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Disney's surveillance technology and YOU!

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posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 09:12 PM
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The new totalitarianism of surveillance technology

A software engineer in my Facebook community wrote recently about his outrage that when he visited Disneyland, and went on a ride, the theme park offered him the photo of himself and his girlfriend to buy – with his credit card information already linked to it. He noted that he had never entered his name or information into anything at the theme park, or indicated that he wanted a photo, or alerted the humans at the ride to who he and his girlfriend were – so, he said, based on his professional experience, the system had to be using facial recognition technology. He had never signed an agreement allowing them to do so, and he declared that this use was illegal. He also claimed that Disney had recently shared data from facial-recognition technology with the United States military.

Yes, I know: it sounds like a paranoid rant.

Except that it turned out to be true. News21, supported by the Carnegie and Knight foundations, reports that Disney sites are indeed controlled by face-recognition technology, that the military is interested in the technology, and that the face-recognition contractor, Identix, has contracts with the US government – for technology that identifies individuals in a crowd.



Except if you follow the link, it's more than just the technology...it's the data.





Disney, Biometrics and the Department of Defense

...Disney Corporation hands over to the DOD all data on their customers. The DOD has an overabundance of information on the general public going back decades thanks to their relationship with Disney.



I don't know...Naomi...the other source... but I still agree highly likely.


Interesting reads nonetheless...
edit on 19-8-2012 by loam because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 09:30 PM
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I don't doubt this. I was at Disneyworld in Oct of 2001 and then Dec. of 2010 with my family. 2001 I thoroughly enjoyed and it why I dropped thousands to do the whole package deal in a Disney resort.

I've never felt so badly screwed in my life and I'll never return to a Disney property of any kind again. Damn shame because I grew up a few miles from Disneyland and virtually grew up in and out of that park.

What changed is just what you're talking about here though. Every time I turned around..and I mean EVERYWHERE...there was another gimmick or scheme or scam to spend just $20 or $50 or $100 more to do this real neat or fun thing. AS if my admission fee was just for laughs... The infernal PINS are the worst. Almost every single employee at Disney has them and they have them to trade...where you'll eventually be along to buy more if they can hook you.

It's absurd but it's not the Magic Kingdom anymore, it's the Corporate Kingdom and for the Corps? Oh it's magic alright.
The Cameras?? That tears it for good. Screw Disney and the mouse they rode in on!

edit on 19-8-2012 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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So. I registered for fantasy football today. Yeah - get over it. The point is, the league is on ESPN. The email I used for registration is a gmail account. The default email they (ESPN) used for my settings page was my old email account from Disney Interactive Studios, a now defunct branch of Disney. I started the league two years ago and left Disney 4 years ago. Disney owns ESPN.

So...some kind of internal data tracking or something is going on here...thought I'd mention it in case someone here was interested...they used old employee information for some kind of datamining software...



This literally happened today.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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I find this part extremely hard to believe


with his credit card information already linked to it


Even if they could do it, I don't think they would risk it being an ultra Tier 1 PCI Retailer.

Not buying it.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


Your example is even more outrageous.

Employment data from your employer was used???



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


I'm confused, which is not at all unusual.


they used old employee information for some kind of datamining software...


Did your work for them?



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by Zarniwoop
 


He's saying ESPN, a Disney subsidiary, had access to his employment files at another Disney subsidiary, where he ended his employment two years prior to having a relationship with ESPN.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by loam
 

Wait... He didn't stay at a Disney hotel or use that credit card anywhere else that day which could have linked into a Disney system somewhere?

Are you suggesting...by his personal experience..that they're going off files up to a couple years old..and originating from employers and other sources totally removed from Disney itself or any of the parks?? THAT is how they linked his face to his credit card to offer him a picture to buy at a ride??

Now THAT is scary... I gotta be missing something here?



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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about 6 years ago at a railway station in scotland a man standing beside me was arrested without doing anything when i asked one of the station staff what he had done he replied that he must have been picked out by the facial recognition cameras that all stations have , I was shocked by this and told a friend who told me that they can even find someone with the chip in your bankcard or cellphone if you go near masts which are everywhere in residential areas and that was 6 years ago ?

edit on 19/8/12 by geobro because: spelling



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:37 PM
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Even if this was true, it seems pretty convenient



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by loam
 


That seems like a lot of work for little gain.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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I'm not buying this at all...

First off, if he didn't want to purchase the pictures then how did he find out they had his credit card info already?

Second, facial recognition technology is not flawless, actually, it is not even near flawless. Because of hats, sun glasses, different facial expressions, and similar looking people, there is no way a corporation would risk linking credit card info to a "recognized" face. What if the credit card is linked to the wrong face? That would put them at risk... It would just be stupid.

This just screams of propaganda to me.
edit on 19-8-2012 by senselessness because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by senselessness
 



Originally posted by senselessness
I'm not buying this at all...

...there is no way a corporation would risk linking credit card info to a "recognized" face. What if the credit card is linked to the wrong face? That would put them at risk... It would just be stupid.

This just screams of propaganda to me.


But it's likely not propaganda.


Facial recognition technology is fairly advanced and works more often than it doesn't.

Moreover, I'm confused why you seem so surprised by the credit card thing?


If you give me your name, DOB, SSN and address (and not all of those things are even always required), I could easily assume every aspect of your financial life...and all from the comfort and convenience of my desk without ever actually having to talk or see anyone!





Silly you don't believe it.

If you don't, you have a lot of reading to do.

edit on 19-8-2012 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2012 @ 12:50 AM
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Originally posted by Zarniwoop
reply to post by MemoryShock
 


I'm confused, which is not at all unusual.


they used old employee information for some kind of datamining software...


Did your work for them?


I worked for them for two years through a Temp agency. I'm guessing when I say "datamining software" but really, that is what it seems like.

I had to sign a non disclosure agreement. They did not apparently...



posted on Aug, 20 2012 @ 12:58 AM
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Originally posted by loam
He's saying ESPN, a Disney subsidiary, had access to his employment files at another Disney subsidiary, where he ended his employment two years prior to having a relationship with ESPN.


That is exactly what I am saying. Funny thing is, the company, Disney Interactive Studios, is now defunct.
 



Originally posted by Zarniwoop
reply to post by loam
 


That seems like a lot of work for little gain.


I don't think you understand. The entire purpose of surveillance software and 'personality profiling' software is to get as much data as possible and then track the emergence of datapoints to construct consumer and surfing habits. There is software specifically designed to crawl the web looking for exact matches. Check out Spokeo.

Disney could have just copied a server (which was no longer being used) and re-appropriated it, or some of the data on it, and there you have it just using old data to profile further with other analytics.

I certainly don't think they intended this though...it's a private email that was work only. I would have been fired if I used it for anything but work...and here it is on a fantasy football site...


Which means that they really just threw all of the information together with the arrogance that there was no way someone would ever know. I swear...so many conspiratorial things happen to me. It's like I'm a freaking punching bag...

 

senseless - Start reading...and I am not interested in the 'it's China not the U.S.' remarks...


www.asia-soft.com...

www.talkafrique.com...
edit on Mon, 20 Aug 2012 01:03:45 -0500 by MemoryShock because: (no reason given)

edit on Mon, 20 Aug 2012 01:05:57 -0500 by MemoryShock because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2012 @ 01:05 AM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 



Originally posted by MemoryShock
I certainly don't think they intended this though...


Why not?

Data just doesn't get mistakenly used in that way.



posted on Aug, 20 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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reply to post by loam
 

I edited to clarify...I think it is a bug in their software...


The goal in my opinion is to have information accessed in a correct fashion...

That said...I wonder where my emails went. There was one in particular that I sent to someone working there that was kind of a big deal to me...
edit on Mon, 20 Aug 2012 01:08:45 -0500 by MemoryShock because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2012 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 



I don't think you understand.


I do understand. I was posting while falling asleep last night, so not following along as good as I should have been.

The whole problem with these invasions of privacy is that they are driven by the almighty dollar. Retailers, online and brick and mortar alike, will spend a lot of money to identify and track customers to remind them to buy their products and services. Most people either do not want to give their personal info, or don't want to spend the time to fill out a form, so there is a huge industry out there to fill in the gaps. I agree that your recent experience is an unintended result of this gap-filling.

Now, back to the OP topic.


A software engineer in my Facebook community wrote recently about his outrage that when he visited Disneyland, and went on a ride, the theme park offered him the photo of himself and his girlfriend to buy – with his credit card information already linked to it.


If this is true, the software engineer could file a class-action lawsuit against Disney for this. California is a staunch supporter of consumer privacy laws... by far, the toughest in the country. It's to the point where some retailers won't even do business in Cali.

Disney would be blatantly violating the Song Beverly Credit Card Act if they linked his credit info to his personal info for this purpose... unless he signed off on some form unknowingly, I guess.

Being a large California retailer, I don't think Disney would risk it. However, this could be a an unintended glitch in their consumer tracking system and there is always an out for first time "mistakes"


Violators of the Song-Beverly Credit Card Act are subject to civil penalties not to exceed two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for the first violation and one thousand dollars ($1,000) for each subsequent violation. However, a penalty will not be assessed if the defendant can show by a preponderance of the evidence that the violation was
unintentional, resulted from a bona fide error and there were procedures designed to avoid the error.


Song Beverly


Check out Spokeo.


Spokeo, and others like it, should be outlawed.


Laws surrounding the use of public records need to be updated as rapidly as the technology that abuses them.
edit on 20-8-2012 by Zarniwoop because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by loam
But it's likely not propaganda.


Facial recognition technology is fairly advanced and works more often than it doesn't.



Actually, facial recognition technology is not that advanced, and it DOESN'T work more often than it does. They still can't overcome incorrect lighting, and facial similarity, let alone trying to do advanced facial recognition on a low resolution camera, and a moving subject. The best facial recognition is with high resolution cameras and a dedicated head shot and profile shot of the person meant for measuring the face. Trying to do it without a person realizing it just sets the system up for failure.



Originally posted by loam
Moreover, I'm confused why you seem so surprised by the credit card thing?


If you give me your name, DOB, SSN and address (and not all of those things are even always required), I could easily assume every aspect of your financial life...and all from the comfort and convenience of my desk without ever actually having to talk or see anyone!





Silly you don't believe it.

If you don't, you have a lot of reading to do.


You have completely missed my point, and read me incorrectly.

Of course, with personal information like name, SSN, DOB, address, etc. you could possibly get my credit card info, I know that. The part I don't believe is a database of "facialprints" which is linked to credit card info that can be queried based on a facial recognition cameras and software. There are just too many similar faces, and incorrect facial readings to do such a thing. The technology is not perfect, and I don't see anyone risking linking incorrect credit card info on a system that is not perfect.



posted on Aug, 20 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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The Failures Of Facial Recognition Software: Drivers Losing Licenses For Looking Like Terrorists

epic.org...


Boston's Logan Airport ran two separate facial recognition system tests at its security checkpoints using volunteers posing as terrorists over a three-month period and posted disappointing results. Throughout the testing period, the systems correctly identified the volunteers 153 times and failed to identify the volunteers 96 times. As a result of the lackluster success rate of only 61.4 percent, the airport decided to explore other technologies for securing its checkpoints.


This has some good info in the beginning about the lack of accuracy in facial recognition:
electronics.howstuffworks.com...


Just a couple of examples of facial recognition not being reliable.



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