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Mars Curiosity has gone curiously dark? No new raw photos for 5 days now...

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posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by Darkblade71
reply to post by abeverage
 


Did you see the hi res image off of your link showing where curiosity landed? That's crazy details on the image. Right down to 24 in per pixel.

Thanks for the link!


Certainly!




posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by miniatus
 


Thanks for the accurate information. With all the speculation and guessing going on about this rover it is good to have someone on top of things.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by sprtpilot
Think people. Software update? How does that remotely make sense? Just downloading updates over the internet frequently results in corruptions, incomplete file transfers, and buff buff buffering problems. We are supposed to believe they have to "update software" remotely (to say the least) just days after landing?


I had figured it took a dirt nap! But had honestly forgotten it was getting an upgrade hope everything looks the same when it is awake again



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by abeverage
reply to post by miniatus
 


Aw crap I do remember hearing it was getting a software upgrade, well hopefully it works!

These probes usually have a "safe mode" (much like your computer does). If something goes wrong with the install, the rover could probably enter this safe mode while they try a reinstall, or while engineers try to find the problem.

By the way, there are two computers -- a primary and a backup. I think I heard the NASA software engineer in the press conference say they would install it on one, and then the other (I guess they will test the primary before installing it on the backup).



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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Software update?

Update with what? What info have they gathered at this point that couldn't be programmed during the preparations, or sent during the journey over there?

Makes no sense to me.
edit on 14-8-2012 by MightyPenfriend because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by abeverage
reply to post by miniatus
 


Aw crap I do remember hearing it was getting a software upgrade, well hopefully it works!

These probes usually have a "safe mode" (much like your computer does). If something goes wrong with the install, the rover could probably enter this safe mode while they try a reinstall, or while engineers try to find the problem.

By the way, there are two computers -- a primary and a backup. I think I heard the NASA software engineer in the press conference say they would install it on one, and then the other (I guess they will test the primary before installing it on the backup).



I am in IT I know how it works...or often doesn't. We always test an upgrade virtually then go live. I just forgot it was getting one.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by MightyPenfriend
Software update?

Update with what? What info have they gathered at this point that couldn't be programmed during the preparations, or sent during the journey over there?

Makes no sense to me.
edit on 14-8-2012 by MightyPenfriend because: (no reason given)


They were sent during the journey over there. Turning them on however is best not done when you're travelling at tens of thousands of mph through space.

Do you really think NASA is stupid enough not to know how to handle their own software updates?



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by miniatus

Originally posted by sprtpilot
Think people. Software update? How does that remotely make sense? Just downloading updates over the internet frequently results in corruptions, incomplete file transfers, and buff buff buffering problems. We are supposed to believe they have to "update software" remotely (to say the least) just days after landing?


it makes perfect sense .. why wouldn't it? .. they were talking about the software updates well in advance of it happening.. it's basically taking the software used for the landing procedures and initial touch down for diagnostics, systems checks and all of that.. and replacing it with a system geared for navigating, exploring and completing all of the various mission tasks..

Spirit and Opportunity have gone through this.. Opportunity was given artificial intelligence in it's last update.

Keep in mind that curiosity has two identical "brains" .. there's a complete fail safe in case of corruption
edit on 8/14/2012 by miniatus because: (no reason given)


I agree it does make perfect sense, BUT:
I do partly wonder why not have the software update already on the rover? Especially since they knew they were going to have to do the reinstall , in order to switch to explorer mode from survival mode.


Maybe the software upgrade is dependent on the feedback from the landing and the initial observation, and their the reason for the remote upgrade? I don't think storage was the issue but maybe it was?



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by exponent
 


And that takes 4-5 days?

Are they also using Windows?

Of what information does this update actually consist?




They were sent during the journey over there. Turning them on however is best not done when you're travelling at tens of thousands of mph through space.


Because what? Computers don't work in these conditions? What about the flight computers and such? Don't they work either during flight?
edit on 14-8-2012 by MightyPenfriend because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by interupt42
 





I don't think storage was the issue but maybe it was?


I assume the size of the harddrive didn't grow during the way over, and software weighs nothing so I don't think so.
edit on 14-8-2012 by MightyPenfriend because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by MightyPenfriend
And that takes 4-5 days?

Apparently so.


Are they also using Windows?

Of what information does this update actually consist?

Why don't you ask them rather than asking me? You just seem to be searching for a reason to express your cynicism.


Because what? Computers don't work in these conditions? What about the flight computers and such? Don't they work either during flight?
edit on 14-8-2012 by MightyPenfriend because: (no reason given)

Why would you risk something going wrong? The estimated lifetime of Curiosity is 2 years, spending a week doing a slow and careful check of every system without any risk of it slamming into the surface at 400mph seems a pretty small price to pay.

When you go out to drive your car on a long journey do you check all the tyres, the fluid levels? Do you do this while driving?



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by exponent
 


I am not for one side or the here, I just would like to know somthing that doesn't add up to me. You seem to know what's going on so I just randomly picked you to ask.

Why would the "rover" need nav data etc.? It isn't doing the flying, the "ship" "capsule" whatever is doing the flying. It is the payload, thus a rider on the bus. Satellites don't need nav data to control the space shuttle, they just ride to orbit.

As such, I don't understand why it would need to install a different OS. The main body of the entry vehichle should have been doing the work, not the payload. And since it already did its job they just sent it sailing away to crash and rust on the ground away from the rover.

So why would the rover need astrogation? It isn't the space ship for transport, it isn't the main enrty vehichle that deposited the rover on the ground and then flew off to commit suicide. It is just a glorified remote controlled car. So what gives?

A technical explanation is fine, I don't need laymans terms. I am fairly knowledgable about a lot of these things, but didn't pay much attention or really research it, as I was bbetting it would follow the odds and burn. Looks like I was wrong on that one. Go humanity, back at 50% on mars landings! Yay!

Thanks in advance for the help, I just want to understand what the situation is.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by MightyPenfriend
 

As I said, they are reoptimizing the computers for roving procedures rather than spaceflight and landing procedures (considering the spaceflight and landing is done).
'
The software that was up and running for spceflight and landing is being put aside, and the software used for roving is being installed and switched on. This swapping of the cruising/landing application with the roving application will make the computers run more efficiently, rather than having both applications already installed and running simultaneously.

Think of it this way: if you had microsoft word running on your computer, but you know yo no longer were going to need microsoft word, would you keep that application open on your desktop? You probably wouldn't, considering it would slow down the other applications and draw power.

As for why it's taking so long, that is for a few reasons:

First, they need to install and test the installation on the primary computer, then install and test the installation on the backup computer. Testing takes time.

Secondly, the communication lines between the rover and Earth are not always open "24/7" (this is due to sightlines between earth and the rover, and the availability of the communication relay spacecraft in mars orbit (usually the Mars Odyssey Orbiter). So sending instructions to the rovers, then waiting for the rover to confirm that it is following those instructions takes even MORE time, because they aren't in constant communication with it.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by exponent
 





Why don't you ask them rather than asking me? You just seem to be searching for a reason to express your cynicism.


Because you qouted my post and replied to it? I sure didn't start talking to you.




Why would you risk something going wrong? The estimated lifetime of Curiosity is 2 years, spending a week doing a slow and careful check of every system without any risk of it slamming into the surface at 400mph seems a pretty small price to pay.


What about my other question?

What are they updating that couldn't have been programmed before hand. Why would anything go wrong with it, other computer on board are obviously running the whole time.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 





As I said, they are reoptimizing the computers for roving procedures rather than spaceflight and landing procedures (considering the spaceflight and landing is done). ' The software that was up and running for spceflight and landing is being put aside, and the software used for roving is being installed and switched on. This swapping of the cruising/landing application with the roving application will make the computers run more efficiently, rather than having both applications already installed and running simultaneously.


Thank you. At least that is an explanation that makes some sense.
edit on 14-8-2012 by MightyPenfriend because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by MightyPenfriend
 

It makes sense to have the update procedures and capability available, but I guess I kind of reflect your "wtf?" I'm a hobbyist programmer, NOT an IT professional. But I thnk that updating anything at this juncture is sketchy and hard to understand. Having this as an option is obviously beneficial, but depending on it would be another matter. Software of this nature shouldn't depend on updates... This is $2.5 billion worth of investment and any error or bug can cost the mission. You don't want to overcomplicate things. You want less things to do, not more. You want lots of redundancy too.

I don't think there's a conspiracy behind it. Just don't understand completely. I know they'll probably have their reasons. I keep thinking of games and how many of them are buggy on release. Most of them depend on patches early on. Some of the greatest games in history required patches. When I was in school, my teacher told me that retail software (games or not) shouldn't depend on patches. I kind of took what he said to heart. So the idea that Curiosity is updating itself during the mission is weird. I just keep thinking of how this process must add to the missions complexity.
edit on 14-8-2012 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by inverslyproportional
 

The entry, descent, and landing was controlled by the computer on the rover.

There is no point in having the weight of a second computer controlling the cruise and EDL when the rover's computer could do the job.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by jonnywhite
 





I don't think there's a conspiracy behind it. Just don't understand completely. I know they'll probably have their reasons. I keep thinking of games and how many of them are buggy on release...


I am not saying that either. I am just critical of every bit of info we get.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Thanks for the prompt response soylent, I guess that makes sense though as evvery pound costs a million dollars to lift out of the gravity well and space limitations etc.

I am really just chomping at the bit waiting for some new pics and info, so I figured I would ask for an explanation about my only question.

Except why can't they be godlike in their ability to feed me the data I want any faster. Bastards, just seems like when your favorite band waits until the crowd is about to lose their minds before finally coming out on stage.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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People need to learn to be patient...

This is a mission which is planned to last 2 years - do not expect amazing scientific discoveries within a day or two. Things need time.

Today, i was listening to that NASA conference on the web and i remember someone saying it will need 100 days alone just to travel to Mt. Sharp. (Correct me if i am wrong!)

The images do not really have particular scientific value, yes they are cool to look at etc. but i consider them more a courtesy and nice "side-effect", but the scientists are more likely interested in their experiments than having a priority on cool Mars landscape pictures


That being said, i still find it amazing how NASA is updating anyone willing to learn and interested in this, they did a fantastic job (IMO) starting with the coverage of the landing, daily updates of images...webcasts of NASA conferences etc..etc...it's so interesting!

Think back...what was in early days, when we brought the first Mars probes up there - before we had the internet?

All we had was maybe a shallow report in the evening news or in the paper with ONE picture or two..with some added simplified blahblah for the news - if someone was REALLY interested in all this they had to wait months until they could get more information and pics from some scientific publication.

Today, we can literally attend this stuff "live" and get all the images and info we want right away, right on our computers. So dont be impatient and freak just because there is 3 day delay because of software update.
edit on 14-8-2012 by flexy123 because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-8-2012 by flexy123 because: (no reason given)




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