X-47B First flight at Pax River

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posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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The X-47B recently made a 35 minute flight from Pax River Maryland for the first time. The flight was chased by an F-18D, and reached an altitude of 7,500 feet and 185 knots over the Chesapeake Bay.


Naval aviation officials chose 11 a.m. on Sunday morning to make history as the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator made its first flight at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.

The tailess, unmanned aircraft designed to land on aircraft carriers made a 35 minute flight taking off from Pax River and flying over the Chesapeake Bay reaching an altitude of 7,500 feet and an air speed of 180 knots. Navy officials considered Sunday’s first test flight a success.

The service’s first unmanned strike aircraft arrived from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., in June to continue its testing regimen. Pax River has a simulated aircraft carrier environment to test the incredible feat of landing an unmanned aircraft on a carrier at sea. Navy leaders hope to make the first X-47B landing on a carrier in 2013.

defensetech.org...



Fortunately for the UCAS it has a heavily reinforced landing gear, as the pilot made a hard landing on return to the field. This is pretty common in UAVs, as pilots don't have any reference to what the plane is doing beyond visual. With a manned aircraft the pilot can feel what is happening as they approach the runway.




posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:06 PM
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Are these able to go into space as well?



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 





Fortunately for the UCAS it has a heavily reinforced landing gear, as the pilot made a hard landing on return to the field. This is pretty common in UAVs, as pilots don't have any reference to what the plane is doing beyond visual. With a manned aircraft the pilot can feel what is happening as they approach the runway.


youd think with all that tech theyd through in some force feedback, a rumble controller at least



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


No, what makes this one unique is that it is going to be the first to be operated off the deck of an aircraft carrier. Prior to now, all the large UAVs have been operated by the USAF from land bases, with the USN recentlay getting into the show.

This is the UAV that lead to all the UFO sightings across the country in the last few months.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by benrl
reply to post by Zaphod58
 





Fortunately for the UCAS it has a heavily reinforced landing gear, as the pilot made a hard landing on return to the field. This is pretty common in UAVs, as pilots don't have any reference to what the plane is doing beyond visual. With a manned aircraft the pilot can feel what is happening as they approach the runway.


youd think with all that tech theyd through in some force feedback, a rumble controller at least


Or have the computers take over landing, once it started its descent.
And no, as far as I know, they do not go into space.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:14 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


No, what makes this one unique is that it is going to be the first to be operated off the deck of an aircraft carrier. Prior to now, all the large UAVs have been operated by the USAF from land bases, with the USN recentlay getting into the show.

This is the UAV that lead to all the UFO sightings across the country in the last few months.


I see control from a mobil carrier fleet = less fuel per uav AMAZING WHAT VIDEO GAME INTERFACING HAS BECAME. Seems it was the plan all the hand eye coordination as a youth with nintendo -atari -sega ect. Now if said carrier goes down do they the x47b as well and their payloads considering nukes within payloads? Interesting crafts non the less SKYNET THOUGH WOULD LOVE THESE if it came on line
edit on 7/31/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 





SKYNET THOUGH WOULD LOVE THESE if it came on line


You mean WHEN it comes on line



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


You would think that they could come up with SOMETHING to help with that issue. I'm actually surprised it hasn't resulted in more damage to the landing gear of other UAVs, or even some landing accidents. Although maybe it has, I haven't kept up with the AIB reports lately.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by Juggernog
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 





SKYNET THOUGH WOULD LOVE THESE if it came on line


You mean WHEN it comes on line


SOL may not approve of this



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 

Definitely a good milestone. Many more to come in the future
Possibly the ones that can handle sick G's and ofcourse possibly escape into much higher altitude with solid rocket boosters for a while before descending into their home base (land or sea). Something similar to Zehst. I have heard and read long time ago about another concept where the plane takes off and enters the space. As the earth turns, the plane descends. This was supposed to take one from NY to Tokyo in 30 minutes


ZEHST[ editby]edit on 31-7-2012 by hp1229 because: add image





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