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Theory: Autism, simply a fault of perception and priority

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posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 05:13 AM
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I originally started to plan this post as a response to this Breaking Alternative News topic but decided to give it a space of it's own.

I read new theories of Autism causes surfacing constantly but they always feel just a bit of course. The main reason being that they incorporate outside chemical, psychical or psychological influences. There are to much plausible history. Also the continuing reduction of age requirement to diagnose. So I thought I'll go through my theory in a short step by step.

So lets start by stating the facts
The most commonly accepted sides to an individual being on the autism spectrum are social, emotional and focus disabilities in combination with the sensory overload phenomena.

Then lets look at the effects of autism as a whole and utilize the debug approach and look for the missing part of "cause and effect" by tracing back the different symptoms to a common fundamental function.

If we removed the ability to perceive humans as higher priority, what would be the effect?
The ability to prioritize gives us grater control over what is important and what is not. Without it one reduce the time spent processing the important stuff and increase the time spent on processing less important stuff. In effect normalizing the focus time.

Breaking it down
Emotions are primarily expressing the loss and gain of that which is important, social skills are recognizing that which is important to communicate and cooperate, and focus is merely the action of consciously prioritizing.

The ending question
Could it then be that autism spectrum simply implies difference in the grade of normalization of priority and symptoms being the result of the unconscious reducing focus on learning the main building stones of our civilization?
edit on 15-7-2012 by ShadowBase because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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Maybe some people with Autism have a better understanding of how to prioritise things than those of a nuerotypical mind do. Think of it like the old school survival test. You have crashed on a deserted island and you have these items. 1 weeks food, 1 weeks water, a tarp to keep out of the weather, a compass, a flint, a bottle of Vodka and a knife, but you can only choose 3 items to carry. Which 3 would you take and why?

Maybe Autistic people just think differently. There are no wrong answers to the question above, its just what you think is better for survival. Then some Autistic people might have a more simplistic way of looking at things, without considering things like small talk or conversation for conversation sake as being all that important.
edit on 15-7-2012 by R6A6W6 because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-7-2012 by R6A6W6 because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-7-2012 by R6A6W6 because: I edited because title was edited



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 05:57 AM
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Originally posted by R6A6W6
I was waiting for others to reply before I make a purposeful reply, but I think you really need to Edit your title first. Put an E in the word theory. I'm not nit picking, just saying it might get better responses that way. Then we can start to discuss what you have stated.


Yeah, I don't even think that is going to help. I don't understand anything s/he is saying and I WANT to understand. I'm trying to understand.




posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 06:00 AM
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reply to post by ShadowBase
 


I'm not quite sure what you are trying to say, but I think you are well-read on the topic of autism, as am I. I find autistic people to be very intellectual and logical. I get along fine with them. They have a purer view of the world than the rest of us, and are not burdened with the corruption that comes from being socially aware.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 06:08 AM
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reply to post by R6A6W6
 

Shameless mistake to do in a topic title. You saved my but at least a little bit. thanks

I think I have read myself blind. If someone could point out what and where it is unclear/confusing I would be extremely thankful
edit on 15-7-2012 by ShadowBase because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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reply to post by ShadowBase
 


No worries ShodowBase, I edited out that part of my post.


I keep putting a capital A in Autism myself, but then I am on the autistic spectrum of disorders myself. I have Aspergers syndrome.
edit on 15-7-2012 by R6A6W6 because: (no reason given)


I can understand what you are saying.
edit on 15-7-2012 by R6A6W6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 06:48 AM
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Originally posted by R6A6W6
I can understand what you are saying.

Wonder why. haha. I'm trying to put it in a way that everybody can understand, expressing throu the barrier may well be the hardest part of being on the spectrum in my opinion at least.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 07:18 AM
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Originally posted by R6A6W6
Maybe some people with Autism have a better understanding of how to prioritise things than those of a nuerotypical mind do. Think of it like the old school survival test. You have crashed on a deserted island and you have these items. 1 weeks food, 1 weeks water, a tarp to keep out of the weather, a compass, a flint, a bottle of Vodka and a knife, but you can only choose 3 items to carry. Which 3 would you take and why?

Maybe Autistic people just think differently. There are no wrong answers to the question above, its just what you think is better for survival. Then some Autistic people might have a more simplistic way of looking at things, without considering things like small talk or conversation for conversation sake as being all that important.


Been re-reading your reply hoping I come up with another way of explaining my theory. Thought I'll just simply reply to you and hopefully something comes up.

I think you misunderstood me a tiny bit. My point being those on the spectrum has less of a ability to prioritize. But to be clear I'm talking about unconscious priority of senses and thought. The thinking "completely different" phenomena could also be explained within this construct as a normalized way of thought would make choice and opinion be less biased in a way. Effectively making the whole as important as anything individually.

We're basically saying the same only difference is I mean the subconscious.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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I need more time to digest what you just said, I know its hard to explain what you are trying to explain. So far I get you are saying that (subconsciously) people with autism are less efficient at prioritising what is more important.

Do you mean like when someone forgets to use their manners for example?

I would like to hear more on this from some other members if they could understand it better. I know there are big barriers for those on the spectrum to have to overcome just to communicate. So if you are one of those people don't be afraid to join in too



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 08:49 AM
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Originally posted by R6A6W6
I need more time to digest what you just said, I know its hard to explain what you are trying to explain. So far I get you are saying that (subconsciously) people with autism are less efficient at prioritising what is more important.

Do you mean like when someone forgets to use their manners for example?


Almost. They don't forget, it's unnatural. Manners are a way of showing what is important. What is important can be what you look at, what details you notice in a picture. While talking to someone, why do neurotical's visually focus on face and eyes. Why do they say one thing but mean something else. What words is it that is important and not in what's said that changes the meaning. If all the words have the same importance the message changes and the understanding becomes literally or as they often say; simple.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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With the invention of the "autism spectrum" almost anything could be said to be slightly autistic. The psychiatrists have moved from making up vague subjective criteria that means you either have something or you don't to the spectrum. So now it is not a matter of if someone has autism but how bad. The latest trend of diagnosing autism is a product of the new criteria nothing more.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 10:00 PM
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The autism rate is increasing:



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 10:48 PM
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This also explains why the autism rate is increasing


DSM I



The DSM-I was originally released in 1952. Although autism was recognized as a unique condition as early as 1943, it was not included in the DSM. Instead, children who exhibited autistic-like symptoms were diagnosed under the schizophrenic reaction, childhood type label.

DSM-II



The second release of the Diagnostics and Statistics Manual of Mental Disorders came in 1968. As with the first release, autism was not included as a separate diagnostic category. In Roy Richard Grinker’s book, Unstrange Minds, the DSM-II included the following language: “the condition may be manifested by autistic, atypical and withdrawn behavior.” Children exhibiting these behaviors were diagnosed as schizophrenic, childhood type.

DSM-III



In 1980, the DSM-III was released and we finally see the inclusion of autism as a separate diagnostic category. At this point, there was only one autism designation and it was entitled infantile autism. There were only six characteristics listed and each of these six symptoms must be present in order for an individual to be diagnosed with infantile autism. Due to some controversy surrounding the descriptor infantile, this category was changed to autistic disorder in 1987.

DSM-IV



The most recent complete release of the DSM, the DSM-IV, occurred in 1994. At this point, the category of pervasive developmental disorders and several subtypes were added. In addition to autistic disorder, a diagnosis could be made under the categories of Asperger’s Disorder, Rett’s Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).

Besides the inclusion of four new subtypes, drastic changes were made to the criteria that needed to be met in order to receive a diagnosis of autistic disorder. The current release of the DSM has a list of 16 different symptoms used to describe autistic disorder and a patient only needs to exhibit six of the 16 to receive the diagnosis. This is in stark contrast to the language used in the 1980 release of the DSM-III.

The DSM-V is currently in the works and there are large groups of individuals working on changing the language used to describe the various pervasive developmental disorders. Autism has evolved through the four releases of the DSM and it is only natural to expect that it will be refined even further in the DSM-V.

Read more at Suite101: History of Autism in the DSM: Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders | Suite101.com suite101.com...





www.dsm5.org...

DSM-V





Autism Spectrum Disorder

Must meet criteria A, B, C, and D:



A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across contexts, not accounted for by general developmental delays, and manifest by all 3 of the following:

1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity; ranging from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back and forth conversation through reduced sharing of interests, emotions, and affect and response to total lack of initiation of social interaction,

2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction; ranging from poorly integrated- verbal and nonverbal communication, through abnormalities in eye contact and body-language, or deficits in understanding and use of nonverbal communication, to total lack of facial expression or gestures.

3. Deficits in developing and maintaining relationships, appropriate to developmental level (beyond those with caregivers); ranging from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts through difficulties in sharing imaginative play and in making friends to an apparent absence of interest in people

B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. Stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (such as simple motor stereotypies, echolalia, repetitive use of objects, or idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Excessive adherence to routines, ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior, or excessive resistance to change; (such as motoric rituals, insistence on same route or food, repetitive questioning or extreme distress at small changes).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; (such as strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper-or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of environment; (such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects,
edit on 15-7-2012 by DavidWillts because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-7-2012 by DavidWillts because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by DavidWillts
 


continued DSM5


4. Hyper-or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of environment; (such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, fascination with lights or spinning objects).

C. Symptoms must be present in early childhood (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities)

D. Symptoms together limit and impair everyday functioning.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 05:45 AM
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Originally posted by ShadowBase

Originally posted by R6A6W6
I need more time to digest what you just said, I know its hard to explain what you are trying to explain. So far I get you are saying that (subconsciously) people with autism are less efficient at prioritising what is more important.

Do you mean like when someone forgets to use their manners for example?


Almost. They don't forget, it's unnatural. Manners are a way of showing what is important. What is important can be what you look at, what details you notice in a picture. While talking to someone, why do neurotical's visually focus on face and eyes. Why do they say one thing but mean something else. What words is it that is important and not in what's said that changes the meaning. If all the words have the same importance the message changes and the understanding becomes literally or as they often say; simple.


I get what you mean now, good theory
and the DSM or diagnosis system, trys to pick up only on all the symptoms displayed. Which are varied and different for each individual because they are all symptoms of the same 1 root problem.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by DavidWillts
 

If my theory is true it would also explain the increase as we have less and less personal contact with other people and as a result those who only have it to a small extent would be more noticeable as they get less social contact and learning opportunities.

reply to post by R6A6W6
 

Exactly
edit on 16-7-2012 by ShadowBase because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by ShadowBase
 


You clearly do not understand autism very well.
www.sciencedaily.com...
Look up autism and mirror neurons.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 04:27 AM
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Think backwards! Five hundred years ago there was no electricity. There may have been copper wires but not wiring. Glass had been invented but it's use was decided by popular fad-like needs - tiling, ceramics etc.

In the ensuing years our understanding of specialized human mental traits has become very diverse. How and why do humans focus in on something and sometimes - eureka - a streak of genius occurs out of which things like Tesla's energy coil is discovered then forgotten about until new understanding make what Tesla invented sensible to others of the world who can put it to use.

Leedscalen is another example - how to move huge blocks of coral by oneself in the middle of the night - let alone quarry the blocks.

I find that autistic people just simply do not think or experience subjective thought in the same way that most people do. Their social barriers are that we have no idea what they are expressing until after many years of getting to know that person.

Why rock back and forth? - "it helps me focus that I am still alive and here in this small little world of cosmic space."

Why does the wind bother you? " Can't you hear it sounds like a million ghosts going weee through the trees and if I go outside the wind will make me feel cold."

"Its hard for me to distinguish the voices I hear in my head which are my thoughts and what I think you are thinking and maybe esp of what you are trying to get me to say, think or do. Plus I also hear everyone else who is talking along with what I think they are thinking and so forth. That is why I take so long to answer people because I have to distinguish everything from everything else in order to focus in on what you are actually saying or asking. And the correct answer is - what was that question again? Oh, yeah, why do I take so long to answer questions and the answer is what seems like seconds to you is an eternity for me or maybe one thousandth of a second in time and I store the answer in my mind for a time when I can string the words together to make sense to you, For me it is only moments before I can answer your question but which might be days for you."

I can hear colors can you? I smell what you are saying - do you smell my words? I have to look beyond the colors of your aura before I can see you - to me your aura colors are fascinating maybe even more fascinating than you the person.

It might be easy for you to block out all the sensory input you believe confuses me. But sensory input given to me in certain ways makes my life a little more sensible or bearable or memorable.

Have you noticed that now that I know how to use the typewriter that I don't need to see the typewriter in order to type. I just have to know where you put it today.

IMHO - autism is just a different way of experiencing time and space and is a lot more fun than how most people see and use time and space. But we are all captivated by our own individual time and space. We are all fairly comfortable with what we know or have learned about our life around us and few of us accommodate changes.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by R6A6W6
 

Can I ask you a question?



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 04:58 AM
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reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


I see. You offer 1 link to 1 article and that proves you know more about autism than the op does? There are so many different articles to read on the subject and each one tries to pin point the real cause, but are any of them actually on the right track?

You could have easily pulled out the article that says immunisation is to blame, its been debated over and over and it still can't be proven one way or another.

If you truly want to understand autism, ask someone who has some form of the disorder, as they will know more than anyone else.

garygnu, well said, star for you.

titzycronulla, ask away.






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