Trigger for past rapid sea level rise discovered

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posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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I been thinking about sea level rise and from an underedumacated view i had this progression.

Certainly glaciers are melting at a heretofore unheard of rate.

Okay... so that water all flows into the ocean and... increases sea levels? Lets assume it does.

That increased sea level translates to more surface area of water on the planet?

Which increases cloud cover through evaporation?

Which cools the planet a little more?

And increases rainfall and snowfall overall?

Which decreases surface area of water around the globe?

That decreases sea level in a kind of balancing self regulating way?

Dunno...




posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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we are destined to become silt
unless Richard Branson puts his tea cup down and gets us off this rock



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


That's just it...

Which way is Earth headed?

1.) Gets so hot that the Earth is triggered into another Ice age when the Ice caps melt and flood the oceans with fresh water which neutralizes the ocean currents due to lack of salinization causing a massive drop in temperature?


2.) Earth continues to heat up causing massive amounts of coastal flooding and oceanic evaporation which increases humidity and we return to a very tropical planet with mass amounts of humidity and rain forests?


3.) Just more of the same....Just much more intense?



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Its a waiting game. Im leaning toward number one because from my view it appears that way.

Geologically speaking it seems to be heading this way from my studies of the past. Ive only been pondering if for a little over a year now, so more time is probably needed. Ya know.... When it actually becomes one of the three you mention. Lol

What about methane? Well... Hold up.... Now im getting far off topic. Or am I?? Sea level really doesnt coincide with ice age does it? Lol sorry.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by MamaJ
 


Sure it does (Sea Level and Ice Age).

The more water that is locked up in ice, the lower the sea levels. The less ice locked up the higher the sea levels.

Basically. Huge ice sheets weigh a lot and push down however, but not enough to compensate.

But I agree it's all a waiting game at this point to see what happens. The real question is:

How long do we have to wait before we know?

(one good thing for me: my house is 350 feet above the curent sea level, heh.....)



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by phroziac
 


funny thing about water, you dont miss it until 7 billion people store 1000 gallons of it.EACH

how does your sphere look now?
edit on 16-7-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


If the Northern arctic ice cap melts {Which it is predicted to do} the oceans will not rise. The whole ice displacement vs water deal there. But, If the Southern ice Cap melts then we will have rising oceans because most Antarctic ice is on land.

Theoretically that melt off will raise ocean levels.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 10:42 PM
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Flooding at a global level would of had a devastating effect on humans considering they lived on the coasts or inland on rivers. These events could of been the reason why man began to build huge stone structures around the world such as the great pyramid and the pyramids, massive walls and megaliths around the world as to protect them from another local or global catastrophe.

edit on 17-7-2012 by Shadow Herder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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Something I'm not seeing mentioned here with increasing surface areas of the oceans expanding is the Carbon Dioxide cycle.

Larger surface areas of water capture more Carbon Dioxide out of the air. The more Carbon Dioxide in the air, the warmer the planet, the less Ice there is. With larger surface areas of water capturing more and more Carbon Dioxide, the planet then begins to cool.

Once the planet cools sufficiently, Ice builds up, accelerating in grown as more and more Ice reflects solar heating back out, causing also the oceans to grow smaller until such a point that Carbon Dioxide uptake by the oceans is too small, whereby Carbon Dioxide levels begin to build again.

With building Carbon Dioxide levels, Heat is gradually and progressively trapped in the atmosphere in the greenhouse effect, causing ice melt, and the cycle circles over and over again.

So far the Carbon Dioxide cycle has precipitated an Ice Age roughly every 10,000years.

With all the industry and Carbon Dioxide creation of modern man, it's anyone's guess how this is going to effect the cycle.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by MamaJ
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


And so I wondered after reading the text you offeredand linked to, is sea level on the rise now? If so..... What should we do, if anything?


Is that a serious question?

If the levels were going to rise significantly I would suggest moving to one of the coastlines and buying the lowest property I could find, preferably close to sea level......NOT!

I am at 5000' elevation so I am not too worried yet....



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 12:32 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by intrptr
 

That's just it...

Which way is Earth headed?

Right now? Towards the hot side? If all the glaciers are melting away (and they are) then that must mean a continuing trend from some glacial past. Thats the slow but steady heating of the planet from all the glacial ice that covered it thousands of years ago. Has to be because the evidence is the before and after pictures of steadily disappearing glaciers. But then again, the poles (specially Antarctica) are "removed" from the seasons and remain steady. Also, the whole of earths freshwater is only about 3% of total H20 on the planet.

Fresh/Saline


1.) Gets so hot that the Earth is triggered into another Ice age when the Ice caps melt and flood the oceans with fresh water which neutralizes the ocean currents due to lack of salinization causing a massive drop in temperature?

Yah, there is that unknown element of the thermal conveyor belts that deliver tropic heat to northern latitudes. If that gets stalled...


2.) Earth continues to heat up causing massive amounts of coastal flooding and oceanic evaporation which increases humidity and we return to a very tropical planet with mass amounts of humidity and rain forests?

Increased Humidity would then be balanced by increasing cloud layers which would actually cool the planet? Add seasonal cooling and maybe cancels each other out.


3.) Just more of the same....Just much more intense?

I would only add another element to the mix. That of Carbon emissions. Oil, coal, and deforestation are all returning the eons of captured carbon back to the atmosphere where it is building. This both blocks and traps heat resulting in "localized" problems, usually stemming down wind from cities and industrial areas.

That is an upward trend as evidenced by population growth and modernization of remaining (large) population centers. That in my mind is the one steady increase that also correlates with the steady melting of earths fresh water ice stores (like glaciers, Greenland and mountain tops). Don't know really if there is that connection.

I just keep hearing about less and less old forest habitat and more and more coal fired plants and automobiles.

How many coal plants and automobiles is China building per Annum?

deforestation

New Coal



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


If the Northern arctic ice cap melts {Which it is predicted to do} the oceans will not rise. The whole ice displacement vs water deal there. But, If the Southern ice Cap melts then we will have rising oceans because most Antarctic ice is on land.

Theoretically that melt off will raise ocean levels.


I understood that the temperature of the water creates the extra displacement because the molecules are bigger. Ice is more tightly held, but the ocean waters would have more volume regardless of the ice sheets.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 01:37 AM
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I just wanted to thank everybody for contributing and keeping the discussion civil.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 01:49 AM
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I wrote a rather long paper on this exact subject (underwater cities) for my Anthropological Archaeology course. After my presentation, my professor sat there silently...my entire class too. Then a question from the back came quietly, "Ummm....well....what....I mean.....who...............never mind." I sat their perplexed by what he was trying to say, but I guess the subject just baffled these kids who had never before looked for history outside of their own basic school books. I was blown away. Then I said "Do you seriously think all of humanities true trials and tribunes are in a couple of books you've read in your lifetime at school?" Then the questions began to fly.

45 minutes later and as everyone was leaving the room, my professor approached me as I packed my things. She was a very intelligent doctor of anthropology; She said "Can I get a hardcopy of your paper? I'd like to look into these sites more in-depth." I said, of course, and handed her my paper. She smiled and gave me a grin and said "Aced the presentation." I nodded and left the class.

I didn't show for class for a week after that; when I finally arrived back in town from a climbing trip in CO, she watched me come into the room a few minutes late. She nodded as I took a seat somewhere in the middle of the class. She had already began her lesson and as I flipped through the book to find the page were on, I looked up confused...she caught my look and said "Don't mind the book anymore this semester. We're going to really learn a thing or two this go around." I was amazed. My paper and my answer to a fellow students question so intrigued her that she had changed her lesson plans to create an open research lab for just our class where we spent the second half of the semester researching and learning about these ancient underwater civilizations. It was by far the most interesting and perplexing class I ever took in school. That summer, she actually emailed me and invited me to Chile to dig near a coastal city that was made of mud...in search of evidence that they may have migrated up into the mountains as the seas rose! I declined as I had already started my business and was much too busy to go to Chile...no I do not say thi lightly but I wholly regret not spending that summer in Chile with her.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 06:39 AM
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Great post, as always, Slayer.

I´m from the far south and I enjoy quite a lot reading your posts. (and english is not my native language, so please excuse me)

Actually I´m reading Fingerprints of the Gods, wich (among other topics) touches the rapid ocean rise theory.

I´m not saying that your post actually "proves" it, but I believe (at least) that a global flood (not in a "religious" way, btw) of some kind really happened and the meltdown at the end of the last Ice Age could be the trigger for that.

You´ve done a lot of research on the topic. And the estimation of land now below sea level equals China + Europe...

AND THEY WERE NOT "PRIMITIVE PEOPLE"... NOT AT ALL....

Great post, really great post



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 06:54 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


If the Northern arctic ice cap melts {Which it is predicted to do} the oceans will not rise. The whole ice displacement vs water deal there. But, If the Southern ice Cap melts then we will have rising oceans because most Antarctic ice is on land.

Theoretically that melt off will raise ocean levels.


Oh I know, I was refering to MamaJ's asking about Ice Ages and sea levels.

What about Greenland's ice? I know it's not as much as the Antarctic's, but I think it's only a rise inches from that?

I don't remember I'm afraid.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 07:46 AM
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Originally posted by mwood

Originally posted by MamaJ
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


And so I wondered after reading the text you offeredand linked to, is sea level on the rise now? If so..... What should we do, if anything?


Is that a serious question?

If the levels were going to rise significantly I would suggest moving to one of the coastlines and buying the lowest property I could find, preferably close to sea level......NOT!

I am at 5000' elevation so I am not too worried yet....


Well no. It wasnt a serious question for ME! The question was followed by an answer as well.

Im in TN so the only thing I have to worry about would be the Mississippi River, as far as I know. Nasville sits like a bowl and I am twenty miles east with higher elevation. The city in which I live has flooded....flooded over the weekend. For it to flood my home though it would have to come up ...waaaaay up another thousand or so ft. Oh, and I have a boat too... So not concerned.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by phroziac
Too much water now? I thought we had to omg conserve the water. We only had a 900km sphere of water on earth, remember? Cant we just drink it all away:
seriously, sometimes environmentalists forgrt the simplest things.

If everyone was a prepper and stored 1000 gallons of water in drums in their basement, what would this do to the sealevel? Can we just send the extra water to indiana, michigan, or egypt, where theyre having droughts?

More seriously, the water level in the st joseph river is ridiculously low. Seems like lake michigan too, but its hard to tell due to continual erosion. We had a ship that hit a sandbar last year and had to turn around. The port had to have emergency dredging done in the dead of winter. We are about 500 feet above sea level, is the water being lost to the oceans or what? im confused.

Also, im sure everyone knows our atmosphere is being stripped away by the solar wind at alarming rates (if arnie gunderson did the math). This includes water. Hmm.

Anyway people need to stop building things right on the coast. That said we have a lot of erosion problems where i live, and im surprised the street i live on hasnt fallen into the lake yet. Were on a bluff 100 feet above the lake. And beachfront property is cool...hmm...


What an ignorant post. First, most of earth's water is non drinkable, that's why we should conserve it. Second, just because lake something is ridiculously low it doesn't mean that, globally, water levels are rising. Third, everyone knows our atmosphere is being stripped away? You should take the tinfoil hat out and start believing some studies, not every conspiracy based crackpot.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 08:06 AM
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Once the planet cools sufficiently, Ice builds up, accelerating in grown as more and more Ice reflects solar heating back out, causing also the oceans to grow smaller until such a point that Carbon Dioxide uptake by the oceans is too small, whereby Carbon Dioxide levels begin to build again. With building Carbon Dioxide levels, Heat is gradually and progressively trapped in the atmosphere in the greenhouse effect, causing ice melt, and the cycle circles over and over again. So far the Carbon Dioxide cycle has precipitated an Ice Age roughly every 10,000years. With all the industry and Carbon Dioxide creation of modern man, it's anyone's guess how this is going to effect the cycle.
reply to post by Druscilla
 


Good point!

This is something I wonder myself.

Ya know, im sure it has nothing to do with nothing but when my Grandfather passed five years ago his last spoken words were " there is too much carbon". Talk about spooky.

When I joined this site and began researching different topics of interest I came across so many articles talking about carbon being on the rise, when I researched more is when I came across past history in regards to ice age. Just thought I would throw that out there. Lol

Another issue for me, in my opinion is methane. Is it increasing too? It seems there are many who think they know it is or isnt but I havent read anything I consider conclusive yet.

Where does it play into the recipe of the perfect ice age?

Also, if this is something that is indeed evident ( ice age) then we will no doubt begin seeing new land appear.... Right?



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Brilliant thanks Slayer.

Not really a surprise though, to most of us on here (as this is the sort of thing we tend to love and look into). Still, confirmation is always a wonderful thing!


Other factors to link in include the shifting of the Atlantic Jet Stream winds, heavily linked to ice coverage in the Northern Hemisphere. Basically, less ice coverage equals Jet Stream further south (hence current weather problems in the US / Canada and UK).

I have to confess that a tiny bit of me (no jokes!
) is secretly hoping for a Day After Tomorrow style sudden ice age - sea levels will drop enough for us to see what is left from the last time it happened! That has to be worth a few extra pairs of socks and gloves.





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