Janet/Groom scanner audio 7/26/2012

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posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 12:40 PM
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reply to post by gariac
 


gariac, it's hard for me to question anything that comes from your posts, but if a B-2 was getting gas at 5000 AGL then there was something wrong with the B-2. usually anything below 10,000 feet AGL is considered special ops air refuelings and I would assume that they reserve that for the actual theater. When your that low and slow, it's the most dangerous time to perform AAR. The boom is very "heavy" at low altitudes and requires alot of strength to hold it in the right position. The only time I see this other than in war is during flyby's and thats still when the two aircraft are somewhat separated.

In fact, you have to have a special training to be certified in low altitude air refueling




posted on Aug, 11 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by boomer135
 


It was very low. The track used isn't an official track (FAA registered), so that might explain the altitude. They used a white KC-10.

It was so low I could see it without my contacts. I didn't get a shot since I had to put my contacts in first then find the camera.



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 06:48 AM
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reply to post by gariac
 


Wait...all white? or white with a blue front? or white bottom with grey top? They all have different meanings. If it was all white, it may be the dutch. White with the blue front was used back in the day for stationing aircraft in foriegn countries that didn't like the military grey planes on their runways, etc. Just curioius...



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by boomer135
 


To my recollection, it was all white. But when you look from underneath and then from the back, you can't get much detail about the front.



posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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That's cool. You don't see them that off. Especially the shamu colored ones



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 01:58 AM
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reply to post by boomer135
 


No offense to jumbo jets full of fuel, but the B-2 was the main focus. ;-)

Getting back to callsigns, during Red Flag, the tankers use Gulf and Baja. [I never understood the significance of Baja for a tanker.] In the past, they used Arco as well. But a tanker just flying around could be using a Reach callsign if it was carrying cargo.

Here are the Red Flag photos:
www.lazygranch.com...



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by gariac
 


We used the reach call sign a lot for the air bridge that was set up between Maine and the UK right after 9-11 to ferry the fighters across the pond. Also use it for coronets over the pacific and like you said, when we were hauling cargo globally.



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 02:00 PM
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Great information guys, it's really interesting learning about this stuff and knowing what to listen for in the future when I'm scanning around the HF military aviation bands. I have yet to hear anything in terms of military aircraft transmissions while I have been pointed towards Nevada though. You guys wouldn't happen to have any idea how much RF power these aircraft might be using? At night I have made contacts with several amateur radio operators in Nevada and the stations and myself were running about 1 Kilowatt of power resulting in signal strengths of about S9+20, surely any aircraft flying at altitude running even the smallest amount of power would be heard... Perhaps it's just a case of catching the audio at the right time.

I would imagine I should be able to hear these transmissions from Nellis as the propagation has been quite effective at night lately. During the day while I am at work I am scanning numerous frequencies in that area while constantly recording. I do an audio file scan afterwards that finds any vocal signatures using an application called Stienberg Wavelab.
edit on 17-8-2012 by Jocko Flocko because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by Jocko Flocko
 


To be honest, when I left the air force in 2006 we rarely used hf. We had satcoms by then and we just made a phone call instead of using hf. So I'm not sure if you would hear must hf at all with military aircraft.



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by Jocko Flocko
 


I don't think there is much if any HF being used at Groom. The testing as far as I know is local. It isn't like the old days where they flew actual missions out of Groom Lake, i.e. the A-12 days. Further, Nellis (99th comm) has what are referred to as repeaters, though I suspect they are microwave linked "satellite" (as in remote) radio sites. Even though the range is big, they can use multiple sites so that aircraft are never out of range of some remote radio facility. Nellis needs to maintain remote sites for ACMI (short range L band cooms) so it isn't all that much more work to maintain UHF remote sites too.

HF is usually only on cargo planes (toss in the AC-130), choppers (with dubious effectiveness) and bombers. I don't know if fighter aircraft or UAVs use HF, but I doubt it. Basically you have a "want" to hear Groom, but there is no "need." Consider the antenna switching Groom Tower does just to make it harder to hear the tower signals on the east side of the range. [The planes on the ground sound better.] The base owns a great mountain top (Baldie), but it can hit 5 states if they don't use some caution.

You might have some luck with PC-HFDL
wiki.radioreference.com...
It looks like it is free now, but if Charles still charges, I can vouch for the program. I haven't run it though in maybe two years. It even worked under "wine". I used to have an ACARS, HFDL dedicated computer, but had to repurpose it when some other gear croaked. I never caught any Janet doing ACARS. You can hear on my recordings that they just handle fuel requests by voice. Tonopah is a big ACARS location. Planes hit Tonopah ACARS before landing in the SF Bay Area.

There was someone in Rachel that had a scanner which you could monitor remotely for $5 a month or something like that. The service didn't last long. That leaves the liveatc website.

If you want to hear Groom Lake live, book a flight! The next best thing is just to listen to a recording.

Incidentally, Base Camp has a nice HF antenna.

I have no idea how they use it. MARS perhaps?





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