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Man Makes Guns with a 3D Printer

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posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Doesn't matter. If he could make that much of a functioning gun the rest is soon to come. Look at hi-points. They are almost entirely plastic. Boring out a barrel is probably the easiest part, and there will undoubtedly be 3d metal fabricators.




posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 12:07 AM
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reply to post by Shadow Herder
 


Nor would we need the elite


I think in a Utopian society, with all the machines we want to do our manufacturing, would leave people with more free time to cook up better lives. Joblessness is only a fear when bound to the old system. But there would be no more system like it is today. We as individuals could finally pursue our goals in true freedom from slavery.

ETA: but they're going to have to make a faster printer
edit on 26-7-2012 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 12:08 AM
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The 3D printing wars are hotting up, as Thingiverse users upload a design for an AR-15 magazine (holds five rounds, easy to expand to as many rounds as the material will hold without snapping) and an AR-15 lower receiver, a component whose ownership is proscribed or regulated in most of the USA.
boingboing.net...

The one thing that is a reality is gun parts, modifications etc. Big clips can mean big problems



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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It just came to me that it is possible to print the whole 3d gun but the debate is whether it can handle a bullet. Why does it have to be a conventional bullet and not some super hard plastic 3d bullet. It will still be lethal.



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 12:17 AM
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reply to post by Shadow Herder
 


because lead is far more dense than any plastic i know of
and the gun is not entirely 3d printed anyway



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 12:25 AM
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Could a 3D printer produce a fully assembled firearm? I would think it would be pretty hard to produce something with all those parts inside.

Here's a picture of a fully disassembled Glock 17



Im wondering, could you produce each of those parts and then assemble the firearm? To me it seems it would be easier for the printer to just make each part, instead of the entire thing whole.
edit on 26-7-2012 by buni11687 because: (no reason given)


ETA - The parts in the purple outline are extra parts, the owner bought those as upgrades
edit on 26-7-2012 by buni11687 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 12:48 AM
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It will be interesting to see how this all plays out, since the lower of an AR15 is really the only part that needs DROS/background check before purchase
edit on 26-7-2012 by Echotebarknwhale because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


that is how it works you print each piece and assemble them it doesnt print the whole thing at once



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 02:32 AM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


My understanding is that it prints everything and you assemble. It still gives you a huge head start if you were to build your own gun. The metal components would be fairly easy to fabricate for a skilled metal making stuff guy (Didn't mean to talk over anyone's head, I'm an engineer).



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 02:40 AM
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The cool thing about 3-D printing is that you can make anything you want on your computer right now and have the files ready for when you get your hands on one of these printers. Its a hobby to me, I have tons of random things to print when I get ahold of one.


 
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posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 03:05 AM
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I used a 3D printer to print parts for a bigger printer.

Then I assembled and used that bigger printer to make parts for a much, much bigger printer.

After assembly, I printed the world. It fell off the table and now my toe is broken!



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 03:07 AM
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reply to post by XXX777
 


Serves you right! You were supposed to print three more printers before attempting that! RTFM!



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 03:15 AM
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Originally posted by Domo1
I'm waiting for one that can print me out Mila Kunis.

Why stop at just one Mila Kunis?



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 03:20 AM
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It would be nice to purchase an item online and then receive it right away through your printer. So not only would this kill factories, but possibly even a huge chunk of the shipping industry.

Also, it would be awesome if there was a way to make edible food, i spent my entire childhood wanting one of those food replicators on Star Trek The Next Generation.



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 03:23 AM
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Originally posted by Triesta
I just watched a video on how these items are made with the 3D printer. You need material to print out your object layer by layer. So I'm assuming the bigger printers that print out more than neti pots or bunny rabbits will cost you over 10K to begin with. Just imagine trying to print out motor vehicle parts such as tires or combustion engines. It would take mounds of material, energy and you'd still have to have the technical-know-how in order to assemble these products. This will not destroy manufacturing at the level that it's at currently, but perhaps in the future this technology will be upgraded somehow.

There was a time, only about 30+ years ago, when a 10 megabyte hard drive was the size of a dish washer and cost about $10k, and that was in 1980's dollars.

The price of these things will come down until they cost about as much as a dish washer. The only thing that will really stay costly is the materials used to build the stuff, probably, unless it's just made of basic materials. Printer toners are were they make their money for paper printing, not on the printers themselves.

Another thing, I saw a couple of years ago some doctors modified a standard ink-jet printer to print out human muscle organs, such as bladders and in theory new hearts and such could be made too. It literally sprayed the cells into place, layer by layer, until the new organ was built. Do that with cloned cells and you could start making replacement body parts for people...with an ink-jet printer. Tell me that's not weird.



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 03:41 AM
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reply to post by XXX777
 


Print a splint?



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 03:59 AM
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Originally posted by khimbar
reply to post by XXX777
 


Print a splint?


or just print a new toe

Originally posted by LifeInDeath

Another thing, I saw a couple of years ago some doctors modified a standard ink-jet printer to print out human muscle organs, such as bladders and in theory new hearts and such could be made too. It literally sprayed the cells into place, layer by layer, until the new organ was built. Do that with cloned cells and you could start making replacement body parts for people...with an ink-jet printer. Tell me that's not weird.



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 04:05 AM
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Very cool idea, though it could lead to a very slippery slope as I understand it, you must have a Gunsmithing license to manufacture:

en.wikipedia.org...


The ATF inspects the premises of all licensed gunsmiths, with unannounced visits at periodic intervals.


Wonder if they've had their door knocked on yet...



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by LifeInDeath

Originally posted by Domo1
I'm waiting for one that can print me out Mila Kunis.

Why stop at just one Mila Kunis?


You Sir are a scholar and a gentleman. How could I have been so the opposite of selfish.

I really think that 3D printers are going to be the next big thing. I think they are going to be the next generations internet. Actually that makes me somewhat fearful... Internet can be a little scary...

Seriously though I really think this is going to be a huge thing and that we are lucky to get to see it start to take hold. These huge achievements of humanity seem to come faster and faster as we advance.

All that being said, where the F is my flying car? I want one. I want it now.



posted on Jul, 26 2012 @ 05:01 AM
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US aircraft carriers already posses this technology onboard for repairs









 
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