Mississipp​i - The Birthplace Of American Music. Yes!

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posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


awesome choice.. really highlights the traditional blues style.

American deep south negro spiritual







edit on 16-8-2012 by WhisperingWinds because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by WhisperingWinds
 

I glad you liked it. The southern negro experience spawned some of the most beautiful music ever. It's amazing that such beauty could result from such negativity. Says so much about the human spirit.

There is a song called "Strange Fruit" about the experience of seeing a lynching.
One of the best versions is by Nina Simone. I won't post it here because it is quite graphic and disturbing, but if you are interested a quick search on Ytube will find it.

I will try to find a more suitable song by Nina to post, she is one of my favorites. A voice unlike any other.

Here you go.

edit on 16-8-2012 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)


Thievery Corporation remixed this recording and did a great job of preserving the mood but adding some groove polish.
edit on 16-8-2012 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by DaphneApollo
reply to post by Astyanax
 


That is what this thread is about..Education.. Thanks for your well thought out and informational post.

I would say "ALL" music comes from God. But, why don't you post some examples of the music spoken about in your post. Some African music that shows a connection to all your points.

I found this video which explains "Negro Spiritual" and the Black Notes (slave Scale) and the white keys (white spirituals) This man teaches something educational. Matter of fact my mom sent me this video when it had only 100 views and I made the first comment on it. Stating that it should go 'Viral' which it did. Now, views are over millions. Amazing Grace is my very favorite spiritual. The way he explains and sings this song gave me chills.

Wintley Phipps Sings Amazing Grace at Carnegie Hall


edit on 16-8-2012 by DaphneApollo because: (no reason given)


You are so right D-A, I originally came to this site while researching something and have lurked ever since. There seem to be a lot of well informed people who contribute. This post caused me to rethink my ideas about musical origins. Left me wanting to here more from this poster.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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Olu Dara / Harlem Country Girl / Source : In The World From Natchez To New York (Atlantic - 1998) ...
This man is so smooth....ummm....I love it.

OLU DARA - Harlem Country Girl


Olu Dara - Neighborhoods - Bluebird


OLU DARA - Your Lips - LIVE
edit on 16-8-2012 by DaphneApollo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 08:26 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 





You are so right D-A, I originally came to this site while researching something and have lurked ever since. There seem to be a lot of well informed people who contribute. This post caused me to rethink my ideas about musical origins. Left me wanting to here more from this poster.


This is why I opened the thread with African-American musicians in the OP. , and shown how across the pond that this music influenced the British too. If I had prefaced this thread with "Elvis' was the beginning of MS and American music that would have been a huge lie. But, I will say that the Eastern shore of America was influenced also by Celtic/Gaelic music too through the immigrants coming to this country. They are both singing about the same thing opportunities hoped for/ oppression/hard times and love (either lost or found) Life, gotta roll with it.

I like learning something new. I would like to hear more contributions from this poster for sure. After all, we're all in this "Stone Soup" together and when all the ingredients come together, it gets mighty tasty then add some masala spice and we're all good.


Edit to add: That song by Thievery Corporation/Nina Simone would go good in my thread here:
House, Trance And Chillout Music.
If you care to participate...
edit on 16-8-2012 by DaphneApollo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by DaphneApollo
 


Harlem Country Girl, I love this song, have not heard it in a while. I heard a live version of this on a really great radio station here (WWOZ) and it made me melt. The way the lyrics are pinned to the melody is very unusual. Smooth is the right word.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 08:56 PM
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Originally posted by tanda7
reply to post by DaphneApollo
 


Harlem Country Girl, I love this song, have not heard it in a while. I heard a live version of this on a really great radio station here (WWOZ) and it made me melt. The way the lyrics are pinned to the melody is very unusual. Smooth is the right word.

I'm still listening to it now. This is my first time ever hearing this. You don't need any mood altering props with this stuff. It is mello, takes the edge right off. I could sleep with this stuff on.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by DaphneApollo
reply to post by tanda7
 





You are so right D-A, I originally came to this site while researching something and have lurked ever since. There seem to be a lot of well informed people who contribute. This post caused me to rethink my ideas about musical origins. Left me wanting to here more from this poster.


This is why I opened the thread with African-American musicians in the OP. , and shown how across the pond that this music influenced the British too. If I had prefaced this thread with "Elvis' was the beginning of MS and American music that would have been a huge lie.

I like learning something even if others may deem them a "troll" which is thrown around here willy nilly. I would like to hear more contributions from this poster for sure. After all, we're all in this "Stone Soup" together and when all the ingredients come together, it gets mighty tasty then add some masala spice and we're all good.


Edit to add: That song by Thievery Corporation/Nina Simone would go good in my thread here:
House, Trance And Chillout Music.
If you care to participate...
edit on 16-8-2012 by DaphneApollo because: (no reason given)

Okay I'll have a look. I actually play more of that at my house than anything else, mainly because of the way people (or at least my friends) respond to it. It is perfect for entertaining. Sets a great mood without monopolizing everyone's attention. I find when I play well known popular music, it polarizes the group, people love it or hate it. But when I play Thievery or Kruder&Dorfmeister etc., it doesn't hook peoples attention too much and everyone seems to enjoy it even if they have never heard it.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


Kruder&Dorfmeister ......never heard this artist before.

Have to look them up...



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by DaphneApollo
reply to post by tanda7
 


Kruder&Dorfmeister ......never heard this artist before.

Have to look them up...

Have some of this

They like to take old recordings and compose around them. They do Billie Holiday, Sara Vaughn, many more.
edit on 16-8-2012 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)

I may be confusing them with another band as far as Billie H and Sara V are concerned but they do plenty of great remixes of old stuff
edit on 16-8-2012 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)
edit on 16-8-2012 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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Paul Davis - Sweet Life (1977) Meridian, MS



Cool Night
edit on 16-8-2012 by DaphneApollo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


Love that Depeche Mode remix. I used to keep this cd on repeat....love it...

I have this album....Depeche Mode....my very favorites.

edit on 16-8-2012 by DaphneApollo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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Did not realize Paul Davis was from MS, haven't heard those songs in a long time. I don't usually go for the "story teller" type stuff but every now and then I hear a song that gets my attention. There is a song by John Anderson called "The Good", I can't find it on Ytube but I've seen this song make grown men cry. It was actually written by Bobby Braddock but John Anderson performs it on his "Country till I die" album. Strange that I can't find any version of it online nor can I find the lyrics. It's crazy to me that a song can actually cause a chemical reaction that powerful.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


Could it be this song - You Can't Keep a Good Memory Down lyrics



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by DaphneApollo
reply to post by tanda7
 


Could it be this song - You Can't Keep a Good Memory Down lyrics


No that's not it. The song is actually a very happy song. The first verse is about a man who has aged and is really not that special, but his wife still sees him like he was in high school.
The second verse is about his wife who also is aging and physically far away from her 18 year old self. But of course when looks at her .......... etc. .



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 10:36 PM
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Marshall Drew Band, blues, Clarksdale, MS, Ground Zero Blues Sample...
Just my personal opinion, I think his voice is off key. This is live of course.

edit on 16-8-2012 by DaphneApollo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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Classic John Anderson, with great lyrics.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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Mickey Gilley - You Don't Know Me Natchez, MS




posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by DaphneApollo
 

Mickey Gillie's from Natchez?! Didn't know that. Always assumed he was from TX because of his bar and all.

I'm amazed how many famous musicians were born in this state. MS is roughly 47,000 square miles. I challenge anyone to show us any comparable sized area, anywhere, that has produced more.

By the way The Marshal Drew Band got the attention of everyone in the house. Big applause.


edit on 16-8-2012 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)


I just realized England is roughly 50,000 square miles. I retract the challenge.
edit on 17-8-2012 by tanda7 because: didn't think it through



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 12:50 AM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


Can we conclude that all music has it's roots in Africa?

Music is a human universal. All cultures and peoples have music. Because of this, biologists and anthropologists have long suspected that music serves an adaptive function of some kind – that human beings need it to survive and reproduce – and that the origins of music are older than those of language. We could sing before we could talk.


We must suppose that the rhythms and cadences of oratory are derived from previously developed musical powers. We can thus understand how it is that music, dancing, song, and poetry are such very ancient arts. We may go even further than this, and, as remarked in a former chapter, believe that musical sounds afforded one of the bases for the development of language.

– Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, Chapter 19

Modern research has strongly borne out Darwin's intuition – as you may read, if you like, in Steven Mithen's book, The Singing Neanderthals. This review of Mithen's book by the University of Washington anthropologist Ellen Dissanayake, gives an incidental survey of modern work on the subject.

Science tells us humankind originated in Africa, spreading out from that continent to colonize the rest of the world. If we could sing before we could talk, then music, too, must have emerged, originally, in Africa. Naturally, this does not mean all musical sounds, scales, rhythms, etc., were invented there; the music of Mississippi is not the music of Mali; the sound of Nashville is not the sound of the Nuba.





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