Bloodroot - The Amazing Lost Herb

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posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


i glanced through your post, you should have a disclaimer that bloodroot is very poisonous, I may be wrong but I think it can be fatal. I know for a fact that it IS poison though.

Here's a video from my favorite survival/self reliance teacher:


its at 3:30, but watch it all




posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 10:21 AM
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Excellent find, Op.. ty ty



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Realtruth
 


Very cool!


I have used Prid my whole life and it works for everything from splinters to spider bites. It is a "drawing salve" made of mostly coal tar I think.

I will definitely be checking out the blood root now. Can you tell us what herb to plant to have this root? Is the flower in your picture called bloodroot?


Yes the picture in the OP is the Bloodroot plant.

In season, or the Spring you can find them for sale on Ebay in root stock, or full potted plants.

Forget trying to grow them from seeds unless you have a green thumb, because you have to place the seeds in cold storage (Freezer) for at least 3 month prior to planting them, then they are difficult to germinate.

I bought a hundred roots from Ebay this spring to plant in around my house for ground cover and for medicinal value too.

I am happy to see this thread got the attention it did, and this really warms my heart because it means people are waking up to alternative/natural solutions.

Bravo to all that are wise enough to look into this wonderful plant.

edit on 18-7-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 10:40 AM
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How to Grow Bloodtroot

www.kittycooks.com...

This is probably the best guide on the net to growing Bloodroot if anyone is interested. It also has some great pics of the entire plant.




Plant bloodroot in moist, shady deciduous woods. Bloodroot grows in the wild throughout eastern North America. Each flower rises from a single stock and only blooms for a few days, but the colony will bloom for about two weeks.



Leave bloodroot undisturbed. Four inch lobed leaves unfurl after the flowers have dropped their petals. An elongated seed pod rises soon after. Ants carry the seeds away to eat the fleshy part, then place the seed in their nest debris. The seed germinates and your colony will grow.

Plant in the shade under deciduous trees (trees that drop their leaves in the fall). Your colony will bloom about the same week that box elder trees flower. Bloodroot is an ephemeral (ee-fem-ur-l), meaning the leaves will die down and go dormant over the summer. Place next to a shade plant like hosta that will fill in the space later in the summer. Deer do not eat the flowers as the plant contains a toxic poison nor are the plants bothered by insects or disease. This is a low maintenance plant.

Bloodroot flowers are one of the earliest pollen producing plants. Honeybees and pollinating flies cover the flowers when they open on sunny days. Bees need early blooming plants to sustain them before moving on to pollinate our cultivated plants in summer. Human development has greatly reduced habitat for native wildflowers, protect and nurture bees by planting bloodroot in your garden.

Wear gloves and wash hands after contact. Bloodroot is named for the orange/red rhizome (root) that contains a reddish sap. The root sap contains the toxin sanguinarine. This can burn skin tissue in sensitive people so care should be taken when transplanting. Native Americans used the sap for medicinal and ceremonial uses and combined the sap with oak tannin to create a colorfast yellow-orange dye.

Contact your local nature center to find out where you can visit established native colonies. It is an unforgettable sight to see a hillside covered in bloodroot flowers in spring.

Do not dig plants from the wild as bloodroot is considered endangered. Check with a local garden club or plant rescue organization that saves plants from development. Purchase plants from a garden center or internet catalog. Ask a shade gardening neighbor if they have some to share. Plant and grow bloodroot in your shady garden and you too can enjoy this enchanting spring delight.


Enjoy
edit on 18-7-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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Here is a story about a man who had skin cancer on his nose. He did a very good job of documenting his experience. billolearyphuket.com...

I found several stories about people who treated cancers with this. It is also called, cansema and black salve.

I also discovered that some forms of skin cancer can be successfully treated with egg plant. They make a product called "Curaderm" out of it. I saw this on Dr. Oz.

I don't mean to hijack your thread. I LOVE this topic and am very passionate about it.




posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 11:40 AM
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My dad showed me bloodroot when I was a kid. I used to dig it up and put it on my skin to pretend I was wearing war paint when playing cowboys and indians. Or we would mash it up and put it on our shirts to simulate being dead. No one ever got sick or got a blister or anything from it.

But I also read that buttercups make skin lesions when rubbed on body parts but it never happened when I tried it. They also say amanita muscaria is poisonous, but I have eaten hundreds of them and all it ever did was make me feel drunk.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


I first encountered bloodroot or "red puccoon" as a teenager in the Appalachians. I found a plant I didn't know and pulled a sample to take home to identify, and noticed that when I pulled it, the root had broken, and there was blood oozing out of the root, looking like capillaries bleeding. That was sort of eerie to me.

I never used it for anything. It's pretty potent stuff, and to be honest it sort of spooked me. There is also a "yellow puccoon" that we used for wounds. I think the common name for that is "golden seal".



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 11:56 AM
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Originally posted by Ookie
My dad showed me bloodroot when I was a kid. I used to dig it up and put it on my skin to pretend I was wearing war paint when playing cowboys and indians. Or we would mash it up and put it on our shirts to simulate being dead. No one ever got sick or got a blister or anything from it.

But I also read that buttercups make skin lesions when rubbed on body parts but it never happened when I tried it. They also say amanita muscaria is poisonous, but I have eaten hundreds of them and all it ever did was make me feel drunk.


Awesome!

Did you know that bloodroot was used by Native Americans as a dye for clothes, War Paint on their skin, and medicinal purposes?

www.herbalremedies.com...

edit on 18-7-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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pretty cool, info thanks for sharing.

I got one on my back id love to try it on, but after hearing the story about the ladies nose getting eaten away by using the stuff scares me, so I think ill just go have it cut out lol



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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Originally posted by A-Dub
pretty cool, info thanks for sharing.

I got one on my back id love to try it on, but after hearing the story about the ladies nose getting eaten away by using the stuff scares me, so I think ill just go have it cut out lol


Like I said that lady was dramatic, and she was talking from a point of friend, of a friend told me so.

Look on Amazon and you'll see all the positive feedback.

I had one cut of years ago and regret it to this day. I wish I had known about bloodroot back then.

My suggestion would be to start on a small mole, like I did on the back of my leg, then I removed 4 others in more obvious areas later. I am now Mole free.


Good-luck on whatever choice you make.
edit on 18-7-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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The lady with her nose eaten off must have had a very bad case of cancer. The stuff doesn't harm healthy tissue. You can test it on a part of your skin that is free of moles or suspicious areas.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


I can not decide what impresses me the most. The Bloodroot or that amazing beard!



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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cool thread!!! Have a mole just on the edge of my beard line, have had it since birth (or very close anyway) and have always wanted to get rid of it. This might be the best option without having to take time off work to get it removed. And it looks pretty safe too!

Thanks OP for bringing this to peoples attention!



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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Has anyone heard of bloodroot working on a keloid?
2nd



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


I'll try this stuff, seems okay.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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Originally posted by VoidHawk
Good post but a warning.

A man I used to know accidentaly scratched a mole. The cancer spread through his body and only a few weeks later he was dead. So I'm not sure the idea of pricking moles is a good one.


Absolutely untrue. Total shenanigans.

If the cancer spread it was pre-existing, scratching a mole does not cause cancer.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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Thank you for posting this.

I use medical grade 15% hydrogen peroxide for skin problems and for sinus problems. It does something similar, but not like the bloodroot does. My lump on my leg dried up and fell off without any irritation or redness, but it was not deep like a wart or cancerous cyst.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by Love thy neighbor
Has anyone heard of bloodroot working on a keloid?
2nd


That is an interesting question and one that I unfortunately do not have the answer.

Check Amazon.com and the product Dermatend, or their site maybe you could contact them directly and ask if anyone has had success with keloids.

Goodluck to you.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 11:09 PM
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Great Videos.
I love the fact that you can find cures for things in the wild that doctors make people pay thousands for,
and it's all free.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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thanks, could come in handy for some



herbs for the win





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