It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Could we birth life into Mars?

page: 3
4
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 10 2012 @ 11:54 PM
link   
Isn't one of the Mars Terraforming strategies to explode a few nuclear weapons on the surface to stir up Mars Dust in order to create a faux atmosphere & get a greenhouse gas effect going to shield it from the sun?

Thought i read that somewhere - that wouldn't cost much...we have plenty of nukes lying around down here we could send up there....




posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 01:00 AM
link   
reply to post by BABYBULL24
 



Hello my fellow Troll,

We don't need a nuclear anything to explode on Mars. If you are willing to do the calculations and measurements, you will find that Mars' dust storms create a lot of energy. Kilotons at least. Do your due diligence. This is what we do in my field.



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 01:28 AM
link   
reply to post by Diablos
 


If you have been an astute member or ATS, you would have made the conspiracy connections already. The USA is a vast and wealthy country. But there are those that are siffoning off funds from our hard earned work, and there are those that don't want their "comfortable" lives not to be interfered with. Rich or the Well Fare Poor!
If we all the wasted money from the recent wars could have gone to tuition for University to teach students, to fund space programs such as JPL/NASA, then we would have more spectacular results.

Just my thoughts..

Kratos40

edit on 11-8-2012 by Kratos40 because: syntax



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 05:57 AM
link   

Originally posted by DestroyDestroyDestroy
Considering Mars has a climate similar to that of Earth which could possibly sustain life, would it be possible for us to turn it into a fertile planet?

Could we perhaps create a biodome on Mars which could sustain vegetation from Earth and slowly introduce life to the barren planet? Perhaps we could genetically modify some plants and organisms to survive harsher climates such as those on Mars.

If possible, this may be one solution to overpopulation of people on Earth; we could turn mars into another Earth for people to populate.


First we do not have an overpopulation problem on Earth. Second yeah I think we could fix Mars up, but I am sure it would take awhile. I personally think people are too stupid to want to do space related stuff... So it is going to be awhile..



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 06:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by DestroyDestroyDestroy
would it be possible for us to turn it into a fertile planet?



Yes, given enough time, and technology we dont have (such as being able to push comets around so they impact Mars to give it more water).

One of our ATS members, Jim Oberg, has written a book on the topic.

Time is an issue if you're impatient. Quoting a NASA study,to generate an atmosphere one might use blue-green algae. But because of the reduced sunlight...
"To produce an amount equivalent to the minimum necessary for human breathing would take 140,000 years."



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 07:26 AM
link   
Well, terraforming Mars is impossible I say. We cannot do anything to its magnetic field, which is too weak. Even though we would manage to make its atmosphere denser, gases would just escape to outer space. There is some frozen water and CO2 on its poles, but solar wind has blown most away. Mars was just like Earth millions of years ago, until its magnetic field went weak. Then it started to lose important gases like water and CO2 into space.

We currently don't have technology to make magnetic field stronger. Artificial magnetic fields require vast amounts of electricity.

There are better alternatives, but they are much farther. Saturn's moon Titan is most earth-like body in our solar system. It has dense atmosphere, water, nitrogen, volcanic activity, in fact, its very similar to young earth. It may even have microbial life, as there are complex organic chemicals. Its surface is full of methane lakes and methane circulation is like water circulation here on earth. Life could bloom in subsurface lakes.

We could call it Earth-2
, or New Earth.
edit on 11-8-2012 by Thebel because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 07:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by DestroyDestroyDestroy
Considering Mars has a climate similar to that of Earth which could possibly sustain life, would it be possible for us to turn it into a fertile planet?

Could we perhaps create a biodome on Mars which could sustain vegetation from Earth and slowly introduce life to the barren planet? Perhaps we could genetically modify some plants and organisms to survive harsher climates such as those on Mars.

If possible, this may be one solution to overpopulation of people on Earth; we could turn mars into another Earth for people to populate. [/quote
Mar's 'climate'? the atmosphere is about one hundredths of earth's, Mars does not have a magnetosphere, the solar wind will kill any living thing inside an hour, there is no 'free' water, dust storms cover the whole planet sometimes, and last for days, The only way to live on Mars is underground.



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 08:29 AM
link   
ok I am thinking completely out of the box but based on todays tech. where are the remains of Einstein Oppenheimer and Nikola Tesla? I say clone there remains and I bet those kids could figure it out .................



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 09:59 AM
link   

Originally posted by AgentX09
Terraforming.Change the surface to change the atmosphere.Would take a long time and be expensive I guess.


Terraforming will never happen on Mars.
Something near impossible would need to happen first, give Mars a stronger magnetic field.
The core of Mars does not sustain a magnetic field the size and intensity of Earth's, therefore too much radiation hits Mars.



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 11:46 AM
link   
would be so cool to begin to populate another planet it would be a huge technological achievement

I think it would be a good idea in the future, not just for population problems, but something could happen to earth, could be hit by a meteor, nuclear war, alien invasion or whatever say earth gets screwed up somehow, it would be an idea to have a backup incase our whole species is threatened somehow, at least we know our species would be still living on another planet, as the saying goes not have all your eggs in one basket lol



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 05:26 PM
link   
reply to post by Diablos
 


Our time as a superpower is coming to an end; it is foolish to assume that just because we had a 60 year stretch of glory we will somehow remain a superpower forever; all empires collapse eventually.

Regarding my approach to long term problems, I think it best to take steps now to avoid a disaster scenario later. Why not take a preventative approach? Using diet as an example of short term VS long term planning, Is it better to eat garbage your entire life and feel good at the expense of vastly reducing your potential life span with mounting health problems, or to eat a healthy diet which will yield you a long life with reduced risk of illness? While it may not "taste good" to put the Twinkies aside and grab a carrot, the latter choice is more beneficial to your overall well being. In terms of our mounting problems, we need to address them at some point, so why not address them before we contract diabetes?

Please tone down the hypernationalist chauvinism. Being proud of your country's accomplishments is one thing, being blind to its faults is another. We're nearing the end of our stretch as the world's largest economic power. Our currency is losing value and China will overtake us as the leading superpower sometime in the near future. The America we live in today has lost most of its greatness, I don't think many people would doubt that. I'm more interested in pushing our species forward than cheering for laundry; people are people regardless of the flag they fly.



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 06:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by Kratos40
reply to post by BABYBULL24
 



Hello my fellow Troll,

We don't need a nuclear anything to explode on Mars. If you are willing to do the calculations and measurements, you will find that Mars' dust storms create a lot of energy. Kilotons at least. Do your due diligence. This is what we do in my field.


Troll?
Its not my idea...lol

Michio Kaku is he a troll?




posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 09:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by eriktheawful

Originally posted by MegaSpace

Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
reply to post by DestroyDestroyDestroy
 


change title to re-birth.

I'm pretty sure Mars used to have life.

It's like the old Earth...


i like re birthing
What if our earth was once a mars type planet & we originate from mars, then once up a time we terraformed earth & here we are?. Im just saying it can be possible.


There has been a theory that when the solar system was young, but the planets had cooled enough to start having liquid water on them, that life might have gotten started on Mars first (if it happened at all), and that one of the large impacts that it has had by an asteroid may have ejected material from Mars which ended up on Earth, actually "seeding" Earth with life.

Kind of a wild theory, but not too far fetched. If even fossilized microbes could be found on Mars, it might even give that theory more thought. We do know that material from Mars does end up on Earth:

Martian Meteorite


The wildest theory I’ve heard stems from mythology I heard many, many years ago. It went on to say what if mars was at a different orbit that it is now? Maybe the myth about venus having fallen in love with mars might be actually be a story describing what our ancestors were seeing, such as an event as orbit shifting via penetrating “pushing one out” another one out of the way in our distant past?

Just saying mythology has always fascinated me.

Thanks for the link on prior post on core



posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 10:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by MegaSpace

Originally posted by eriktheawful

Originally posted by MegaSpace

Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
reply to post by DestroyDestroyDestroy
 


change title to re-birth.

I'm pretty sure Mars used to have life.

It's like the old Earth...


i like re birthing
What if our earth was once a mars type planet & we originate from mars, then once up a time we terraformed earth & here we are?. Im just saying it can be possible.


There has been a theory that when the solar system was young, but the planets had cooled enough to start having liquid water on them, that life might have gotten started on Mars first (if it happened at all), and that one of the large impacts that it has had by an asteroid may have ejected material from Mars which ended up on Earth, actually "seeding" Earth with life.

Kind of a wild theory, but not too far fetched. If even fossilized microbes could be found on Mars, it might even give that theory more thought. We do know that material from Mars does end up on Earth:

Martian Meteorite


The wildest theory I’ve heard stems from mythology I heard many, many years ago. It went on to say what if mars was at a different orbit that it is now? Maybe the myth about venus having fallen in love with mars might be actually be a story describing what our ancestors were seeing, such as an event as orbit shifting via penetrating “pushing one out” another one out of the way in our distant past?

Just saying mythology has always fascinated me.

Thanks for the link on prior post on core


Actually, your idea sort of has merit, but not Mars changing orbits. With Venus and Mars in the orbits they are in, this is what an observer will see:

Venus can appear to rise from the horizon, then sink towards it. If Mars is in the sky, it can look at times like Venus is getting closer to it, then moving away from it.
Because Mars orbits outside of our orbit, it can appear to reverse it's path in the sky (this is because the Earth orbits the sun closer and faster, so it "laps" Mars so to speak).

So one could say that people in ancient times observed this and to them, Mars and Venus seemed attracted towards each other at times, and at other's moved away from each other.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 06:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by MegaSpace

Originally posted by InsideYourMind
First (if this would even work
) you'd have to burrow a hole to the core of the planet and detonate something big enough to get the core going again. Mars is as dead as dead can be, no active core, no magnetosphere = no life.



Is this true, that mars has no active core or a dead core? This part is kinda news to me, im still learning




Yes. The core of earth for example, is what creates the magnetosphere (think of it as a force field). The magnetosphere diverts solar wind and cosmic radiation to the poles, which is why we have the northern lights here on earth.



posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 06:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by AvrilDupre
I cannot understand how Earth is over-populated. Our planet is 29% land, and we only use less than 1% of the total area. If you deduct the areas for wildlife, there is still a very comfortable percentage to thrive on.
Think about food instead of domiciles. One theory says that our dependence on fossil fuels allows us to support a much larger population on a temporary basis than is sustainable. Remember how farming was done before fossil fuel? Ox-drawn farm implements worked, but were nowhere as efficient as the giant fossil-fuel based farm machines used today. So if there's no more gas to power those huge farm machines, how will farming be done? How will the food be distributed without gasoline?

And where did you get your 1% figure? We are using much of the usable land. Antarctica, Greenland, Siberia, Northern Canada etc are immensely vast wastelands that can't support any significant population. Cutting down more rainforest to build more farms is something we are trying to avoid, because we need rainforests.


If we consider mars for colonization, why wouldn't we possibly use the "lifeless" deserts throughout the world, I mean there is a critical component to colonization that Mars does not have, a breathable atmosphere.
Lots of people already live in desert areas (Las Vegas for example). I'm sure we will use more and more desert. Where we can get water to it, we are using it for farming.

One main reason to colonize another planet is so we don't end up extinct like the dinosaurs when an extinction level event occurs. It's certainly not because Mars will be more habitable than the desert.




top topics



 
4
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join