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Australian Beaches Eroded in Days by 4m Swells

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posted on Aug, 8 2012 @ 01:43 PM
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I found this interesting. I'm having to post it really quickly, because I have a meeting in a few minutes, but check out the link!

My thoughts on the situation: Changes in tidal trends due to rapid changes in localized weather patterns. Localized weather patterns tend to have a typical trending effect. Example: Extremely dry summer for Colorado = Very wet summer for Texas and the midwest. These trends don't only occur over land, but over the oceans as well. The problem is that weather trends over the ocean are not readily felt by the common person and since 70% of the earth is covered in water, not all seemingly small changes are reported to the masses.

The question now is, what is occuring in the South Pacific that could cause these 4m surfs on the Gold Coast? For whatever reason, it seems the tidal current has shifted just enough for the current to impact the shoreline at a much high degree/angle than it typically would have in past years. Shifts like this are typical of major tempurature changes in the deep.

www.dailytelegraph.com.au...




posted on Aug, 8 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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No worries pal...just read this post to ease your mind


Happy Thoughts


edit on 8-8-2012 by HawkeyeNation because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by Xterrain
 


many factors come into play with regards to beach erosion, the number one factor that hardly gets mentioned is the dredging of channels and the creation of rock walls which cause more problems further along the beach.

beach's are made of sand and as such tend to constantly be on the move up and around the coast, sand islands will move in a clock wise fashion in the southern hemisphere.



posted on Aug, 8 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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reply to post by munkey66
 


The direction of the sand migration depends on which coast you are on. If you live on the east coast of Australia, the sand will natural migrate from the south to the north, which is actually an anti-clockwise direction.

I do agree that the construction of rock walls has contributed to stopping or slowing down the natural migration of sand, and as such, beaches are no longer receiving deposits of sand as they did prior to the construction of the break walls.

Another reason for such erosion is due to the fact that buildings/carparks/parks are built where the dunes once were. These dunes once had vegetation which assisted to stabilise the dune. Remove the vegetation and there is nothing to help keep the sand where it is.



posted on Aug, 8 2012 @ 06:37 PM
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reply to post by Xterrain
 


The question now is, what is occuring in the South Pacific that could cause these 4m surfs on the Gold Coast?

Not so much the South Pacific. The Southern Ocean. Severe winter storms marching past Australia and New Zealand. There was a shallow low pressure area east of Oz but it moved off without developing.


Pretty flat right now.
www.coastalwatch.com...



posted on Aug, 8 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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LOL on the "Happy Thoughts." I'm no doomsday nay sayer, but I am a realist and a realist with an open mind at that. I see what's occurring globally and attempt (



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