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U.S. drought sparks calls for emergency meeting on soaring food prices

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posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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U.S. drought sparks calls for emergency meeting on soaring food prices


www.thestar.com

PARIS- France, the United States and G20 president Mexico will hold a conference call at the end of August to discuss whether an emergency international meeting is required to tackle soaring grain prices caused by the worst U.S. drought in half a century.

A French agriculture ministry official said the call would decide whether to convene the first meeting of the G20’s Rapid Response Forum...
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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Things are getting serious now, and we can see that the global leadership is getting very nervous. This tells you that whatever you are hearing about how much food there is and how bad the drought is, its almost certainly worse.

True, this is just news about a "meeting about a meeting," but don't let that fool you. The article goes on to note that the rapid response forum could be called into action as soon as the beginning of September. That's not that far off. Large, international bodies like the G20 almost NEVER spring into action all together that quickly unless the situation is serious.

I'm hearing anecdotal evidence of soaring food prices coming in from all over the world. With both global breadbaskets - America and Russia - hard-hit by drought and down for the count, could even worse news be on the way?

www.thestar.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 8/13/2012 by silent thunder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


They have to do something to stave off unrest. Food is the main driver of social unrest. It is why many years ago Nixon worked to get food prices off the table during his re-election campaign. www.livinghistoryfarm.org...

The arab spring can be directly linked to a spike in food prices. I suspect the latest flap in Syria can as well. Higher food prices equal political unrest. They have to find some solution before the riots hit their streets.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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America and Russia - hard-hit by drought and down for the count, could even worse news be on the way?
Feel free to curse me for my memory lapse and failure to post a link, but I believe I saw an article indicating that the US had announced the purchase of $170 million of pork and other food stuffs to ensure food shelves and community feeding sites would have sufficient food.

Not surprisingly, as soon as this was announced, pork prices jumped way up.

I don't want to offer an opinion on it, as I am torn, but your fear seems to have been realized, at least in part.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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I'm down in GA here, and I wanna share what a local farmer told me, he said we would see increase in food prices, and that seed prices would soar up as well, so if you plan to plant anything (and I recommend you do) buy seeds and do it now, they can be frozen in airtight bags and kept for a long while.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by charles1952
 


Food prices are unlikely to jump very high in the U.S. Furthermore, most American's only spend less than 20% of their income annually on food according to the USDA. These prices hikes are more likely to affect countries in which people spend larger amounts of income on food already.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 11:06 PM
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This should help some, Canada is having a great year. We may be able to count on them if the drought continues next year, to pick up some of the slack with corn, along with wheat.


Canada is the world's seventh-largest, wheat-growing country, and the top exporter of spring wheat and durum, used in baking and pasta-making respectively. It's the biggest producer and shipper of canola, used to make oil for salad dressings and margarine. Canadian farmers will harvest a record-smashing 16 million tonnes of canola this year, and the biggest wheat crop in three years, according to a July poll by Reuters of traders and analysts.


www.reuters.com...
edit on 13-8-2012 by Iamschist because: misplaced comma



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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China Daily reports:

"China will release corn and rice from state reserves to help tame inflation and reduce imports as the worst US drought in half a century pushes corn prices to global records, creating fears of a world food crisis...The release may prompt Chinese importers to cancel shipments..."

edit on 8/13/2012 by silent thunder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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Sorry to bring up another "I thought I heard this," but I thought I heard that the US has not yet lifted the requirement that 40% of the corn crop be made into ethanol. I'm not vouching for this one, more looking for confirmation or rejection from you experts.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:18 AM
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Yeah there is a drought where there is crop insurance and government subsidies that pay people not to grow crops/food and guarantees prices and then some genius from the church of climatology said hey lets burn some of that for fuel as in ethanol. and at the same time cut domestic oil production by banning a pipleline that could have relieve some of the stress of that food "supply shortage".

I am not dismissing the drought as bad but had certain policies had more foresight we would not be "in the pickle" we are in now.

but most likely all part of the master plan and "never let a good crisis" go to waste.
edit on 14-8-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 06:13 AM
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While it may only account for a blip on the overall food radar, we've just experienced the worst king salmon return ever recorded in Alaska and, about midway through the run, the coho salmon return is looking even worse than the king return did. The irony is that we had a ridiculously massive red run, but due to the handfull of precious kings lingering in the inlet, the commercial fisheries operated under massive restrictions. Expect wild caught salmon prices in the Lower 48 to be soaring alongside the corn fed stock prices.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 07:59 AM
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Producers of any needed item will look for any excuse in the books to raise prices and boost the bottom line.

Riddle me this, dear and good folks of ATS . . . how many times have the prices of something or other been inflated due to external pressures, be it drought, war in East Boolieboolie, the change in the wind direction in the eastern half of the Arctic or some other thing . . . and after the issue is resloved, the prices do not come back down to the pre-incident level.

It just doesn't happen.

So, if the price of food increases due to this drought, you can bet your arse they won't ever return to the pre-drought levels.

Just look at the price of gasoline. While the price of oil has decreased substantially over the past few years, the price of gas . . . has not and there is always some sort of excuse why it hasn't . . .

Change the headline, but the result is the same. And the other somewhat harsh reality is, this never happens to the stuff we don't rely upon to survive . . . it's always the stuff you can't get away from using.

Go figure.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by charles1952
Sorry to bring up another "I thought I heard this," but I thought I heard that the US has not yet lifted the requirement that 40% of the corn crop be made into ethanol. I'm not vouching for this one, more looking for confirmation or rejection from you experts.



I think they are still debating it. Gas prices are soaring, too, and lack of corn for ethanol is probably making it worse.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 08:19 AM
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Originally posted by neo96
Yeah there is a drought where there is crop insurance and government subsidies that pay people not to grow crops/food and guarantees prices and then some genius from the church of climatology said hey lets burn some of that for fuel as in ethanol. and at the same time cut domestic oil production by banning a pipleline that could have relieve some of the stress of that food "supply shortage".

I am not dismissing the drought as bad but had certain policies had more foresight we would not be "in the pickle" we are in now.

but most likely all part of the master plan and "never let a good crisis" go to waste.
edit on 14-8-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



What I can't figure out is I live in Texas and I drive by so many corn fields that are always dead. Why are we growing corn here if we're always in a drought? (Maybe not every year but it's very frequent)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 08:26 AM
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Originally posted by silent thunder
China Daily reports:

"China will release corn and rice from state reserves to help tame inflation and reduce imports as the worst US drought in half a century pushes corn prices to global records, creating fears of a world food crisis...The release may prompt Chinese importers to cancel shipments..."

edit on 8/13/2012 by silent thunder because: (no reason given)


That is absolutely the wrong thing to do. China should keep their grains entirely to themselves.

Let the US fix the problems it causes for once.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by binkman
 


Beg pardon? It is true we are mighty and powerful, still, controlling the weather is not something we have got up to. Your comment seems a bit harsh.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 10:49 AM
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you know we can only blame greed for soaring food prices yes the crop yield in some areas are sorely depleted but its not all mother natures fault i live the south and every farm around me grows corn and soybeans but none of them spend a dime on irrigation they expect mother nature to bless their crops with rain when i lived in wisconsin and all the farmers there relied on their corn fields to feed their cows they all invested in irrigation of one form or another. also they want to sell corn to make gas instead of for food why because its guaranteed money. now the g20 want to meet and talk but what are they going to do about problem not a damn thing. what they need to do is stop using corn for fuel production starting immediately release money to help with irrigation projects inform farmers they need to invest in irrigation for their fields and help they out with tax breaks and or grants. where to find money make corporations pay their fair share of taxes and stop giving rebate checks to mega corps like ge



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by burdman30ott6
 


Yesh, guess i'm gonna have to lay off that fish for awhile. Anchovies are actually a cheap source of Omega 3's and you can make a good sauce with them.

So , I wonder how many people realize most of the corn we grow is actually for feeding lifestock? I suspect the highest rise in prices will be at the meat counter. I'm more of a rice and beans person so I think my family will do ok.
edit on 14-8-2012 by antonia because: opps



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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I agree the drought will cause an impact in food prices, but I also think oil prices play a big part in the shipping prices, which causes the food prices to increase as well. And, not just food prices, I've been paying a fuel surcharge for my trash service which is an extra $12 per bill.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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Originally posted by antonia
reply to post by burdman30ott6
 


Yesh, guess i'm gonna have to lay off that fish for awhile. Anchovies are actually a cheap source of Omega 3's and you can make a good sauce with them.

So , I wonder how many people realize most of the corn we grow is actually for feeding lifestock? I suspect the highest rise in prices will be at the meat counter. I'm more of a rice and beans person so I think my family will do ok.
edit on 14-8-2012 by antonia because: opps


Hello...

I'm in the rural South, a lot of cattle farmers here. What my neighbors in the beef industry are telling me, is to stock up on beef now, and in the next 6 months. That many cattle people are selling off their stock, at rock bottom prices, due to soaring feed costs. The beef market will be flooded with below par stock. So, prices will drop for a short time.

In the past 8 months alone, a 50lb bag of cracked corn I use in my goat feed, has risen from $6 a bag to $10 a bag. I'm still getting it at $8 a bag, but only through a co-operative where we pool out funds for bulk pricing.

It's going to get much worse over the winter when livestock folks depend more on grain for feeding.

Des



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