UK police hold data on millions of innocent people.

page: 1
4

log in

join

posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 09:58 AM
link   
www.guardian.co.uk...


Documents released under the Freedom of Information Act reveal that police hold intelligence records of millions of people who have not been charged or convicted of any crime. The disclosures show that around 14m Metropolitan police intelligence reports and 38m from other forces, gathered routinely because they may prove useful, are being made available to all police agencies on the Police National Database (PND).

These records are for a variety of different reasons associates of criminals, allegations of crimes, victims of sexual or domestic abuse and people who have attended demonstrations.


Are innocent people being criminalised? Is it right for innocent people to have their data/images/details stored by the police for no good reason?

Is this the shape of things to come?


The Met intelligence files includes details about protesters who have attended demonstrations, unconvicted "persons of interest", associates of criminals, including lists of phone numbers stored on perpetrators' phones, allegations of crimes, and victims of sexual or domestic abuse. The database also contains almost 40,000 images.


Big brother or just playing to caution?




posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 10:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by mr-lizard
www.guardian.co.uk...


Documents released under the Freedom of Information Act reveal that police hold intelligence records of millions of people who have not been charged or convicted of any crime. The disclosures show that around 14m Metropolitan police intelligence reports and 38m from other forces, gathered routinely because they may prove useful, are being made available to all police agencies on the Police National Database (PND).

These records are for a variety of different reasons associates of criminals, allegations of crimes, victims of sexual or domestic abuse and people who have attended demonstrations.


Are innocent people being criminalised? Is it right for innocent people to have their data/images/details stored by the police for no good reason?

Is this the shape of things to come?


The Met intelligence files includes details about protesters who have attended demonstrations, unconvicted "persons of interest", associates of criminals, including lists of phone numbers stored on perpetrators' phones, allegations of crimes, and victims of sexual or domestic abuse. The database also contains almost 40,000 images.


Big brother or just playing to caution?



You say the shape of things to come, but this is in full swing and has been for some time. I was subjected to being photographed by a police woman hanging out of a helicopter while at a free party (rave) as far back as 2000. I remember being photographed at a protest rally in 2004 that I only went to because my girlfriend wanted to go (some anti bp or Exxon thing).

This is a clear and present danger. The police hold info on us. Our faces and the fact that we have (what they consider to be) antisocial behaviors.

You aren't free to have a bit of fun without ending up on a list
edit on 21-8-2012 by Lagrimas because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 10:28 AM
link   
As someone in the comments section said:

A government that treats all of its citizens with suspicion isn't fit to govern.



posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 10:49 AM
link   
Add to that the mobile fingerprint machine(BBC news at lunchtime,west midlands I think)which has been trialed.If your not in the system you will be after a nice stop and search' with one of them.Almost certain they will keep the prints,like they have been doing for years with the DNA of people who are charged but never convicted.



posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 11:21 AM
link   
Police wont even look at the data unless you become a person of interest. Of course there would be problems in the event that society detoriates the way we have seen it in Mexico, where police isnt always on the side of law and order.



posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 12:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Cassius666
 


the problem with that is their nice and big definition of a 'person of interest'.



posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 12:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by Cassius666
Police wont even look at the data unless you become a person of interest. Of course there would be problems in the event that society detoriates the way we have seen it in Mexico, where police isnt always on the side of law and order.


With alarming frequency US cops are caught using their various databases for personal reasons ranging from checking up on an ex's new fling, watching their kids and stalking.

Society doenst have to degrade one iota for cops to abuse the system and the people who pay their salaries.

Maybe society degrading will give the cops actual work to do so they wont have time to abuse people left and right.



posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 06:15 PM
link   
reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


And that's a prime example of how data can be abused. The Police officer who killed Ian Tomlinson, PC Harwood also was reputed to have abused such data.

Yet he again got away completely free of all charges. I don't mean to go off topic in my own thread, but since he's a prime example of how a corrupt policeman can get away with murder, then it just shows how vulnerable this system really is.

If a policeman can get away with killing another man, then what are the mediocre penalties of snooping, data-mining and abusing a database of innocent people?





new topics
top topics
 
4

log in

join