After 224 Years In Business, America's Oldest Store Is Saying Goodbye

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posted on Jul, 30 2012 @ 10:04 PM
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Originally posted by baphomet420
Now, lets look at overhead... What cost more for the operators, a huge big box store with 20 foot high ceiling, running ac all summer, running literally 100s of 400w hid light bulbs around the clock, paying employees, providing benefits, upkeep of a huge parking lot etc... Or a mom and pop business that with 10 foot high ceilings, a small parking lot, fewer employees that make less and usually get zero benefits...

Obviously, it cost loads more to run a big box store...


Look, the facts show otherwise. Transportation of goods is cheaper when done in volume. This applies to both trucking and shipping from places like China, and to virtually anything else. I forget if it's true that Walmart is responsible for 10% of US imports, but just imagine what sort of buying/negotiating power it gives them.


True, big box stores have more buying power and the initial cost to the cooperation is cheaper than what a mom and pop store can get, however, is it really cheaper???


Ask yourself this: do you see many individual shoemakers around? Same arguments apply about the ceiling, AC, parking, etc.


As for this store in this thread... The OWNER DIED a month ago.. Left it to a son, and the son doesn't have the time or interest to run it... They were not put out of business by a big box store, they were put out of business by a new owner that doesn't have the time and/or interest for it...


I agree.


Stating that small businesses cannot possibly compete with big box stores is a complete cop out... Its a myth...


Look, I typically have a shopping list that takes a whole page, from sugar and flour for our baking needs to some paint to fix the house to tampons for my wife to fishing line to a bicycle helmet for our kid. And then some. Do you expect me to drive around for hours just to visit multiple stores (polluting the environment in the process and burning through my paycheck since gas is not cheap)? Why?




posted on Jul, 30 2012 @ 10:38 PM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 





Look, I typically have a shopping list that takes a whole page, from sugar and flour for our baking needs to some paint to fix the house to tampons for my wife to fishing line to a bicycle helmet for our kid. And then some. Do you expect me to drive around for hours just to visit multiple stores (polluting the environment in the process and burning through my paycheck since gas is not cheap)? Why?


It's called keeping the money in your community. When you spend money in the small stores in your area it stays in your area. This kid just doesn't want to run the store and wants to make some quick cash off it. That's why stores like Walmart has earned the name the small town killer because the majority of the money they make leaves the small town.
edit on 30-7-2012 by buster2010 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2012 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by isyeye
 

More reads
www.heraldnews.com...
edit on 30-7-2012 by rumor21 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2012 @ 11:46 PM
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What a shame. I love old stores like that. They may not have everything but there is just something special about them.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 04:29 AM
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Over here if you want to run your own hair salon it will cost you roughly $6,000 in property taxes a month alone for a fairly small shop. It seems like the only places to get a hair cut now is supercuts, which is a terrible place to go! I have to get my haircut at a pretty underground place which costs $50 per haircut, $30 for eyebrows and my nails? An arm and a leg for what it is. I can't go there often as I would like to, so I go there maybe once every 4 or 5 months. In between sessions I tend to trim my own hair and have learned how to do it just fine, but I go there because I want her to fix / finish the job.

Property tax alone is killing most small businesses around here, and the reason why I know this is because I used to know someone who'd do a lot of advertising and had a lot of demographic data and spoke to thousands of potential consumers each year and taxes was the number 1 reason why they go under. The second thing? Regulations. Big business competition was down on the list but when the government is the biggest reason why your business is failing, you know there's a problem there.

Corporate Government? I think so.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 04:40 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I wouldn't even try either, if I was a senior in college, chasing down a different dream to be honest. Place that old, the town should buy it and keep it as a historical landmark maybe. Or perhaps someone that wants to run a small general store will buy it.
edit on Tue, 31 Jul 2012 04:41:45 -0500 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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More than likely the shop is just about covering itself but it looks like it could do with a facelift and its probably not worth it to invest lets say $100k into dragging the shop up to date just for the supermarket down the road to drop its prices by 20% for 6 months to take all his trade off him and have to sell the business and take a loss

The only thing small shops generally have other the big boys is sometimes being able to spot a trend and pick it up faster than a large store and the personal service you get but that service puts on 10-15% prices compared to the big boys and at the moment where every penny counts people will go elsewhere to save that $30-40 on their shopping

but mostly i bet its the time investment running a shop like that when you are open 12hrs plus every day then you have to fetch stock and sort out all the paperwork/bills it soon overtakes your life and after a month of doing it his son is worn out



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 06:07 AM
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reply to post by isyeye
 


The Brazen Head pub in Dublin is something like 800 years old (opened in 1198).



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by buster2010
reply to post by buddhasystem
 





Look, I typically have a shopping list that takes a whole page, from sugar and flour for our baking needs to some paint to fix the house to tampons for my wife to fishing line to a bicycle helmet for our kid. And then some. Do you expect me to drive around for hours just to visit multiple stores (polluting the environment in the process and burning through my paycheck since gas is not cheap)? Why?


It's called keeping the money in your community. When you spend money in the small stores in your area it stays in your area. This kid just doesn't want to run the store and wants to make some quick cash off it. That's why stores like Walmart has earned the name the small town killer because the majority of the money they make leaves the small town.


Well, sorry but the whole paragraph of yours is rather boring, i.e. it has been repeated in slight variations in this thread, other threads and elsewhere. Question is, am I willing to put 5 hours of my time and 2 gallons of gas into something that can be done in 1 hour and with 0.5 gallon? Why do I need to support WASTE? This quickly escalates to absurd, e.g. someone local is making artisanal napkins for $3 a piece, and while it would be nice to support a budding artist, fact is that I don't need that $3 napkin, I need simple stuff at $0.30. I would still buy local produce at a premium because it doesn't have to be trucked two hundred miles, so I help the environment. And I do that.

And ask yourself this: since so much of what we buy and use is made abroad, how can you call you local store truly local? If anything, it's a small tentacle on the global distribution chain.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I have to tell you, I think your post stinks.

I'm not even from RI, but one of the things that gives this place it's charm is Johnny Cakes. Johnny Cakes are something unique in RI and not just like EVERY OTHER damn cupcake place. There is also charm in a real soda fountain, though I'd go for a gelato any day over a soda. Make mine zabaione.

I think your mentality is one of the problems. No respect for the way it was; just respect for the latest trends.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:38 AM
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Originally posted by WickettheRabbit
reply to post by jude11
 


I have to tell you, I think your post stinks.

I'm not even from RI, but one of the things that gives this place it's charm is Johnny Cakes. Johnny Cakes are something unique in RI and not just like EVERY OTHER damn cupcake place. There is also charm in a real soda fountain, though I'd go for a gelato any day over a soda. Make mine zabaione.

I think your mentality is one of the problems. No respect for the way it was; just respect for the latest trends.


I read your post and concluded that avoiding cupcakes, gelato and soda altogether may be a good latest trend. Why do I need a store that specializes in unhealthy food and tobacco?



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by CaticusMaximus
reply to post by isyeye
 


We are witnessing what is the natural end of a capitalist society as we transition into full blown corporatism and thinly veiled monopolies that control every aspect of life in the country. Mega corporations already own an extremely high percentage of the market share of every industry thinkable.

"Small business" is a thing of the past, now.

And careful what you say about Walmart, remember "corporations are people" and have constitutional rights! You may be guilty of a "hate crime" if you call them names!
edit on 7/30/2012 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)


I completely agree, and I think this is exactly what Karl Marx predicted would be the ultimate end to Capitalism.

Economists argue that there is no such thing as a static business model. All businesses are either growing or shrinking, and if that is the case, then Marx was right and the growing businesses will continually gobble up the shrinking ones, until in the end we have a handful of Mega-Corporations running everything.

And, here we are.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:41 AM
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I read the second article that someone had linked to. I think I see the issue.


The store, in Little Compton’s Adamsville section, had been transitioning from a convenience store to a store featuring largely antiques and collectibles.

Sounds like they were making it a Cracker Barrel. That's no good. You've turned your store into a niche.

If you've always served a purpose and you survived, you should probably continue serving that purpose.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:43 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready

Originally posted by CaticusMaximus
reply to post by isyeye
 


We are witnessing what is the natural end of a capitalist society as we transition into full blown corporatism and thinly veiled monopolies that control every aspect of life in the country. Mega corporations already own an extremely high percentage of the market share of every industry thinkable.

"Small business" is a thing of the past, now.

And careful what you say about Walmart, remember "corporations are people" and have constitutional rights! You may be guilty of a "hate crime" if you call them names!
edit on 7/30/2012 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)


I completely agree, and I think this is exactly what Karl Marx predicted would be the ultimate end to Capitalism.


There have been multiple prediction for rapture and various other ways for the world to end, but few people are waiting with baited breath.


Economists argue that there is no such thing as a static business model. All businesses are either growing or shrinking, and if that is the case, then Marx was right and the growing businesses will continually gobble up the shrinking ones, until in the end we have a handful of Mega-Corporations running everything.


a) anti-trust legistaltion
b) you may have franchises, but lots of businesses are still locally owned and operated



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:45 AM
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Originally posted by WickettheRabbit
I read the second article that someone had linked to. I think I see the issue.


The store, in Little Compton’s Adamsville section, had been transitioning from a convenience store to a store featuring largely antiques and collectibles.

Sounds like they were making it a Cracker Barrel. That's no good. You've turned your store into a niche.


For the past 30 years, small stores have ALREADY been a niche. Just look at this thread -- people praise old soda fountain and some specific recipe for a cupcake. If that's not niche, I don't know what is.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:46 AM
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I'm butthurt.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 08:57 AM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 


For now we still have a lot of small business owners, but we have a LOT LESS than we had just 10, or 20, or 50 years ago. My Dad ran truckstops and convenience stores his whole life, but it is very difficult to run an independent one now. You have to be partnered with an oil company, or own at least 2 dozen stores to control the market somewhat. A single store just can't compete in gas prices, or volume discounts on merchandise. They have to buy their beer, cigarettes, coke, pepsi, and snack goods at higher prices than their competitors, and they have to pay a premium to "own" the gas in their tanks which puts them at major risk for price fluctuations, whereas the corporate stores are making a "commission" on gas, no risk, and getting bulk discounts on all their products so they can price stuff lower.

The Beef O'Brady's here in my town were just all purchased up from the franchise owner and now they are all corporate stores. Just a few weeks ago they were small business owners, now they are corporate restaurants and the previous owner is a general manager instead of an owner.

We had a neat little whole foods coop here in my town, it was super busy for the organic crowd, and gluten-free crowd, but apparently that market was doing too well, because Publix started their "Greenwise" aisle and bled off some business, and then a giant "Earthfare" store opened up down the road a little ways, and now our little coop is kind of a ghost town. It's still open, but it won't be for long.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 09:06 AM
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Originally posted by buddhasystem

Originally posted by WickettheRabbit
I read the second article that someone had linked to. I think I see the issue.


The store, in Little Compton’s Adamsville section, had been transitioning from a convenience store to a store featuring largely antiques and collectibles.

Sounds like they were making it a Cracker Barrel. That's no good. You've turned your store into a niche.


For the past 30 years, small stores have ALREADY been a niche. Just look at this thread -- people praise old soda fountain and some specific recipe for a cupcake. If that's not niche, I don't know what is.



Touche. You win the day, sir or madam.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 10:12 AM
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The guy was going to sell the store anyway.


Ultimately, it was not only the poor economy that the store was not able to survive. It was the untimely death of the store’s owner, Grayton Waite, who died of cancer June 11 at 59. Sunday — the day the store closed — would have been his 60th birthday.



After he got sick, Grayton Waite had planned to retire soon and sell the business to pay off medical bills, but cancer claimed his life before he was able to do so.


For some reason, his 21 year old son had no interest in running an old, run-down antique store



Grayton Waite’s son, Jonah Waite, inherited the business from his father, but decided that running the general store was not for him. The 21-year-old journalism major at the University of Hartford, said that he had discussed his lack of interest in continuing the family business with his father.


Last day at Grays General Store

Can't really blame Walmart for this one.



posted on Jul, 31 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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Actually some of these stores are thriving thank to kitch and nostalgia

www.ultimateidaho.com...

They need to stop trying to compete and reinvent...





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