German U-boat may be at bottom of Labrador river.

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posted on Jul, 28 2012 @ 02:24 AM
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reply to post by GAOTU789
 


Thanks for the great u-boat link and the interesting story as well.

I wonder how much is left of that one they found in the US? By the sound of it, they even threw the kitchen sink at it, yet they can still identify it as a U-boat.
edit on 28-7-2012 by aboutface because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 12 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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If I were a betting man (and sometimes I am), I'd bet that the submarine in the river would be the U-184, if it does turn out to be a german sub at all.

The reason for this is simple. The U-184 disappeared without a trace in November, 1942 during her first actual patrol. She left from Bergen, Norway. Steamed across the Atlantic. Sank the SS Widestone due South of Greenland on the eastern edge of the Labrador sea. Then vanished without a trace.

If you read the article about the Weather Station, you will notice that the U-boat that planted it also departed from Bergen. It is very possible that the U-184 was the first assigned with this task.

She could have possibly steamed her way to the Labrador coast, entered Lake Melville, started up the river and gotten snagged on the sandy bottom. The crew may not have been able to free her or there could have been damage to the hull, resulting in the death of the crew.



posted on Aug, 13 2012 @ 11:27 PM
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reply to post by allenidaho
 


Wow. Interesting theory you bring forward. I'm sure there are people who feel this bears further investigation. Without disturbing the vessel, would they be able to identify it easily enough, keeping in mind that it seems buried?



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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Without disturbing the sub, a positive identification would be very difficult. After 1939, the German Kreigsmarine painted over the hull numbers that were painted on the conning towers of all of their submarines to make identification difficult for allied forces. This was to keep them guessing about German sub operations.

If it has a visible emblem painted on it, an identification could possibly be made that way. Emblems were sort of mascots that sub crews would sometimes paint on the hulls.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 07:48 PM
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There was also a German sub that sat right in the middle of the Gulf oilspill. One of the mines on board the sub washed up in Flordia from all the disturbance from the BP oil spill.

BP found the sub in 2001 and was allowed to put the well right in the middle of the debri field.



BP and Shell Discover Missing WWII German ......
Jun 8, 2001 ... NEW ORLEANS (8 June) - BP and Shell today announced discovery of the long- sought undersea wreckage of the German World War II ......
www.bp.com/genericarticle.do?categoryid=20129...

www.bp.com...
Page is gone now. Cover up?
edit on 14-8-2012 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)
edit on 14-8-2012 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 08:15 PM
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If i can remember correctly ,it was a fact that German subs would drop off spies,and saboteurs during the war.
Somewhere around 200 spies(I may have to Google that however). most got caught,but there are rumors that a few actually got off Scot free.
edit on 14-8-2012 by Szarekh because: Youre not big brother.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by Szarekh
 

Correct,U-202 landed a handful Nazi saboteurs on a Long Island, NY beach in June 1942 .... just a mile away from what would eventually become my family beach house.



posted on Aug, 14 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by Szarekh
 


No U-boat ever docked in a Canadian harbour, but they did manage to land a number of spies, including Lieutenant Langbein in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, on May 14, 1942. Langbein wasn't caught until November 1944, after moving to Ottawa and spending all his money.

On November 9, 1942 U-518 landed agent Werner von Janowski in New Carlisle, Québec, on Chaleur Bay. Von Janowski was caught by the RCMP the following day.

In November 1943 German submariners imprisoned at Bowmanville, Ontario made an unsuccessful escape attempt. They were planning to reach Chaleur Bay, where they were to be picked up by U-536. The RCN got wind of the scheme, and tried to trap the U-boat in the Bay, but it managed to escape. source



posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 10:16 AM
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reply to post by allenidaho
 


Thanks for the info makes perfect sense





 
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