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holy bouncing water droplet vid

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posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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10,000 fps motion capture reveals some amazing behaviour of a water droplet

question,
drop a droplet of water into water and what happens
from redit



vid shows the you proberly guessed wrong
i know i did



xploder
edit on 13-7-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


Check this out
....



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 12:16 AM
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Does this count?




BTW, Very cool vid.....

S&F

edit on 14-7-2012 by sonnny1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by SarnholeOntarable
 


I do not think the title of the video you posted is accurate. The droplet is not being "atomised" by the vibration, however is is being shaken to the point where it breaks down into much smaller droplets, which you can see flying off in all directions as the pulses of vibration shake the main droplet to the point where it looses its cohesion.

In order to atomise the droplet, one would have to be breaking down the molecular bonds keeping the oxygen and hydrogen atoms together, and I see no evidence of this occuring in the video. I am not even confident that such a thing can be achieved with vibration alone. I would have thought heat or current would need to be applied. There are power production methods out there that rely on the energy exchanges as water is broken down into hydrogen and oxygen and then reformed... very interesting stuff.

Good video, just had to be accurate about the title though.



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 08:06 AM
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Explanation: S&F!

Very cool and simply reinforces Newtonian mechanics.

Every action has an equal and OPPOSITE reaction.

This is clearly seen between the interplay of the droplet and the surface tension of the larger body of water it is falling into.

Anybody who has studied large craters on the moon would be aware of this effect.









Personal Disclosure: It also reinforces why I pee on the side of the toilet bowl and not directly into the water as its clear nasty aerosols can be liberated by such physical effects! [It's also much quieter!]



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 08:17 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 05:51 PM
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Very cool!!!

I wonder if the theoretical mathematicians would see it as going on to infinity since it keeps dividing in half each time in comes in contact with the water surface...


yeah, yeah, I know it would have to stop when it reached the molecular level regardless of how many times it went but still cool to think about!



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by TrueBrit
reply to post by SarnholeOntarable
 


I do not think the title of the video you posted is accurate. The droplet is not being "atomised" by the vibration, however is is being shaken to the point where it breaks down into much smaller droplets, which you can see flying off in all directions as the pulses of vibration shake the main droplet to the point where it looses its cohesion.
...

Good video, just had to be accurate about the title though.


Atomize: definition

2. (Physics / General Physics) to reduce (a liquid or solid) to fine particles or spray or (of a liquid or solid) to be reduced in this way

You've not heard of a perfume atomizer?
edit on 14-7-2012 by _Del_ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


Very cool video. It's fascinating to think about how many "small" things happen like that all around us and we don't see it with our own eyes.



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 06:33 PM
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Great vid and some nice thoughtgiving comments.

Thanks.



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 07:11 PM
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its cool if not a bit sensationalized heading.



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 


why?
i said holy s#%@ when i realised that drops dont just get absorbed,
cant put that in the healine tho

xploder



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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And, terrifying to think about how many "big" things take place near us that we are completely unaware of



edit on 14-7-2012 by jihadoflove because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 





i said holy s#%@


Exactly what I said. Really cool find. I've seen liquid dropped into liquid slowed down, but never knew the drop bounced and then halved, etc...

I love how scientists are like little kids discovering a snail or something. So excited and giddy.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 12:12 AM
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In my opinion the moon is one of those rebounding "drops". In the video the drop that rises from the strike falls back again into the puddle. The moon rose and "hung there", just outside the reach of the earths gravity to pull it back. Dunno...



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 12:21 AM
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Unfortunately they didn't drop the drop of water from different heights, I suspect that different heights would create different endings in the video.



posted on Jul, 15 2012 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by SarnholeOntarable
reply to post by XPLodER
 


Check this out
....
much cooler



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:01 AM
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reply to post by _Del_
 


The scientifc definition is more like:

Physics/Atomic
To reduce to or separate into atoms.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:06 AM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


I love high speed cameras

Brings out the coolness in almost everything!
Thanks for the vid.



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 03:19 AM
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I call CGI, that is clearly fake.



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