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Has anyone ever used a spectometer to compare the content of a comet and basic seawater and mud/muck

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posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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I was thinking,

If a planet lost its magnetosphere or it reversed poles.
Then it might effect maybe temporally the gravity of the planet.
Then this might allow the planets seas and atmosphere strip off into space.

Wala a new Comet.

If the spectral comparison were close then I would start looking at the poles of planets that were known to have seas that no longer have them. I would think that they might have elongated topography near the old pole location; or just a water deposit at only the old poles location a possible finger print of the final stripping location.

Watcher

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edit on 7/23/2012 by n120by60w because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 11:11 PM
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No, I have not.

It is on my bucket list



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by n120by60w
 


The problem with spectrography in regard to comets and NEOs is that they are not emitting light of their own (additive spectrography) and we very rarely get a bright enough light source shining through them (subtractive spectrography).

None the less, your idea of a cataclysm ejecting material into space, which could form comets, is possible, but only just.

A pole shift or loss of the magnetosphere while being disastrous to us, would not be sufficient to eject enough liquid into space to create a comet. Similarly, a large volcanic eruption would probably not do so either.

We do know of chunks of Martian rock that have been blasted off Mars by impacts from space and those chunks have later fallen down on the Earth, allowing us to examine them. In this way, perhaps a significant enough impact could carry enough ejecta into space to form a small comet.

One aspect of any such impact created comet would be that it's escape from the Earth's gravity would be such that it would assume an orbit relatively close to the Earth. In most comets we see a different orbit indicating that the comet most likely originates somewhere on the far outer edges of the Solar System and is falling inwards towards the Sun.

Most comets have a long period of orbit, indicating the vast distances that have been travelled.


edit on 23/7/2012 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2012 @ 04:14 AM
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reply to post by n120by60w
 


niether the polar orrientation , nor the earths magnetic feild have any significant effect on gravity



posted on Jul, 24 2012 @ 07:01 AM
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They wouldn't want to talk about it if they did find a remarkable relationship.

Some comparisons have been made however. Supposedly, there are substantial differences between levels of deuterium in comets and Earth's ocean water. Back when water was consider a rare commodity in the solar system, I suspected that comets got their water from Earth as they approached the Sun. (They use the water and other jetted materials for a temporary insulation of the main body.) Since Titan and other small bodies further out there contain water, it will be interesting if it is found any relationship that comet water and any of them.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 12:54 AM
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Originally posted by Aliensun
They wouldn't want to talk about it if they did find a remarkable relationship.

Some comparisons have been made however. Supposedly, there are substantial differences between levels of deuterium in comets and Earth's ocean water. Back when water was consider a rare commodity in the solar system, I suspected that comets got their water from Earth as they approached the Sun. (They use the water and other jetted materials for a temporary insulation of the main body.) Since Titan and other small bodies further out there contain water, it will be interesting if it is found any relationship that comet water and any of them.


I think it should be looked at.






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