (actually confirms) where the center is.

At the end of the day, the symmetry (via Hubble) and the largess (via spectroscopy) are quite indisputable.

If you are a chick in an egg, is it incorrect to suppose and thus infer that the shell around you is oblong as opposed to square?

In my mind there is sufficient emperical data to say that our galaxy is exactly how it has been depicted.

And for whatever it's worth, I am a hardcore scientific skeptic.



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