Mississippi River Closed Due to Drought

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posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:00 PM
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Two barges ran aground in different parts of the Mississippi River system.
The result of that was the closing of traffic in those parts of the river.

This river is a vital part of the economy of the US.


(Reuters) - The Mississippi River was closed to traffic at two locations on Thursday as barge tows ran aground near Greenville, Arkansas, and La Crosse, Wisconsin, due to low water amid the worst U.S. drought in 56 years, private and government sources said. It was unclear when the key shipping waterway might be reopened to commercial traffic, they said. Low water has restricted barge drafts to a lighter-than-normal nine feet and limited barge tows to fewer barges on numerous sections of the Mississippi River. But even as vessels have lightened their cargo loads, numerous boats have run aground in recent weeks, forcing temporary river closures and snarling north- and southbound freight traffic. The river is a major shipping lane for grains, oilseeds, fertilizer, salt, coal, and other cargo.


www.cnbc.com...

The drought in the US is having more of an impact then just crops.

This is becoming really bad.




posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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I truly hope that this is just a cycle in climate and nothing long term.

Take a look at this graph...




water.weather.gov...

This reading was taken around Memphis,TN.

Included is the prediction of the river levels.

Not looking good at all
edit on 2-8-2012 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:20 PM
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I really hope this is just a cycle. Here in Missouri it is so dry. There is hardly a corn crop this year but the soybeans seem to be doing better. I haven't seen the river lately but I imagine its low as well. In the forecast we have small chances of rain but I fear that it was too late in the season to make a difference on this years crops. Be on the lookout for higher meat and corn prices.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:22 PM
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About a year ago I remember a thread that predicted the Mississippi River will go through drastic change by 2013.

Climate change is real, the reasons may still be uncertain, but it is most definitely not a hoax.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:35 PM
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So,how is Russia doing with they're crops?
And elsewhere in the world?


SINGAPORE/MILAN, Aug 1 (Reuters) - Corn and soybean futures eased on Wednesday, as markets took a breather from a scorching rally that saw corn post its biggest two-month gain since the U.S. drought of 1988. Wheat futures lost traction after a Russian government source said the key global supplier is set to maintain its exportable wheat surplus. Even as prices drew back, alarm grew over the worst U.S. Midwest drought in more than half a century as a top agriculture company warned that the government must act fast to cut the amount of corn going to ethanol to prevent a sharp spike in food prices. Chicago Board of Trade new-crop December corn fell 1.15 percent to $7.96 a bushel by 1017 GMT, while actively traded November soy eased 0.37 percent to $16.35 a bushel. Corn and wheat prices have risen about 50 percent in the last six weeks and soybeans by around 20 percent as U.S. crops got scorched by heat and drought. Analysts said bullish sentiment was still firmly intact. "The concern about crop yields is continuing to support the market and there are reports that suggest we might see much lower yields," said Abah Ofon, an analyst at Standard Chartered Bank in Singapore.


in.reuters.com...

Wait a minute,prices FELL????



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:40 PM
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So,I was checking this out in the mean time.

Back to the river............


VICKSBURG, Miss. (USA TODAY) — The Mississippi River here dropped to a daily record low Wednesday, dipping below a foot at the gauge. Though the level on the Vicksburg gauge bobbed to as low as 0.95 feet various times throughout the day, the channel, though narrowing, remains at least 9 feet or deeper throughout the system. The official level likely will be recorded at 1.1 feet. "It looks like a coastline out there," said Reynold Minsky, president of the 5th Louisiana Levee District board. "There are more beaches on the river than there are in Florida." The previous record low on the Vicksburg gauge for Aug. 1 was 2.8 feet set in 1988, said Drew Smith, a hydraulic engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Vicksburg District. The all-time record low was minus 1.6 feet set on July 13, 1988.


www.democratandchronicle.com...

So possibly a cycle.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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I think that should have read Greenville, Mississippi. I'm pretty sure there is no Greenville, Arkansas. Too bad the only time my home town makes the news is when something is wrong. Seldom does good news come from that little miserable town.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:49 PM
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I live not to far from the Ohio River,which feeds into the Mississippi, and I hope it doesn't come to the point were I can walk across it verses driving across a bridge.
Don't think it will come to that,though.
edit on 2-8-2012 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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I keep seeing on CNN an ad for one of their article

Mississippi BURNING

Closing the river mean its true .. is it almost dry out ?
we need pictures
edit on 8/2/2012 by Ben81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by Ben81
I keep seeing on CNN an ad for one of their article

Mississippi BURNING

Closing the river mean its true .. is it almost dry out ?
we need pictures
edit on 8/2/2012 by Ben81 because: (no reason given)


Don't think it's that low,that ad is totally a different subject



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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Originally posted by wondermost
I think that should have read Greenville, Mississippi. I'm pretty sure there is no Greenville, Arkansas. Too bad the only time my home town makes the news is when something is wrong. Seldom does good news come from that little miserable town.


I know,that sucks.

Henryville,IN,just 20 miles north of me got hit hard by a tornado 5 months ago.

Destroyed the high school,but they managed to rebuild it in time for the start of the new school year.
edit on 2-8-2012 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:09 PM
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Oh man. This is just too much, almost makes me feel like shutting off from the grid NOW. This blows my mind.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Liv07
 


It very well maybe a cycle, one that may last for years....and yes food prices are going to skyrocket (last few years crop yields have been bad, this year is going to be horrific)



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


From a different article this spring when it was closed due to flood




About 60 percent of U.S. grain exports go out through the Mississippi.

Eight Louisiana refineries dependent on the river to bring crude oil from the Gulf of Mexico and to move refined products into the Gulf, are not affected by Monday's closure.

www.reuters.com...



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:15 PM
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Originally posted by stanguilles7
reply to post by kdog1982
 


From a different article this spring when it was closed due to flood




About 60 percent of U.S. grain exports go out through the Mississippi.

Eight Louisiana refineries dependent on the river to bring crude oil from the Gulf of Mexico and to move refined products into the Gulf, are not affected by Monday's closure.

www.reuters.com...


Yeah,I remember when they had to blow up a section of the Miss. dikes to release the stress from flooding,therefore flooding out farmlands and homesteads.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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Yep it's not good. I was expecting this for a while now. I recommend that everyone learn to fast and stock up on brown rice and quinoa and kelp pills. And St Johns Wort extract.

edit on 2-8-2012 by BlueMule because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:22 PM
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Originally posted by BlueMule
Yep it's not good. I was expecting this for a while now. I recommend that everyone learn to fast and stock up on brown rice and quinoa and kelp pills. And St Johns Wort extract.

edit on 2-8-2012 by BlueMule because: (no reason given)


You know,I was wondering about those " maps" of the future US flooded .

Seems to me to be opposite of that ,for now.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


I was mainly posting it for the info about how many products rely on the Mississippi to get to port.



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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The impacts of both natural and manmade global warming climactic changes have finally made it a subject in great need of discussion.

I am wondering how the melting glaciers coupled with drought will affect the tectonic plates. This to me is a very serious consideration.


It is difficult to foresee exactly how global warming will effect Earth's many complex systems, but most of those systems are integrated. For example, glacial ice puts a large amount of pressure on the land. Release of this pressure may in fact lead to increased plate movement as the buoyant continents quickly rebound, causing increased earthquake conditions.


Read more: greenanswers.com...



posted on Aug, 2 2012 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


I do not agree, when the ground gets so dry it can no longer hold the green life it once did and as the ground cracks and dries even a moderate rainfall can then cause flooding.

No doubt about it this is very serious.





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