It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Anonymizer 'anonymous email' owned by Trapwire's Cubic Corporation

page: 1
17

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:32 PM
link   

Anonymizer 'anonymous email' owned by Trapwire's Cubic Corporation


www.disclose.tv

Beware, Anonymizer, the company that brings you free anonymous email facilities, called nyms, as well as similar secure services used by activists all over the world, is actually owned by Cubic Corporations, the parent company that owns Abraxis, which in turn owns Trapwire. So, it’s possible, if not probable that all those activists around the world who believe their emails are safe may well be sending messages that go straight into Trapwire, the surveillance system that monitors activists. This could be lifted straight out of a political conspiracy movie – but it isn’t. Furthermore, Cub
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.cubic.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
2020 Neural Chip Implant. Fact or Fiction?




posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:32 PM
link   
So this particular connection is a bit more interesting then originally meets the eye. Yes, it is mildly concerning that some of the tech (not all of it mind you) being used by anons is being fed back to the beast. Though I would imagine that this is known in the circles of anons that diive into corporate systems.

No, the interesting connection is the fact that Trapwire is essentially owned by Cubic Corporation which I was looking at in 2007 (prompted by a very old thread from this site; linked below) and an interesting couple of things.

First of all, the CEO, Walter J. Zable, died on June 30th. This was well after the Statfor files had been released and after the penultimate 'they' probably realized that Trapwire would be leaked. Seriously, if the nsa or whatever decides to DDOS wikileaks for five days straight then the death of the CEO should come as kind of meaningful - so I think Trapwire is a very big deal and there is something that links Trapwire to something bigger.

Well, perhaps Cubic Corp is that link.



Ronald Kane, Vice President of CUBIC Corp., a major manufacturer of implantable chips, while remarking on the chips profitability, has said, "If we had our way, we'd implant a chip behind everyone's ear in the maternity ward".


The above quote has been associated with the infamous 2020 IBM Neural Implant article and takes on something more of a paranoid conspiracy theory in light of Trapwire's exposure and the fact that Cubic Corp is an international provider of Smart Cards and RFID.

Regarding the CEO's death, I understand that I am offering a tenuous connection but I really think that there is something akin to too much of a coincidence, especially since this topic does not want exposure in any way shape or form.

Isn't it funny that we are seeing old 'conspiracy theories' which were written off coming back with new zest?

www.disclose.tv
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:33 PM
link   
if you want anon email just go hidemyass then go to mailinator.

Thats what i do anyway
edit on 14-8-2012 by definity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:34 PM
link   
TOR, be anon with any email service...



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:46 PM
link   
I'm kind of more interested in the surveillance focus of Cubic corp and how they may have applied it using those aforementioned implants (the tech for which has likely evolved past the 'rice sized' examples of the 2020 neural implant)...



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 02:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by benrl
TOR, be anon with any email service...

Fewer and fewer email services allow for onion routing access. FYI.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 02:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by benrl
TOR, be anon with any email service...


Using tor for e-mail isn't smart unless you're absolutely sure the mail server you connect to supports SSL ..

If you connect to a standard e-mail service using plain smtp over tor then your credentials are being passed in plain text.. there are a lot of tor exit nodes ( anyone can be an exit node .. it's an option in the tor software ) .. harvest passwords for email and other services..

Tor is only safe if the person using it knows what they are doing .. it's usually not wise to do anything outside of the tor network ( connecting to a non-tor service like even ats ) that involves authenticating or providing any identifying information =)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 02:44 PM
link   
reply to post by miniatus
 




Tor is only safe if the person using it knows what they are doing .. it's usually not wise to do anything outside of the tor network ( connecting to a non-tor service like even ats ) that involves authenticating or providing any identifying information =)

Thanks for the info. I was unaware that you cannot access ATS using the ToR services.

Then again, you could be wrong; have you tried it?



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 02:50 PM
link   
reply to post by QuantumQuackers
 


You can access ATS, however what he is saying is that it wouldn't be wise to login using TOR to an account made by a non-tor browser. Your IP used to set up your ATS account is your true IP, unless you have previously masked it. Law enforcement can see that you logged in using TOR as well as your original IP, and possibly link your TOR use to your personal information.

I hope I explained that right. I don't use TOR, but I believe everyone online these days should have an understanding of it.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 02:52 PM
link   
reply to post by miniatus
 




there are a lot of tor exit nodes ( anyone can be an exit node .. it's an option in the tor software ) .. harvest passwords for email and other services..

I will assume that is an opinion since it is impossible for you to serve up definitive research that this is the case.

True, ToR exit nodes see plaintext as your email content is decrypted when passed to the target URL. However, exit nodes doe not acquire your originating IP address (or similar information) which is, ultimately, what ToR is about.

ToR is an anonymity service not a tool for privacy.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 02:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by Dreamer99
reply to post by QuantumQuackers
 


You can access ATS, however what he is saying is that it wouldn't be wise to login using TOR to an account made by a non-tor browser. Your IP used to set up your ATS account is your true IP, unless you have previously masked it. Law enforcement can see that you logged in using TOR as well as your original IP, and possibly link your TOR use to your personal information.


I don't see how LEO can do this unless they are operating the ToR exit node which is a real possibility. I use the term possibility instead of probability simply in the sheer number of ToR [exit] nodes that exist.


Originally posted by Dreamer99
I hope I explained that right. I don't use TOR, but I believe everyone online these days should have an understanding of it.


Few do. many who believe they do, don't.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 03:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by QuantumQuackers

I don't see how LEO can do this unless they are operating the ToR exit node which is a real possibility. I use the term possibility instead of probability simply in the sheer number of ToR [exit] nodes that exist.


You're right, and I'm probably a little bit paranoid of tor based on my own unfamiliarity with it. The moment I heard that anyone can run an exit node and potentially capture information, I felt put off by the idea. Overall the chain seems strong but that one link needs to be made stronger. I'm just glad that I don't see any reason I would need to use the service.


Originally posted by QuantumQuackers

Few do. many who believe they do, don't.


That can apply to so many topics, as I've learned in my time here on ATS. Never trust a self proclaimed expert.


A little bit more on topic, do you think that companies such as Abraxis might set up exit nodes as a way of spying on tor users? Their reach seems pretty vast, and their methods already suspect. Or is something like that akin to urinating on a fire to put it out?



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:09 PM
link   
reply to post by Dreamer99
 



A little bit more on topic, do you think that companies such as Abraxis might set up exit nodes as a way of spying on tor users? Their reach seems pretty vast, and their methods already suspect. Or is something like that akin to urinating on a fire to put it out?

I have run and do continue to run ToR nodes and ToR exit nodes although the latter has been more problematic. Enjoying being disconnected from my ISP for "running a server on a residential account" is not my concept of a good time.

Those involved in the ToR community in any depth generally agree that the existence of Abraxis-like ToR exit nodes are 100%. They would continue with the claim that the various international intelligence services also run such nodes. Again 100%.

Keep in mind, although ONI has not written - as best we know - any code for ToR in ages, ToR was first an intelligence project - a way for people to transmit information across the Internet without resolving their personal information and encrypting the content of these transmissions. This includes academicians and spies alike.


What does this mean? It means that using Tor as a anonymity service is a solid option. Did I answer your question?



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 05:06 PM
link   
reply to post by QuantumQuackers
 


Yeah, definitely answered my question. Thanks.

It's scary to imagine the tools that people use to stay anonymous online being used against them, as the OP illustrates. However it's apparent that people need to ask questions about the services they use; who really provides them, and why.

At least there's still tor, though. At the very least it makes the possibility of being tracked and spied on a lot more remote, it seems.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 05:53 PM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


My recollection is hidemyass will cooperate with law enforcement. But your scheme is good enough to say hide from Google, which is virtually the CIA and NSA combined. The mailinator website is a great service.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 08:31 AM
link   
Back on topic.

Ever since WikiLeaks began releasing a series of documents about the surveillance system Trapwire, there’s been a panicked outcry over this supposedly all-seeing, revolutionary spy network. In fact, there are any number of companies that say they comb through video feeds or suspicious activity reports in largely the same way that Trapwire claims to do.

What’s truly extraordinary about Trapwire was how it was marketed by the private intelligence firm Stratfor, whose internal e-mails WikiLeaks exposed.

The documents show Stratfor being less than straight with its clients, using temporary jobs in government to set up Trapwire contracts, and calling it all a “wet dream.”


That’s a breach of trust and possibly worse, says Matthew Aid, author of Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror. “It’s a conflict of interest.”

“If I was one of Stratfor’s business clientele or government clientele, I’d be a little alarmed or a little confused or both,” adds Aid, a former executive at the private intelligence firm Kroll Associates. ”If you don’t tell the people who are paying for your products caveat emptor [buyer beware] … that’s constructive fraud, to use a legal term.”



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 11:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by QuantumQuackers
What’s truly extraordinary about Trapwire was how it was marketed by the private intelligence firm Stratfor, whose internal e-mails WikiLeaks exposed.


Completely. Consider the following quote from Burton himself revealed when the email was decrypted -



"“We need to laser focus pieces to capture their attn. Maybe even a video,” Burton adds. “Trust me, the agents and cops watching the TW feed WANT something interesting to see.”


This is akin to calling for the staging of an event to demonstrate the validity of the trapwire usage - which means they have to stage something with enough of a criminal nature to get attention.

The implications of these emails are huge...



new topics




 
17

log in

join