Judge orders release of detained Marine veteran

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posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 11:20 PM
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Originally posted by links234
reply to post by scoobdude
 


The police were allowed to hold him in the psych ward for 72 hours before holding a hearing. When the hearing occurred the judge ordered him to be held for 27 days, another hearing was held after the guy got a lawyer from the Rutherford Institute, at which time the new judge ordered him to be released.


As per the criminal code here in texas you have 48 hours to get the alleged criminal in front of a magistrate. Know your rights people. It may just help save you one day.




posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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Originally posted by scoobdude

Originally posted by links234

Originally posted by scoobdude
Can this person now go and criminally prosecute them for abuse of power, kidnapping, slander, and even further...


No, the police were well within the law and acted appropriately.


Yet the judge dismissed the case stating it was a violation of his civil rights? And just FYI, just cause its law does not make it legal


Hey, did you know, everything we do is legal, until a judge says otherwise?

Even if a judge labels a person's action illegal, another judge, higher up, can "overturn" his decision, and make that very illegal action "legal" once again.

This is how a police officer can arrest someone without cause.

Only when the arrested person is brought before the court, and the judge hears the case, can it be determined whether the police were right or wrong in arresting the guy.

This is the police power. But, every citizen has this power too. It's just that the majority of citizens don't know, and never exercise their power. A citizen can arrest a police officer for making an illegal arrest of himself. He has the power to do this. When he takes the policeman in front of the court in handcuffs, the judge will decide who is right and who is wrong.

This is why most police men work in pairs or even groups of more than two, because a single officer attempting to arrest a citizen could very well be arrested himself by that citizen. So, by working with a partner, they usually can overpower the single citizen and make the arrest stick their way.

If the cop tries to claim the citizen was resisting arrest, the citizen turns the tables on him and points out to the judge that he was arresting the cop, and has brought himself and the cop to the court, so obviously, he wasn't trying to avoid the court at all, only to do the right thing, as he saw fit.

Every citizen has the power, they just don't use it.



posted on Aug, 26 2012 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by GreatOwl

Originally posted by scoobdude

Originally posted by links234

Originally posted by scoobdude
Can this person now go and criminally prosecute them for abuse of power, kidnapping, slander, and even further...


No, the police were well within the law and acted appropriately.


Yet the judge dismissed the case stating it was a violation of his civil rights? And just FYI, just cause its law does not make it legal


Hey, did you know, everything we do is legal, until a judge says otherwise?

Even if a judge labels a person's action illegal, another judge, higher up, can "overturn" his decision, and make that very illegal action "legal" once again.

This is how a police officer can arrest someone without cause.

Only when the arrested person is brought before the court, and the judge hears the case, can it be determined whether the police were right or wrong in arresting the guy.

This is the police power. But, every citizen has this power too. It's just that the majority of citizens don't know, and never exercise their power. A citizen can arrest a police officer for making an illegal arrest of himself. He has the power to do this. When he takes the policeman in front of the court in handcuffs, the judge will decide who is right and who is wrong.

This is why most police men work in pairs or even groups of more than two, because a single officer attempting to arrest a citizen could very well be arrested himself by that citizen. So, by working with a partner, they usually can overpower the single citizen and make the arrest stick their way.

If the cop tries to claim the citizen was resisting arrest, the citizen turns the tables on him and points out to the judge that he was arresting the cop, and has brought himself and the cop to the court, so obviously, he wasn't trying to avoid the court at all, only to do the right thing, as he saw fit.

Every citizen has the power, they just don't use it.




Yep the power to police is given to all citizens...whether in uniform or not. The ones in uniform just get to put it as their job on their resume....and remember, ignorance of the law is not an excuse



posted on Aug, 26 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by scoobdude


Yep the power to police is given to all citizens...whether in uniform or not. The ones in uniform just get to put it as their job on their resume....and remember, ignorance of the law is not an excuse



The people "are" the law.

The police are just hired help, the judges are hired help, the legislators are hired help. These are public "servants".

So, who are the "masters" of these "servants" ?

We the people.

Do you take orders from your servants? Or do you give orders to your servants?

If a police man tries to give you an order, who is the master and who is the servant?

If you believe that the police are acting in good faith, then that police command is really an "advisory", as a good servant, you take the advice because you're paying him to help you.

But, if you "know" that the police are acting in bad faith, why on earth would you take that advice? It's then time to exercise your right to give and execute orders as any good master should.

The servants must be corrected by the masters when they stray from the path of righteousness.





 
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