Trigger for past rapid sea level rise discovered

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posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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Trigger for past rapid sea level rise discovered

Dr Gregoire, lead author of the study, said: “We didn’t expect our model to produce such a rapid sea level rise. We got really excited when we realised that the events we simulated corresponded to real events!”

The cause of rapid sea level rise in the past has been found by scientists at the University of Bristol using climate and ice sheet models. The process, named ‘saddle-collapse’, was found to be the cause of two rapid sea level rise events: the Meltwater pulse 1a (MWP1a) around 14,600 years ago and the ‘8,200 year’ event. The research is published today in Nature.....

Towards the end of the last ice age, at the time of mammoths and primitive humans, the climate naturally warmed. This started to melt ice at increasingly high elevations, eventually reaching and melting the saddle area between the ice domes. This triggered a vicious circle in which the melting saddle would lower, reach warmer altitudes and melt even more rapidly until the saddle had completely melted. In just 500 years, the saddles disappeared and only the ice domes remained.



I thought I'd stop in and post this story. It's an interesting read .

I wonder how many possible prehistoric coastal cultures/early civilization may have had to uproot and head inland or up fresh water river valleys during this period to avoid the sometimes quickly sometimes slowly rising ocean? The debate IMO as to whether there are ancient now submerged prehistoric cultures and possible early civilizations sites still rages.

We have some evidence of man made structures and habitats being discovered beneath many of the worlds coastlines and near shore locations.

As always, Stay tuned.

edit on 16-7-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


And so I wondered after reading the text you offeredand linked to, is sea level on the rise now? If so..... What should we do, if anything?

Here is what I found. oceanservice.noaa.gov...


Yes, there is strong evidence that global sea level gradually rose in the 20th century and is currently rising at an increased rate, after a period of little change between AD 0 and AD 1900. Sea level is projected to rise at an even greater rate in this century. The two major causes of global sea level rise are thermal expan- sion of the oceans (water expands as it warms) and the loss of land-based ice due to increased melting.


The article goes on to say its not uniformly distributed. Some places are not as high but the mean average is.

It seems they expect it to rise even more.



Global sea level is projected to rise during the 21st century at a greater rate than during 1961 to 2003.


So.... Should some move to higher ground or what? Lol

Also, I would expect to find some places decreasing and when it does to a point... There will indeed be lost treasures to find.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 02:46 PM
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Nice thread. The interesting thing to notice is the approximate time frame provided when the levels rose. Many ancient civilizations and cultures have some form of mythology associated with it around that particular time frame.
edit on 16-7-2012 by hp1229 because: edit content



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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If it can happen once...then twice, it can happen again and I believe many of us alive today will be witness to at least the beginning of the process.

There are many studies showing that it is indeed underway already but as to how rapid and severe it will be is still in debate.

But of course it will all be blamed on Global Warming and not Climate Change as it's the only way to blame us and tax us for it.

S&F.

Peace


edit on 16-7-2012 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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Too much water now? I thought we had to omg conserve the water. We only had a 900km sphere of water on earth, remember? Cant we just drink it all away:
seriously, sometimes environmentalists forgrt the simplest things.

If everyone was a prepper and stored 1000 gallons of water in drums in their basement, what would this do to the sealevel? Can we just send the extra water to indiana, michigan, or egypt, where theyre having droughts?

More seriously, the water level in the st joseph river is ridiculously low. Seems like lake michigan too, but its hard to tell due to continual erosion. We had a ship that hit a sandbar last year and had to turn around. The port had to have emergency dredging done in the dead of winter. We are about 500 feet above sea level, is the water being lost to the oceans or what? im confused.

Also, im sure everyone knows our atmosphere is being stripped away by the solar wind at alarming rates (if arnie gunderson did the math). This includes water. Hmm.

Anyway people need to stop building things right on the coast. That said we have a lot of erosion problems where i live, and im surprised the street i live on hasnt fallen into the lake yet. Were on a bluff 100 feet above the lake. And beachfront property is cool...hmm...



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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Another great, informative thread OP !

As Jude11 speculated above, surely there is a good chance of a recurrance of such an event ?

It has been reported in the last couple years, big bits of ice, have worked themselves loose.

Question is, how much is too much ?



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 02:58 PM
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S&F, great thread!

Here's some further examples of underwater discoveries of lost civilizations;

Alexandria, Egypt: Off the shores of Alexandria, the city of Alexander the Great, lie what are believed to be the ruins of the royal quarters of Cleopatra. It is believed that earthquakes over 1,500 years ago were responsible for casting this into the sea, along with artifacts, statues and other parts of Cleopatra’s palace.

Bay of Cambay, India: A few years back discovered the remains of a vast 9,500 year old city. This submerged ruin has intact architecture and human remains. More significantly, this find predates all finds in the area by over 5,000 years, forcing historians to reevaluate their understanding of the history of civilazation in the region. The find has been termed Dwarka, or the ‘Golden City,’ after an ancient city-in-the sea said to belong to the Hindu god Krishna.

Yonaguni-Jima, Japan: Discovered by a dive tour guide some twenty years ago, controversies have arisen around a mysterious pyramids found off the coast of Japan. These structures seem to have been carved right out of bedrock in a teraforming process using tools previously thought unavailable to ancient cultures of the region.

Havana, Cuba: A team of scientists continues to explore megalithic ruins found in the Yucatan Channel near Cuba. They have found evidence of an extensive urban environment stretching for miles along the ocean shore. Some believe that the civilization that inhabited these predates all known ancient American cultures. So far, only computer models of this mysterious underwater city exist.

North Sea, Europe: A lost natural landscape was found recently under the North Sea, once occupied by human hunter-gatherers over 10,000 years ago. What were once rivers, lakes and oceans are now all at the bottom of the sea, only made known through digital mapping. Scientists theorize that this amazingly well-preserved landscape was at the heart of an ancient civilization spread across Europe.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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Here's some other discoveries;

The coast of Morocco - Single stones recorded, each one larger than 'two-storey houses', have been discovered incorporated into a wall extending for 9 miles under the sea.

Loch Ness, Scotland - A Sonar scan revealed the presence of underwater prehistoric stone ruins.

Bahamas - The famous 'Blue holes', with underwater stalactites and stalagmites.

Yucatan and Belize - Ancient Mayan roads continue out from the coast to destinations undersea.

North of Venezuela - An underwater wall was found that extends for at least a hundred miles.

Madeira - It was on the 'Ampere Seamont', north of Madeira that a Russian expedition reported in 1977 that underwater photographs showed pictures of walls, pavements and steps.

The coast of France - Out in the Mediterranean, in front of Marseille, the passages of an underwater cliff have revealed a series of mine shafts and smelting facilities.

The coast of Georgia - There is another long and wide underwater road in the Atlantic off the coast of Georgia.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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The sea levels will rise again. It's as certain as tax.
I think I saw some where on here before that back in the 60's, the American govt. Approached the Australians and came up with a plan to lower lake eyre and run a channel from Adelaide to the lake it's self so it could be used to soften the blow of rising see levels.

Personally I think the guys at pine gap want to have a beach near by...



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
If it can happen once...then twice, it can happen again and I believe many of us alive today will be witness to at least the beginning of the process.

There are many studies showing that it is indeed underway already but as to how rapid and severe it will be is still in debate.

But of course it will all be blamed on Global Warming and not Climate Change as it's the only way to blame us and tax us for it.

S&F.

Peace

True enough. It does appear that history is repeating itself. If we learn from the past then we would obviously be approaching another ice age? If so, history again should teach us something. Geological upheavel maybe? Just throwing thoughts around.

I am anxious for other artifacts to emerge and other cities....Im ready for what is to come.... :-) with a smile on my face too.

edit on 16-7-2012 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by Ericthenewbie
S&F, great thread!

Here's some further examples of underwater discoveries of lost civilizations;

Alexandria, Egypt: Off the shores of Alexandria, the city of Alexander the Great, lie what are believed to be the ruins of the royal quarters of Cleopatra. It is believed that earthquakes over 1,500 years ago were responsible for casting this into the sea, along with artifacts, statues and other parts of Cleopatra’s palace.

Bay of Cambay, India: A few years back discovered the remains of a vast 9,500 year old city. This submerged ruin has intact architecture and human remains. More significantly, this find predates all finds in the area by over 5,000 years, forcing historians to reevaluate their understanding of the history of civilazation in the region. The find has been termed Dwarka, or the ‘Golden City,’ after an ancient city-in-the sea said to belong to the Hindu god Krishna.

Yonaguni-Jima, Japan: Discovered by a dive tour guide some twenty years ago, controversies have arisen around a mysterious pyramids found off the coast of Japan. These structures seem to have been carved right out of bedrock in a teraforming process using tools previously thought unavailable to ancient cultures of the region.

Havana, Cuba: A team of scientists continues to explore megalithic ruins found in the Yucatan Channel near Cuba. They have found evidence of an extensive urban environment stretching for miles along the ocean shore. Some believe that the civilization that inhabited these predates all known ancient American cultures. So far, only computer models of this mysterious underwater city exist.

North Sea, Europe: A lost natural landscape was found recently under the North Sea, once occupied by human hunter-gatherers over 10,000 years ago. What were once rivers, lakes and oceans are now all at the bottom of the sea, only made known through digital mapping. Scientists theorize that this amazingly well-preserved landscape was at the heart of an ancient civilization spread across Europe.


And soon:

New York City: After landing their craft on a small island, explorers from a distant galaxy have discovered what may have been an ancient walled city lost to rising waters over 20,000 years ago. It appears that these walls were erected to keep the inhabitants in rather than enemies out thus causing some to speculate as to the downfall of this once great warrior culture. The only remnants of personal belongings remaining appear to be made of an oil based substance which may be a clue to what many theorize as Plastic, a material long ago abandoned and thought to be a contributing factor to what may have caused the waters to rise.



Just couldn't resist.

Peace



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Well played



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I like the thread, i just domt like the way the word it. "primative man". 14,000yrs ago man had built the Sphynix and many other wonders. Not quite sure just how "primative" we truely were!



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by jrmcleod
 


Agreed on the "Primitive" man quote. I too can't stand when they toss that in there as if it's a fact. When one considers some of the overwhelming evidence such as beautifully painted cave art from periods preceding these events by as much as 10 to 15 thousands years in some cases then it's obvious they were not primitives



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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Very good report Slayer, they have another type of mechanism now. That would mean a rise of over 5 centimeters a year so a person with an average 50 year life span would have seen the water rise 2.5 meters (assuming worst case) on average.

Yeah that would certainly cause them to move inland if they weren't already. The need for fresh water and to be away from the salt spray zone for agriculture would have caused them to move up river.

Some other comments:



Alexandria, Egypt:


Yes but that was earthquake related and also occurred during the historic period



Bay of Cambay, India


Actually no that was the claim but subsequent investigation has left more questions than answers, at best the question is still being debated but the evidence for a 'city' is very weak




Yonaguni-Jima, Japan


Consensus is that this is natural occurence, no sign of a culture to make (there is a culture in that area but it was a small coastal/hunter/gathering society) it is possible it was modified by man but no evidence of that exists



Havana, Cuba


This appears to be a mis-idenification, no tangible evidence has been found



North Sea, Europe:


Long noted as a flooded area only a few artifacts have been found and those point to a hunting-gathering culture



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I wish I could afford the membership/purchasing fee to read that full report. Guess I'll have to wait until the info trickles down to us 'commoners'. lol Especially if said report also takes into account isostatic rebound of plates during these times too.

As always Slayer, thanks for keeping your ear to the ground when I can't. S&F for you.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by Mad Simian
 


I noticed that too. That's a shame but we do have the provided link discussing the findings though



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 07:49 PM
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S+F, thank you for the post.

Better understanding of the mechanics involved in sea level rises will help paint a more complete picture of what some of our earlier civilizations had to face.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
If it can happen once...then twice, it can happen again and I believe many of us alive today will be witness to at least the beginning of the process.

There are many studies showing that it is indeed underway already but as to how rapid and severe it will be is still in debate.

But of course it will all be blamed on Global Warming and not Climate Change as it's the only way to blame us and tax us for it.

S&F.

Peace


edit on 16-7-2012 by jude11 because: (no reason given)


I think I read some stats that roughly 70-75% of the world's population lives within 20 miles of the coastline.

I know sea level rise always kicks my arse in the Civilization game by Sid Myers.

I always think in the begining to back my cities off a few squares in anticipation but it never works for me...always conquering some kucklehead who put his there and end up losing a great number of population to it late in the game.

I think if the sea were to suddenly rise today we'd see the same thing. Personally, I don't understand why the government of all organizations insures people who build in areas that are just itching for a flood.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by phroziac
 


Its the potable water we are lacking, we would need to start harnessing the melt water now which we are not doing. The problem is making the water usable, even ocean water can be safe if processed, that requires infrastructure, and no one seems to want to build that.





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