It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

1984 Trislander UFO Collision / Crash - Case Solved ;

page: 1
5

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 09:14 AM
link   
The case dating back to 24 august 1984 involved a Trislander aircraft took place over Ipswich UK. whilst on a flight from Stansted to Amsterdam.There have been a few investigation's of this incident namely Jenny Randles of BUFORA whos book on this case can be viewed on the link below the quoted text.




On the 24 august 1984 an air accident involving a UFO and a Trislander aircraft took place over Ipswich UK. whilst on a flight from Stansted to Amsterdam, the pilot (who has not been named) encountered slight turbulance at around 5,000ft when he felt a "bump", he checked his aerodynamics and all seemed to be working ok (so the flight was continued). As he was approaching Amsterdam, he discovered a problem with the right hand engine controls. Upon landing the aircraft was inspected and found to have extensive damage to the left hand propeller, fuselage, cowling and control runs. There were also 3 piece's of foreign metallic objects found, one of them magnetic. Read more: uforesearchnetwork.proboards.com...#ixzz23iYhvJvW


link; en.calameo.com...




The conclusion is that the foreign objects were identified as part of a Motorola MX 300 series hand held transceiver. The relevant Addendum AAIB Bulletin 10/84 - 11/84 can be viewed at this link:;

link; www.aaib.gov.uk...


Credit has to go to the researchers of the on line UFO forum called UFORN at this link below who researched this caes and found the missing link to it.

link ; uforesearchnetwork.proboards.com...#ixzz23i41Y8rH




posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 09:59 AM
link   
reply to post by K-PAX-PROT
 


Thanks. I read your post and the obvious question to me was:

"How does a motorola mx 320 handset reach an altitude of 5000 feet to be able to collide with the propeller at that altitude?"

Fortunately your source answered that question:


Due to the negligence of an aircraft loader, leaving his radio in an airvent, he created a UFO Incident out of nothing. (not knowingly of course). When the A/C reached 5000 ft above Ipswich about 25 minutes into the flight, it levelled out causing the radio (picture of motorola mx 320 above) to slide forward and into the propeller, causing the damage stated in the pilot report, an inventory at the loaders office found some radios to be missing.

This case is now relabeled an IFM (Identified Flying Motorola)
IFM


I like their sense of humor.
I'm not sure how the radio slid forward though. Does the propeller generate positive pressure near the tip and negative pressure near the shaft? That might do it, but normally you'd think stuff on an airplane would blow backward, and not forward like that radio apparently did.

PS the second link (the gov.uk.... link) was not valid.
edit on 16-8-2012 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 10:48 AM
link   
An obscure plane accident from 1984 that nobody has heard of is solved

Thanks for that



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 11:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by dashdespatch
An obscure plane accident from 1984 that nobody has heard of is solved

Thanks for that


Thanks for the some what haste generalisation of the terms you used like the following "obscure" well it is NOT obscure to those who have looked at various cases involving air craft encounters with unknown objects and also your "nobody has heard of", again not to those who are aware of such cases of this nature.Thanks for the rather assuming generalisations though.This case is listed on the ATS "UFO Chronicle Directory Thread " by the way and if any information on these cases comes to light to either solve or add new twists to those existing UFO cases then should it not be highlighted to those who HAVE heard of cases like this.Deny ignorance is the ATS signature after all.

edit on 15/07/2010 by K-PAX-PROT because: deny ignorance

edit on 15/07/2010 by K-PAX-PROT because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 11:23 AM
link   

Originally posted by Arbitrageur
reply to post by K-PAX-PROT
 


Thanks. I read your post and the obvious question to me was:

"How does a motorola mx 320 handset reach an altitude of 5000 feet to be able to collide with the propeller at that altitude?"

Fortunately your source answered that question:


Due to the negligence of an aircraft loader, leaving his radio in an airvent, he created a UFO Incident out of nothing. (not knowingly of course). When the A/C reached 5000 ft above Ipswich about 25 minutes into the flight, it levelled out causing the radio (picture of motorola mx 320 above) to slide forward and into the propeller, causing the damage stated in the pilot report, an inventory at the loaders office found some radios to be missing.

This case is now relabeled an IFM (Identified Flying Motorola)
IFM


I like their sense of humor.
I'm not sure how the radio slid forward though. Does the propeller generate positive pressure near the tip and negative pressure near the shaft? That might do it, but normally you'd think stuff on an airplane would blow backward, and not forward like that radio apparently did.

PS the second link (the gov.uk.... link) was not valid.
edit on 16-8-2012 by Arbitrageur because: clarification




Hi cheers for the feed back ,yes i see your point of the radio sliding back mmm, good point, if that is the case then there is a case for this incident to remain unsolved.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 03:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by K-PAX-PROT
Hi cheers for the feed back ,yes i see your point of the radio sliding back mmm, good point, if that is the case then there is a case for this incident to remain unsolved.
I not trying to make a case for it being unsolved.

The radio was clearly identified, and there was a radio missing from inventory, so there seems to be no doubt the radio was the cause.

I was just curious about a minor detail of the case. If we had a graph of the pressure gradient of that propeller design while in flight at 5000 ft that might clearly show why the radio was pulled forward if there's a low pressure area near the shaft as I suspect there might be. I did a quick search to look for that pressure gradient information but didn't find it, and it may vary by the propeller design/aircraft. But without evidence such as that, my idea is that air gets pushed back at the propeller tips, and that air has to come from somewhere, such as in front of the propeller or maybe near the shaft area of the propeller which is what could create the low pressure near the shaft and "suck" the radio forward. So I suspect that could be what happened, I just can't prove it, though I can't say I spent much time searching. This type of thing may be common knowledge to aeronautical engineers and almost certainly would be for those who design propellers, however I would think propeller designers would want to minimize such an effect to the extent possible.

The story implies it's related to the aircraft transition from the climb to level flight, and it's possible a closer look at the vent the radio was stowed in might explain why this occurred.

One could also say the aircraft was level at the beginning of takeoff, so why didn't it happen during takeoff?

These are just things I'm curious about. But minor questions about the exact aerodynamic mechanisms don't make me doubt the conclusion that the radio solves the case.


edit on 16-8-2012 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



new topics

top topics
 
5

log in

join