Keep Your Eyes on the Ebola Outbreak

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posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 03:15 PM
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Another ATS member passed this on in a thread about diseases, so I will also pass it on. It is a good source for keeping track.

Ebola is blood born, like AIDS, so is not at the present time a risk if you don't exchange bodily fluids. No need to panic.

outbreaks.globalincidentmap.com...




posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by Longshots
 


Thanks for the information. On this one, I don't think its going to go very far, although I claim no absolutes.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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I'm not too far from Uganda and this type of thing happens at least once or twice a year. Nothing so far, you can imagine the amount of people crossing into other countries but for you folks in other parts of the world you have nothing to fear.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 03:42 PM
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Originally posted by Corruption Exposed

Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by MentorsRiddle
 


Rabies is still the top contender. It has a 99.9% fatality rate, only one person has ever survived intact.

55,000 people each year die from rabies.

Funny how a virus is only scary when it is new.

Only 1200 have died from ebola since the 70s.
edit on 1-8-2012 by nixie_nox because: (no reason given)


Stop spreading disinformation.


Rabies is a fatal infection of the central nervous system acquired through the bite of a rabid animal. The 100% fatality rate of this infection when left untreated, and its near global distribution (estimated 60,000 human fatalities per year worldwide), makes rabies one of the most significant and dread diseases. While endemic dog rabies is of major concern worldwide, rabies control programs have reduced the number of dog rabies cases in the United States to less than 200/year. However, a large reservoir of rabies exists in wildlife animals (racoon, skunk, bat and fox).

In the United States, 35 cases of human rabies have been reported between 1990 and 2003. Infection is prevented in humans by injection of rabies immunoglobulin followed by a series of injections with rabies vaccine. However, to achieve this success, it is estimated that the cost associated with rabies control exceeds hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

www.wadsworth.org...


It's only fatal when left untreated, but is easily treated in humans even in advanced stages. The treatment may be expensive but it's easily cured.

Ebola on the other hand CANNOT be treated:


There are currently no proven Ebola treatment options that can kill the Ebola virus. Ebola treatment focuses on providing relief of Ebola symptoms as the body fights the virus. This is called supportive care.


Death occurs in 50 to 90 percent of Ebola cases. Ebola research scientists do not understand why some patients are able to recover from Ebola hemorrhagic fever and others are not; however, it is known that Ebola victims usually have not developed a significant immune response to the Ebola virus at the time of death.


I don't understand why you are trying to minimize the seriousness of this outbreak.

The only reason that rabies deaths outnumber ebola deaths is because rabies is much older and much more prevalent, and third world countries do not have access to rabies treatment. If an ebola outbreak were to happen in a populated city I'm guessing it would be pretty ugly.

Care to provide any links to your comments?

Sorry I forgot to add link to the ebola portion of my post, but that has now been corrected.
edit on 1-8-2012 by Corruption Exposed because: link


I'm so sorry but I forgot to add the link to the ebola portion of my post, even after I edited the post for the link so that's mega fail on my behalf. That's what I get for being on ATS while at work. If anyone would like to see where I got the information from it was here...

ebola.emedtv.com...

I apologize if I caused any confusion, I hate it when I forget to add link
edit on 1-8-2012 by Corruption Exposed because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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EDIS is reporting 18 dead.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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Some on here are expertly downplaying the significance of an Ebola outbreak. To their peril. It rears its ugly head in Africa from time to time and is always a crowd pleaser. "18 dead" is an initial indicator that the disease has found its way in to the human meat chain. Of course not much further news comes out of an area where people are reported dying because only idiots and well dressed investigators are allowed in.

Without more information on which strain of Ebola it is, how many have died over time, and how many more are infected and where are they now, then it is difficult to make a determination about the seriousness of any "outbreak".

A real good book on it is called The Hot Zone. Any who want to find out about the history and characteristics of Ebola can get a synopsis and buy the book online. It is a fascinating account of all the outbreaks of the various strains and a breakdown of the threat of one of the most dangerous diseases in "Nature's Arsenal". I read it from cover to cover without stopping. Conspiracy theorists and doom and gloomers should love it because it is real and really scary.

Couple of hi points:
Once infected, a sick person will seek medical help which effectively shuts down the hospital they go to for quarantine, thus limiting medical aid for other cases in the area.

Air borne projectile blood vomit and bile are verrry contagious. As a person is dying they ooze infected blood from every orifice on their body... even skin pores. Euphemistically referred to as "crash and bleed out" the term refers to the last act of a dying victim and the way the virus seeks to find fresh victims. Anyone cleaning up that mess better be well suited and masked to prevent touching any of the "hot virus" infected liquid. It can get in thru the mouth, the eyes, the nose and any cuts.

If all the cases are in a locally confined area, such as a small village the elders have a unique solution to the problem. As soon as the agent is detected, they notify surrounding villages, fell trees across any roads leading to and from and put all the infected people in a central hut. The survivors emerge after the disease has run its course (some symptoms are horrendous; male testicles swell to the size of lemons and turn blue), then the remaining hut and bodies are burned to prevent spreading of the contagion. This old remedy has prevented numerous little "Hot Zones" from spreading into a wider world (so far).

But read all this and much scary more in the book for yourself.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 06:28 PM
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I have a fascination with hemorrhagic fevers & they scare the crap out of me. An individual could become infected today, travel tomorrow, have sex or begin to bleed out in the US or Europe & before he/she is properly diagnosed & proper preventative measures are taken (especially in a small, rural hospital) the race is on. The exact origin & natural habitat of ebola remain unknown but it's believed to be animal-borne. The most frightening scenario is if the virus is used as a biological weapon...entirely possible.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 06:31 PM
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This will not end well or soon.


www.monitor.co.ug...

The health ministry has announced that two more people died on Tuesday evening of Ebola as reports emerged that patients with the haemorrhagic fever at Kagadi Hospital had gone on strike.

According to a statement from the ministry, signed by Dr Dennis Lwamafa, the two deaths, recorded at Kagadi Hospital in Kibaale District, brings the total number of dead to 16 since the onset of the outbreak in July.

The ministry added that of the patients at Kagadi, two have been confirmed to have Ebola while 16 are under watch as results of tests done on them are awaited from the Uganda Virus Research Institute in Entebbe.

The statement indicated that another 14 samples were on Tuesday taken to Entebbe for study, bringing the total number of samples collected since the outbreak to 30. It added that the ministry is actively following up 176 people who came into contact with the dead or the sick and also asked the public to be vigilant but avoid creating fear. But even as the ministry grapples with figures, Daily Monitor has learnt that it took the intervention of the police to quell patients at the Kagadi isolation facility who were protesting alleged neglect on Tuesday.

The patients, complaining about shortage of food and clean water, reportedly stormed out of the isolation facility in the afternoon, sending health workers scampering.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by claireaudient
 


A friend of mine died from H1N1. While many people sat on ATS and called it a false flag. It was really hard for me to read. She was only 26 years old, and very healthy. It got a hold of her, caused her to get pneumonia and she died in four days. I don't know the medical terminology for it, but her lungs collapsed from hemorrhaging.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by usernamehere
 


The fact that they stormed out of isolation is a big concern for them over there. I don't fear it coming to the states. At least for now.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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Are there any historical precedents of outbreaks in non-rural areas in Africa? This is the first I'm aware of where a large city is involved. As I understand it, a misdiagnosis caused someone infected to be transported to Kampala where they later died. I think it will blow over like many other outbreaks unless, there is a transmission chain in Kampala. That is where things will get interesting and potentially dangerous.

I fell like this outbreak is worth of being watched for the above reason and also because of the atypical onset of bleeding and possibly longer incubation time between exposure and symptoms. How often has Ebola been mistaken for Cholera in the past?

Hopefully this is nothing and it doesn't spread further in Uganda or internationally, but the misdiagnosed patient transferred to Uganda followed by a walkout by those under quarantine sounds like the opening act to a plague based disaster movie.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by Longshots
 


news.yahoo.com...

"Uganda's Ebola toll climbs to 16, officials say fears lessen"

Death toll rises....but fears lesson...you got some slainin to do????



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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keeping an eye on this....patients ran out on strike..that can't be good..atypical length of time to start bleeding...something to watch for sure...is the disease evolving...we will see.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by Starchildren
 


Any virus that jumps species shouldn't be brushed aside, especially the bird flu that has now infected seals along the east coast & stands to infect humans. Are you thinking of a pulmonary hemorrhage?



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 08:21 PM
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That Olympics comment is haunting. What a perfect time for a virus to spread, we're doomed



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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Many of the villagers from the affected areas have actually fled the area because believe it is some form of bad luck and were scared, not realizing it was a virus. It's going to be difficult to track these individuals. As a side note, there is a new strain of avian flu that has jumped to mammals. I think researchers discovered that seals are being affected by this new avian flu strain.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by MentorsRiddle
 


Rabies is still the top contender. It has a 99.9% fatality rate, only one person has ever survived intact.


That statistic may change.

Some Amazonian villagers plagued by vampire bats may have survived rabies infections — something that doctors thought was virtually impossible. The scientists' discovery opens hopes of eventually developing an effective treatment for the nearly always fatal infection.

more:
vitals.nbcnews.com...



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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reply to post by usernamehere
 


The patients, complaining about shortage of food and clean water, reportedly stormed out of the isolation facility in the afternoon, sending health workers scampering.

Thats the scary part. Imagine being in a hospital that is suddenly on "quarantine lockdown" to wait out the incubation period in the hopes of not contracting the disease. Every day you submit to blood tests waiting to become infected. That has to be unbearable. No wonder they bolt and hide somewhere, spreading the disease themselves.

Thats part of the insidiousness of it-- even though its not airborne, people who find themselves in close proximity to confirmed cases (like in a hospital) will flea and hide. Thats how it spreads. So now the medical facility is shut down (quarantined) and the infection is quietly spreading out into the city. People will even board a plane in an effort to stay ahead of the rumor mill.

The workers are "scampering" after the escapees or calling other resources in an effort to keep it under control. Imagine the response from outside the town.

"I ain't goin anywhere near there."

Would like to know more about the town this is occurring in, population and any measures to stop planes, trains and automobiles from coming and going.



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by Longshots
 


any news as to which of the original strains this is related to?

Ebola Zaire is the strand that has a kill rate of 90%

Ebola Sudan has a rate of roughly 40 to 50%

None of the other strains effect humans (that I know of though I could be wrong)



Note: The deadliest Ebola found, was right here in the United States, Ebola Reston (found in a Reston Virginia lab). It is the only airborn of the viruses and has a 95% kill rate. The good news is it only effected primates and not humans. But if a strain ever was found that is deadly to humans, watch out.
edit on 1-8-2012 by tw0330 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2012 @ 10:10 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by MentorsRiddle
 


Rabies is still the top contender. It has a 99.9% fatality rate, only one person has ever survived intact.

55,000 people each year die from rabies.

Funny how a virus is only scary when it is new.

Only 1200 have died from ebola since the 70s.
edit on 1-8-2012 by nixie_nox because: (no reason given)



I honestly did not know that about rabies!
Talk about scary!

Has anyone been looking at the Encephalitis trend along the US East coast lately? It's been detected but not contracted by many humans. On the global incident map it linked to this article. 151 people in India have died from Encephalitis this year. Is this unusual?

OP, thanks for this thread! I'll be keeping track of the Ebola status now.





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