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SOPA Emergency IP list - For when the tyrants try to take down the internet (SAVE THIS LIST)

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posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by TechUnique
 


Thanks for the info> I will be sure to keep it. I have a feeling we will soon be needing these and more.




posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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Help me out here, Barney-style, folks.

Let's say "THEY" turn off Wikipedia (I know there's much more to it than simply turning it off, but I'm just trying to convey the simplicity with which I need this to be explained) :

What difference does it make if I type in www.wikipedia.com OR the IP numbers? It's still the same destination, isn't it? If they blocked access or whatever, would IP address even get me to the site I'm trying to get to?



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


Dear MojaveBurning,

There is a company called ICANN (under a contract with the United States government) and they assign domain names to the ip address. Basically the web name is associated to the ip address; but, if we shut off the program that associates the two, you would have to know the actual IP address. The OP is correct and is doing a good service. My only concern is that a couple of months back a change was made to IPs and I don't know if this will work for all sites because we would have to know the 32 digit new IP possibly. I asked the OP this question and am hoping he has a better understanding than I. It may be possible to use either the old or new addresses.



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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Originally posted by AQuestion
reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


Dear MojaveBurning,

There is a company called ICANN (under a contract with the United States government) and they assign domain names to the ip address. Basically the web name is associated to the ip address; but, if we shut off the program that associates the two, you would have to know the actual IP address. The OP is correct and is doing a good service. My only concern is that a couple of months back a change was made to IPs and I don't know if this will work for all sites because we would have to know the 32 digit new IP possibly. I asked the OP this question and am hoping he has a better understanding than I. It may be possible to use either the old or new addresses.


I am sorry but I do not have an answer for you!
I wish I did because I am really interested now.
Sorry



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by AQuestion
 


The web currently uses 32-bit IP addresses (IPv4 - 000.000.000.000 - DEC) and IPv6 uses 128-bit IP addresses (0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000 - HEX)



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by TechUnique
 


Dear TechUnique,

No issues and thanks again for providing the information that you did. I know that very few sites have converted to the new Ipv6; but, it is planned that most will within a couple of years. By the way, I am not a tech guy; but, I have worked with them in designing the business rules for systems. I only know about the IP thing because I had done extensive research on who controls the internet and privacy issues as they relate to the new technologies. If I ever come across an article that does answer the question, I will try to remember to post it. Peace.



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by Morpheas
 


Dear Morpheas,

You are absolutely correct, my little brain messed up the numbers in my head. The shear number of possible IP addresses is so immense that I still can't quite wrap my head around it. It is like a quintillionzillionquintillion, it has a name that I cannot imagine. I thought billions was a lot growing up.



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by AQuestion
 


Thank you for taking the time to answer! I saved the list, hopefully we never have to find out if they are still the accurate addresses to get us where we want to go!

S&F to the OP for drawing this to our attention (even those of us who may be a bit technically un-inclined!)



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 10:30 PM
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Forgot to answer your question.. when IPv6 is used you will be able to type in the IP address to get to the site, but it is long.



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by MojaveBurning
Help me out here, Barney-style, folks.

Let's say "THEY" turn off Wikipedia (I know there's much more to it than simply turning it off, but I'm just trying to convey the simplicity with which I need this to be explained) :

What difference does it make if I type in www.wikipedia.com OR the IP numbers? It's still the same destination, isn't it? If they blocked access or whatever, would IP address even get me to the site I'm trying to get to?


If you know the IP for a server, you can skip all the steps in the middle and go straight to it.

If you use a domain name, it has to be translated into an IP address first, then off you go. That's where the Domain Name Servers ( DNS ) comes in. DNS is like the index page of a really big book and there are copies of it all over the place, even in your own computer.

So, if they block access to sites by blocking these DNS lists, you can create your own for your computer, like in the OP, or you can use just the IP address to skip the DNS translation process.



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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I think this wont work, seeing how the government already has a way of shutting down every computer being used now in the us i remember reading somewhere on ats about this..it would be a much easier way of stopping people from connecting with each other than shutting down the internt...just use a simple kill code and as soon as everyone connects to the net wammo computer dies!! and not useable anymore



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 12:04 AM
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Originally posted by Drezden
How can I access websites using their IP addresses on a mac?


It's the same as any other operating system..

http : //
http : / / 192.168.0.1 etc, whatever the actual IP address you want to go to.

first posted and saw it made a link, which I didn't want...

Assuming you are using a browser on a mac machine, it's the same as any other web browser no matter what operating system.
edit on 21-7-2012 by alienreality because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by TechUnique
 


Firstly it should be noted that this list has been floating around the internet for almost a year now, and there are now much longer versions. Secondly, this list is now completely useless because the ISP's don't simply edit the DNS table any more. People in the UK will know what I'm talking about... they recently banned ThePirateBay in the UK because of a law suit taking place.

I was speaking to my friend from the UK and I suggested for him to access the websites via the IP address and even change his DNS server so he doesn't have to rely on the ISP DNS server to resolve website IP's. To my surprise those methods DIDN'T WORK (according to him). Meaning, the ISP's in the UK are actively filtering out connections to certain IP addresses in real time.

There's now way to beat that method using this technique. One must use a proxy or a VPN if they wish to access TPB from within the UK. And you can bet your bottom dollar if the ISP's in the US or anywhere else start to block websites like the UK, they won't simply alter the DNS table, they will filter out certain IP's too. They aren't stupid, they know our tricks.
edit on 21/7/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 04:47 AM
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With a simple workaround like this, I am believing that there is no DNS shutdown looming.

Why would websites continue to operate for only a very select few who stored their IP? It just seems odd.

The gov't would then seem to be the type to halt websites operated out of the US...to prevent their use. That as the entire point to begin with.

I don't see them saying, "HA! Gotcha! No more internet because we shut down DNS servers!" but then everyone just started sharing IPs...and they say "Oh, no, guess we didn't."

Does that really sound like a mistake they'd make? Sounds very strange to me.

Companies pay a lot of money for their servers and internet connections...If they were only getting a few hits (by comparison)...then, I guess they'd try to save money and throttle down.

It all sounds strange though. I don't know about this. If they can't shut down home users at the ISP level, then they shouldn't bother with DNS.



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 05:09 AM
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reply to post by TechUnique
 

Sorry OP, but this is utterly pointless. It actually sounds like a "please pass this on to everyone" type hoax.

If "they" get you cut off from the internet, it will be because they can order your ISP to cut you off. If this is done, then having a list of IP addresses won't do you any good - as you won't be able to get on the internet at all.

If they order the banning of certain websites (like ThePirateBay in the UK) then they will order the ISPs to block certain IP addresses, not the domain names - that's not how things work. By the way, the ISPs have fought the court order in the UK all the way, and my ISP makes only the most minimum effort to block ThePirateBay. It blocked its main site, but several others are freely available, even without a VPN (which gets round any IP blocks).

Copies of the domain name databases are held all over the world - your ISP has its own DN servers, which will resolve domain names you type into your browser.



Wherever you decide to host your website, the network you are on must have its own DNS servers. In fact, it is an industry-wide standard to have at least two DNS servers or more. These servers will act as the authority for your domain name because your network provider will put a special entry in their DNS server as it relates to your domain name that says: YOU ARE HERE! Technically this is known as an "A" record for "Authority".

There are literally hundreds of thousands of these DNS machines world wide. They ARE the yellow pages of the internet and they contain information about your domain name. Keep in mind that no single DNS server holds all the domain names for the internet; they only hold the names that they are responsible for, and a few pointers to find the rest.

Some DNS servers strictly store names while others are doing the work of providing lookup services for computers that need to look up names. Many DNS servers do both. Technically, the server that is responsible for a particular domain is called the "Authority". Remember the "A" record?

more here: www.indichosts.net...

If you really want to keep your own database, then you can actually set up your own DNS:

www.webmonkey.com...


And if you are worried about your government snooping on you, or ordering the blocking of IP addresses, then sign up for a VPN. You might be best choosing one from somewhere like Sweden or Iceland, which have strong data protection laws.

edit on 21/7/12 by FatherLukeDuke because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 05:15 AM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


The ideology of letting everyone else do the heavy lifting is what got us in this mess in the first place.



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 07:11 AM
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I think there should also be a list for Tor, where to download it or maybe details of how to access it. It's certainly more important than chatroulette lol
edit on 21-7-2012 by Equ1nox because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 07:20 AM
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Do you think that a government takeover of the internet will just get rid of or control DNS? The argument presented here is good when a DNS server goes down, but the government will do much more than that. I would imagine that ALL TCP connections would be taken down, or some type of master ACL would be used at ISP routers to block the vast majority of sites. I assure you when the government takes control of the internet, you will not be able to access a site by going around DNS by using the site's IP address. This method is good to use at work in most cases to get around sites that your IT department has blocked, because most companies only block the FQDN and not the IP because most major sites have several IP addresses and it is a pain in the neck and very time consuming to block all of the IPs.



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 07:34 AM
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reply to post by FatherLukeDuke
 


Sorry, I am not too tech savvy. This article is better than the list: 8 technical methods that make the protect IP act useless



posted on Jul, 21 2012 @ 08:38 AM
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Originally posted by TechUnique
reply to post by FatherLukeDuke
 


Sorry, I am not too tech savvy. This article is better than the list: 8 technical methods that make the protect IP act useless

Ah OK, thanks, in that context it makes more sense.

It seems, partly because of how easy it would be to get round, they are removing DNS filtering from the bill anyway:

en.wikipedia.org...

It was such a dumb idea, it's hard to fathom how it even got that far - politicians are clueless when it comes to the internet.

edit on 21/7/12 by FatherLukeDuke because: (no reason given)




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