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Crazy Message Left On Broken Wing By Alaska Airlines’ Maintenance Crew

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posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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YIKES! If I had seen that it would have taken a lot of gentle coaxing and explaining (and possibly a cattle prod) to get me on that plane. It's probably not a huge deal, I'm sure the aircraft is safe and all considering the maintenance crew was (obviously) aware of the missing piece but damn son.


It may look like a joke played on passengers, but it's not: an Alaska Airlines' maintenance crew servicing a Boeing 737 cut out part of its wing and then wrote "We Know About This" next to it. Then, they sent the jetliner on a flight. Imagine being a passenger on that plane and noticing the missing part and the message. Obviously, the plane was apt for flight: the pilots always inspect their aircraft before taking off. But think about being on that window seat. Personally, I would just wonder what other parts in the plane were marked "we know about this." And then freak out.


So from the article it can be gleaned this is rather standard and that it is done to save time on paper work... Comforting.


Alaska Airlines has apologized profusely on Twitter. They admit the message was "inappropriate" and claim that they are "following up" with employees and passengers to see what happened. Clearly, there's not many secrets about how this happened. It seems that this is a normal practice. The only difference is that this time some just caught it on camera.


Again I'm sure it's safe, but come on guys, don't do that to us passengers!

When I was just a little kitten and had yet to discover makeup, I was in Costa Rica with the family and we were about to get on a small plane. Was a little disconcerting seeing the crew wrapping what appeared to be duct tape on the wing (I can't remember what or why though it was explained to us). My family and I were the only ones that didn't basically have a crap attack in the lobby.

Link

ETA I'm still laughing about the wording. 'We know about this, screw you guys LOL'.
edit on 6-8-2012 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 09:12 PM
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If that plane crash, we can always blame it to the Muslim terrorist.

The maintenance crew sure have ways to show their innocence. Now, where is the guy who gave the green light ?



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Hey, that probably saved a whole lot of stupid questions for the pilot and stewardesses.


Passenger: "Hey, did you know...., oh, never mind, it says right there."



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Domo1
 


Hey, that probably saved a whole lot of stupid questions for the pilot and stewardesses.


Passenger: "Hey, did you know...., oh, never mind, it says right there."


I guess so. I really can't stop cracking up about the whole thing. 'We know about this'. Well good you sumbitch, fix it!



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 09:42 PM
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Why would they cut off such a small piece like that, anyone know?



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by lokdog
 


My best guess (don't forget I'm totally a rocket scientist) is that there was some sort of slight damage and at high speed the damage could have potentially gotten worse. It certainly looks like an intentional cut. Airplane nerds encouraged to contribute.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:08 PM
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As pilot I can understand this. They didn't have time or facility to repair the part so they removed the damage. The flight crew doing the preflight sees the bite taken out of the flap but does not have to find a mechanic to find out what was trying to eat the plane.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:23 PM
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My guess, it could have had a bit of corrosion or crack, they cut it away to stop the spreading.
With a smaller crack or imperfections, they can also do a thing called stop drill, or something like that, where they drill a hole to stop the crack from spreading.
Though the writing is inappropriate.

Love and harmony
Whateva



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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Probably cut off a chunk for corrosion analysis or some such, since it looks like a fairly clean cut. Cutting off the damaged section would also likely stop the propagation of tearing or embrittlement in something made of aluminum. I'm not an air-frame specialist, but that's my best guess.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:31 PM
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that's a good repair....compared to back in 1968 we could stick our little finger in cracks on convairs at the wing and tail root
edit on 6-8-2012 by GBP/JPY because: Yahushua is our new King !!



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by Domo1


YIKES! If I had seen that it would have taken a lot of gentle coaxing and explaining (and possibly a cattle prod) to get me on that plane. It's probably not a huge deal, I'm sure the aircraft is safe and all considering the maintenance crew was (obviously) aware of the missing piece but damn son.


It may look like a joke played on passengers, but it's not: an Alaska Airlines' maintenance crew servicing a Boeing 737 cut out part of its wing and then wrote "We Know About This" next to it. Then, they sent the jetliner on a flight. Imagine being a passenger on that plane and noticing the missing part and the message. Obviously, the plane was apt for flight: the pilots always inspect their aircraft before taking off. But think about being on that window seat. Personally, I would just wonder what other parts in the plane were marked "we know about this." And then freak out.


So from the article it can be gleaned this is rather standard and that it is done to save time on paper work... Comforting.


Alaska Airlines has apologized profusely on Twitter. They admit the message was "inappropriate" and claim that they are "following up" with employees and passengers to see what happened. Clearly, there's not many secrets about how this happened. It seems that this is a normal practice. The only difference is that this time some just caught it on camera.


Again I'm sure it's safe, but come on guys, don't do that to us passengers!

When I was just a little kitten and had yet to discover makeup, I was in Costa Rica with the family and we were about to get on a small plane. Was a little disconcerting seeing the crew wrapping what appeared to be duct tape on the wing (I can't remember what or why though it was explained to us). My family and I were the only ones that didn't basically have a crap attack in the lobby.

Link

ETA I'm still laughing about the wording. 'We know about this, screw you guys LOL'.
edit on 6-8-2012 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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And... A meme was born.

We know about this


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Wow...Alaskan Airlines needs to change their name to Ghetto Air...Its funny but scary, I'll take a different flight thank you very much.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by lokdog
 


As an Aircraft Mechanic in the Air Force, I can tell you that this is a standard temp repair until parts are available. The tip on the aileron was probably damaged and assessed by an A&P Mechanic, who then made the cut and blended the surface to make it flyable.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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Its a chip off the flaps, mechanic cut it off to mend, suddenly phone comes in,

- stop repair, plane need to fly
+ but we havent finish mending it
- shut up, this is order,
+ uhh..if anything goes wrong its all on you
- nope, I know nothing about this, anyway bring the plane out
+ ok,.. - proceed to write on the flap - "We kn...." (if its go wrong and the records destroyed, FAA will know that I KNEW ABOUT IT)

Passenger saw, snap pic.
Coming soon - "We Knew This" on missing plane tire.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by strafgod
 


I have been thinking up some 'We know about this' images.



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:52 PM
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Reply to post by Domo1
 


Haha oh yeah I got a few ideas, unfortunately im not on a computer, will definitely be looking foreward to what you and other members create.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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I agree with others that it was most likely cut to remove a damaged corner. While in the Air Force, I saw Duct Tape, or 300 mile an hour tape as they called it to cover panel holes caused my assualt vehicles turning to soon while leaving the MH-53J Pave Low III. And the Aircraft Battle Damage Repair (ABDR) Teams trained repairing holes in Static Aircraft by using tin soup or Aluminum Soda Cans.

I had a pilot tell me once that in the Military Service, if a backup or redundant (?) system is down/malfunctioning, they often abort the mission for safety reasons. However, as long as the compass works and they can see out the window in a civilian craft, they're flying because money is involved.

The point is that unless there's a real flight safety problem any problems that can wait will be held untill their next regular maintenance stop.

From the point of this write up thought, I believe the ground crew did it so the passenger 'would' see it. While pilots do walk arounds, they aren't as likely to inspect the top of the wing. I think if the message had been for them, the note would have been written on the bottom of the wing. And speaking from experience, some maintenance folk have a sick twisted since of humor.

But I will always remember the first time I saw the wing of the 737 bouncing up and down as we flew... Thank God the guy sitting next to me didn't screw with me and explained it rather than tormented me.

And just remember this the next time you're on a flight. It's the jets or props that are flying. The box you're riding in is just being pulled along and only being held on my a few mounting bolts. And don't even ask about riding under the rotor of a helecopter. The bolts are fewer and smaller. :-)



posted on Aug, 6 2012 @ 11:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by Domo1


YIKES! If I had seen that it would have taken a lot of gentle coaxing and explaining (and possibly a cattle prod) to get me on that plane. It's probably not a huge deal, I'm sure the aircraft is safe and all considering the maintenance crew was (obviously) aware of the missing piece but damn son.


It may look like a joke played on passengers, but it's not: an Alaska Airlines' maintenance crew servicing a Boeing 737 cut out part of its wing and then wrote "We Know About This" next to it. Then, they sent the jetliner on a flight. Imagine being a passenger on that plane and noticing the missing part and the message. Obviously, the plane was apt for flight: the pilots always inspect their aircraft before taking off. But think about being on that window seat. Personally, I would just wonder what other parts in the plane were marked "we know about this." And then freak out.


So from the article it can be gleaned this is rather standard and that it is done to save time on paper work... Comforting.


Alaska Airlines has apologized profusely on Twitter. They admit the message was "inappropriate" and claim that they are "following up" with employees and passengers to see what happened. Clearly, there's not many secrets about how this happened. It seems that this is a normal practice. The only difference is that this time some just caught it on camera.


Again I'm sure it's safe, but come on guys, don't do that to us passengers!

When I was just a little kitten and had yet to discover makeup, I was in Costa Rica with the family and we were about to get on a small plane. Was a little disconcerting seeing the crew wrapping what appeared to be duct tape on the wing (I can't remember what or why though it was explained to us). My family and I were the only ones that didn't basically have a crap attack in the lobby.

Link

ETA I'm still laughing about the wording. 'We know about this, screw you guys LOL'.
edit on 6-8-2012 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)


Perhaps what they meant was they knew about it and were too afraid to report it for fear of losing their jobs or the air line taking maintenance work to countries where they don't have to worry about workers whistle blowing or bringing faults like this to the attention of management.



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Lol.. I don't know what I'd do if I saw that outside my window. Whoever wrote it though clearly as an interesting sense of humor, I can relate as it's something I'd probably do.




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