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Curiosity peaks my Curiosity

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posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 04:18 AM
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Hello,
I have been looking through all the pictures sent back by Curiosity and loving the new HD colour pics. It's amazing to think we are looking at another planet. Anyway, i thought i would send a couple of them over to my Geologist mate. He was kind enough to take a look at the photo's and give me his opinion on what he thinks.

Here is the link
www.nasa.gov...

"Finer grained metamorphic / igneous rocks. Possibly rounded by water, if rivers ever existed on mars."

Anyway, there it is, i know Mars is already believed to have had a watery past, but their is proof from someone i know. I'v got to believe that!

I can't wait to show him some more image's and see what he thinks. So i will update you guys when i can.
Thanks, and keep searching for the truth.
edit on 13-8-2012 by australianobserver because: Grammar




posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 04:27 AM
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I am waiting for your update, but "possibly rounded by water" isn't quite what some will call proof.

Fascinating possibility, though. What could have caused a planet to lose all it's water? Quickly or slowly? I'm with you, good luck truth seekers.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by charles1952
 


Yes definitely a poor choice of words on my behalf. Of course it doesn't confirm it beyond a doubt, but it's interesting non the less.

Thanks



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 04:58 AM
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edit on 13-8-2012 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)


thanks charles / below
edit on 13-8-2012 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 05:03 AM
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reply to post by ZIPMATT
 

You can try this one: www.abovetopsecret.com... and there are more if you use search for "curiosity pictures."

I did see one with what appeared to be a dead cat. When I checked the NASA explanation they only said "Well, you know, Curiosity killed ..... (I crack myself up sometimes.)



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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Originally posted by charles1952
I am waiting for your update, but "possibly rounded by water" isn't quite what some will call proof.

Fascinating possibility, though. What could have caused a planet to lose all it's water? Quickly or slowly? I'm with you, good luck truth seekers.


As the core of mars lost it's magnetic field solar winds stripped mars of it's water and a large portion of it's atmosphere.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by Ilyich
 

This is just one more area added to the dozens I know nothing about. I'm guessing that the Martian magnetic fields didn't hold the water in place, but protected it in some way from the Solar winds. I doubt if any matter, or wind could travel to Mars from the Sun, so I'm guessing there is some form of radiation that the magnetic field protected Mars from.

Taken from the other end, what does losing its magnetic core mean? How can a planet lose its core? How can a core (metallic, presumably) lose its magnetism?

As you can see, I have the knowledge of a first-grader. If anyone would like to help, I'd be grateful.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 07:02 PM
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This is a very nice 360 degree panorama shot in colour:

www.panoramas.dk...



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:17 AM
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reply to post by thoiter
 


Awesome pics. Great site!



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 04:24 AM
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reply to post by charles1952
 


Hey, i believe Mars does receive radiation and particles from the sun. Obviously not as much as Earth. But even the fact that it has a weaker magnetic field allows radiation from many sources to enter more freely. This is why i am so interested to see Curiosity's results in regards to the radiation that effects the surface of Mars. Something i believe would be very important for potential human habitation.



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