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Builders putting pesticide tubes in walls...

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posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
that's all well and good but just so you are aware, insects live in tents also. insects are not a bad thing and i believe they are much needed, but since bedbugs began carrying antibiotic resistant strains of MRSA, we are going to have a problem. along with several diseases carried by insects in and around the home, we have to do something or people will be dropping like flies. no pun intended.


No, you don't have to do anything really. You are basically arguing to commit an act of state-sanctioned violence by commissioning the use of harmful substances on people against their will.

Honestly, for most applications the use of pesticides and chemicals is completely unnecessary. The person refuses to change their environment or clean up after themselves to such a degree that they now have pests, or they choose to live in an environment that is filthy.
edit on 19-7-2012 by SyphonX because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready

Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


DDT was never safely contained anywhere, DDT is a Persistent Organic Pollutant and very highly persistent in the environment. It has a reported half life of between 2-15 years and is immobile in most soils. Its half life is 56 days in lake water and approximately 28 days in river water. Routes of loss and degradation include runoff, volatilization, photolysis and biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic).

neither was Chlordane for that matter.




That was kind of my point though. It did persist, and was effective for decades, but it was below the foundation, and inside the walls, so the kids and pets never came in contact with it. In my opinion that is better than taking a weaker solution and spraying the surfaces over and over again where the kids and pets are constantly in contact with it.

I realize it is more dangerous to the environment, but they could mitigate that by applying it sparingly and only where it wouldn't contact storm water runoff or erosion. As long as it was applied directly below the house, and to the framing timbers, then it wouldn't ever enter the environment.


yes very true indeed and i didn't mean to come off as putting down your post amigo. today's insecticides are much safer than those of the past but limiting the target area is still important and this method seems to do that well.

i knew i would take a beating coming into this thread and for good reason what with the plethora of corruption, greed and pollution we have today. i just wanted to help people see that this is not another boogie man they should waste their time worrying about. we have plenty of real issues already and don't need made up ones.



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by SyphonX

Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
that's all well and good but just so you are aware, insects live in tents also. insects are not a bad thing and i believe they are much needed, but since bedbugs began carrying antibiotic resistant strains of MRSA, we are going to have a problem. along with several diseases carried by insects in and around the home, we have to do something or people will be dropping like flies. no pun intended.


No, you don't have to do anything really. You are basically arguing to commit an act of state-sanctioned violence by commissioning the use of harmful substances on people against their will.

Honestly, for most applications the use of pesticides and chemicals is completely unnecessary. The person refuses to change their environment or clean up after themselves to such a degree that they now have pests, or they choose to live in an environment that is filthy.
edit on 19-7-2012 by SyphonX because: (no reason given)


if you say so, although i beg to differ and please don't ever accuse me of doing anything to anyone in a forceful way, it's slander and un called for.



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
i knew i would take a beating coming into this thread and for good reason what with the plethora of corruption, greed and pollution we have today. i just wanted to help people see that this is not another boogie man they should waste their time worrying about. we have plenty of real issues already and don't need made up ones.


I don't know who you are, or where you are coming from with this nonsense, but insectides and pesticides are not "safe". You claim they are "safer", that does not mean they are "good to use" or even should be used with such widespread application.

Might I spray your chosen pesticides in your face? Would you mind if I put some in your daily drinking water? It's perfectly fine and reasonable, as you won't be receiving it in a dose that would be considered immediately harmful.



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 


I agree with you that this new method sounds safer than the current methods of spraying. The only thing I worry about with this new method is vapor escaping into the room when the occupants are not expecting it. If the system is automated, then it is possible that it could spray while kids are playing near a drafty area of a wall and they could inhale the liquid vapors. All in all it seems much safer than spraying openly in the room like most pest controllers do currently.

Of course, there is always the danger of a malfunction. It would be a bad thing if a valve stuck and flooded the walls with liquid pesticide, but its a bad thing when freon lines burst, or sewer lines, or hot water lines, so that is something we already deal with.



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle

Originally posted by SyphonX

Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
that's all well and good but just so you are aware, insects live in tents also. insects are not a bad thing and i believe they are much needed, but since bedbugs began carrying antibiotic resistant strains of MRSA, we are going to have a problem. along with several diseases carried by insects in and around the home, we have to do something or people will be dropping like flies. no pun intended.


No, you don't have to do anything really. You are basically arguing to commit an act of state-sanctioned violence by commissioning the use of harmful substances on people against their will.

Honestly, for most applications the use of pesticides and chemicals is completely unnecessary. The person refuses to change their environment or clean up after themselves to such a degree that they now have pests, or they choose to live in an environment that is filthy.
edit on 19-7-2012 by SyphonX because: (no reason given)


if you say so, although i beg to differ and please don't ever accuse me of doing anything to anyone in a forceful way, it's slander and un called for.


care to look over the 100+ page scientific review of GMOs i provided you?

which is written by GMO and genetic scientists?

have you done ANY research on this issue?







posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by SyphonX

Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
i knew i would take a beating coming into this thread and for good reason what with the plethora of corruption, greed and pollution we have today. i just wanted to help people see that this is not another boogie man they should waste their time worrying about. we have plenty of real issues already and don't need made up ones.


I don't know who you are, or where you are coming from with this nonsense, but insectides and pesticides are not "safe". You claim they are "safer", that does not mean they are "good to use" or even should be used with such widespread application.

Might I spray your chosen pesticides in your face? Would you mind if I put some in your daily drinking water? It's perfectly fine and reasonable, as you won't be receiving it in a dose that would be considered immediately harmful.


nothing is safe, living is not safe and perhaps safer was a poor choice of words but be that as it may, the insecticides we use today in the home are much less volatile and toxic to humans. the gas you put in your car is one of the most toxic and volatile materials we have today and it's carcinogenic so did you stop driving?

btw i spray myself everyday by accident when the wind decides to blow the wrong way and you and i have both been drinking it for years from the improper applications of the past, of chlorine based insecticides.



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by SyphonX
 



Might I spray your chosen pesticides in your face? Would you mind if I put some in your daily drinking water? It's perfectly fine and reasonable, as you won't be receiving it in a dose that would be considered immediately harmful.


Long-term exposure is bad. Short-term exposure might be bad for weaker systems like an infant crawling on a floor, but spraying me in the face with it wouldn't do very much. I've been sprayed with all kinds of things. I've eaten stuff that likely had overspray on it, I used to LOVE eating my burger with my hands all greasy from automotive work, and when you're done you have greasy hands with little pink fingertips, LOL!

I'm not sterile, I'm not any more insane than I ever was, and I don't have any health problems.

IN FACT, a physics teacher of mine had a study posted on his door where lethal dosages of arsenic, spread out over a 12 month period would actually INCREASE lifespan of rats, instead of killing them. The same study was repeated with radiation and other poisons with similar results. Stressing our bodies forces them to recover and adapt, and it can be beneficial rather than harmful.



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 


I agree with you that this new method sounds safer than the current methods of spraying. The only thing I worry about with this new method is vapor escaping into the room when the occupants are not expecting it. If the system is automated, then it is possible that it could spray while kids are playing near a drafty area of a wall and they could inhale the liquid vapors. All in all it seems much safer than spraying openly in the room like most pest controllers do currently.

Of course, there is always the danger of a malfunction. It would be a bad thing if a valve stuck and flooded the walls with liquid pesticide, but its a bad thing when freon lines burst, or sewer lines, or hot water lines, so that is something we already deal with.


well vapor escape shouldn't be a problem unless they would use aerosol based material which i wouldn't advise and especially when anyone is occupying the structure. i would find it difficult to believe they would even be able to do this since the current pesticide labels to not label them for this type of application and i can't imagine they will each (manufacturer's) spend a million dollars to add it to the label in any amount of time.

automated will never be an option for a home, it's just far to dangerous to even entertain the thought of it.



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I see your point but my concern is that the house ages, it shifts and gaps form. Three decades down the line, is it still encased?





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