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The Case of the Mysterious Melting Canadian Currency...Fact or Myth?

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posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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So you may ask yourself, why is he putting this in Rant? Simple.

If it's true, I'm PO'd to the nth degree and thought I'd save some time.


Y'see...this is what the new Canadian bills are supposed to look like:

But apparently, some folks are finding this is what theirs look like after being exposed to things like a clothes drier, being left in a car (kinda deserve this one for being an idiot) or just behind a heater in the house:

And a bank teller tells us this:
ca.news.yahoo.com...

Brittney Halldorson, a teller at the Interior Savings Credit Union in Kelowna, B.C., said the new $50 and $100 bills are supposed to withstand boiling water but she has seen cases where several of the bills melted. "We have seen it a few times now where there have been either three to four, or five to ten [bills] all melted together."

Another example:

In Cambridge, Ont., Mona Billard returned eight plastic bills in January, after her son stashed his $800 Christmas bonus in a tin can and hid it near a baseboard heater. When he retrieved them the next day to make a deposit, the $100 banknotes had shriveled and melted. Billard exchanged clean bills for the shrunken, unusable ones.

"The leather couch is up against the baseboard heater, it doesn't melt," she told the National Post. "The kids' toys are back there, they don't melt."

But according to the Bank of Canada:

"The Bank has encountered no evidence that polymer bank notes are being affected by heat as has been suggested in recent news reports," she wrote.

Well, what else would we expect them to say?

So what does any good Canadian do with all this? They conduct their own tests of course!

ca.news.yahoo.com...

Charles Shepard of Brandon contends the high-tech bills, if they're cracked, have less strength than toilet paper. Shepard was spurred to test the bills after getting some at his bank. "When the teller counted the money out, right away (I) noticed that this one had a crack or something where it was folded," Shepard told CTV News. When the teller handed him the money, two of the plastic $100s with cracks in them ripped even more.

So Shepard decided to conduct his own little stress test. He placed one of the damaged bills under a can of pop. When he pulled on the other end of the bill, it ripped in half. "It's similar to thin tin foil or plastic food wrap," he said. "You pull on it but as soon as it's got a mark or tear on it, it just peels apart." Shepard said he performed the same test on one of the old paper bills, this time a $50, which also had nicks in it. It withstood the cola-can test. Then he tested pieces of toilet paper, which stayed intact despite being weighed down by three cans. "I don't think the Canadian $100 bill should be weaker than two-ply toilet paper," said Shepard.

I have news for this guy, the $100 bill is about as valuable as toilet paper anyways.
Polymer or not.
And then the response from Bank of Canada on this one:

Bank of Canada spokesman Ted Mieszkalski said it's aware of the issue but it's not a major concern.

Aware of the issue that our money is easily destroyed but it's not a major concern? Maybe not to him!!

So is it true or just another urban legend taking root? I don't know and I'm not rich enough to start testing


But now that I've put this out there, where would a good story be on ATS without it's own conspiracy theory behind it? So I came up with one all on my own and if I find out that I'm correct, watch out!


My theory is that the Govt. has designed these bills with climate change and X-Flares from the sun coming in at increasing rates. Very ingenious actually.

Melt all of our money so that we all end up broke, dependent on welfare and ready to be given shelter in some of the FEMA camps we have been hearing about that are starting to be built in Canada.

That's my theory and I'm sticking to it!


Peace




posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Ive heard the fifties melt together fairly easily....as well they stick together when you count them out so be sure yer only giving the right amount of bills....fifties are the worst ive heard.....qien sabe



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:32 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


ya we recently changed to monopoly money... :shk:

Now it even comes with a window... so the tellers can keep an eye on you while they check if its fake...




posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by stirling
Ive heard the fifties melt together fairly easily....as well they stick together when you count them out so be sure yer only giving the right amount of bills....fifties are the worst ive heard.....qien sabe


Both the 50 and 100 notes are tricky to count as they do stick together.

The other thing I don't like is the clear plastic strip. Press your thumb on it and you get a nice clear print.


But that's another theory...


Peace



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by Akragon
reply to post by jude11
 


ya we recently changed to monopoly money... :shk:

Now it even comes with a window... so the tellers can keep an eye on you while they check if its fake...



While I don't like the plastic money, I still like our colors for different denominations. Easy to count in dim light and much more interesting than that boring US lookalike cash.


Peace



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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The currency is made out of plastic people...what happens when you heat plastic up? Common sense people.


You can wash the bills, you cant tear them or rip them, you can cut them, you cant heat them.



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Yeah thats true the US money is very, very boring to look at, I like all the coloured currency like Canadian and Australian.
However, I have heard recently that in Australia they are talking about going to a digital currency and scrapping all polymer banknotes and coins. I personally am very much against that, why?

Because I feel safe knowing I can withdraw all my cash from the bank into TANGIBLE money, without that what value does digital currency have?? ZERO

Who would want to work for literally nothing?



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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I actually just had one of the 50's in my hand.
They have an awkward feel.. i like the old bills. At least they 'felt' real, These things feel fake as hell, something about these bills is just eerie to me. I mean cmon, plastic?

But i mean.. i guess it could be the least of our worries.. fingerprints hm?
Whats this i hear about the CSIS watchdog being axed?

You neeever know. CSIS is also having their hand in trying to pass the online spying bill. Under no watchdog? fishy. Different topic.

I wish i could afford to test these out, perhaps i will as long as i can get them exchanged



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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Originally posted by CrimsonKapital
reply to post by jude11
 


Yeah thats true the US money is very, very boring to look at, I like all the coloured currency like Canadian and Australian.
However, I have heard recently that in Australia they are talking about going to a digital currency and scrapping all polymer banknotes and coins. I personally am very much against that, why?

Because I feel safe knowing I can withdraw all my cash from the bank into TANGIBLE money, without that what value does digital currency have?? ZERO

Who would want to work for literally nothing?


I feel safer having it turned into gold and silver buried in the ground somewhere.

I don't like the idea of all my money in a building behind a steel vault door and I don't even have a key. Seems silly to me.

Peace



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by misfitofscience
The currency is made out of plastic people...what happens when you heat plastic up? Common sense people.


You can wash the bills, you cant tear them or rip them, you can cut them, you cant heat them.


We all know what happens. What's your point?

My point is very simple. Money that used to be able to go through drying simply becomes useless. And if you read the source links, they can be torn and once that happens, they split like cling wrap.

Doesn't seem like progress to me.

Peace



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by jude11

Originally posted by CrimsonKapital
reply to post by jude11
 


Yeah thats true the US money is very, very boring to look at, I like all the coloured currency like Canadian and Australian.
However, I have heard recently that in Australia they are talking about going to a digital currency and scrapping all polymer banknotes and coins. I personally am very much against that, why?

Because I feel safe knowing I can withdraw all my cash from the bank into TANGIBLE money, without that what value does digital currency have?? ZERO

Who would want to work for literally nothing?


I feel safer having it turned into gold and silver buried in the ground somewhere.

I don't like the idea of all my money in a building behind a steel vault door and I don't even have a key. Seems silly to me.

Peace


True as well, but it is just ridiculous to have a digital currency because it would have ZERO value because its nothing. I only want tangible money because without the bank will completely control a person.



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


TBH we here in Australia use polymer banknotes, and I'm pretty sure we were the first country in the world to do so and I have never heard of melting banknotes?


EDIT: I think the best benefit about polymer banknotes is that they are INCREDIBLY hard to fake meaning criminals cannot print their own money like they do in the US for example.
edit on 13-7-2012 by CrimsonKapital because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by CrimsonKapital
reply to post by jude11
 


TBH we here in Australia use polymer banknotes, and I'm pretty sure we were the first country in the world to do so and I have never heard of melting banknotes?


EDIT: I think the best benefit about polymer banknotes is that they are INCREDIBLY hard to fake meaning criminals cannot print their own money like they do in the US for example.
edit on 13-7-2012 by CrimsonKapital because: (no reason given)


Yeah, as mentioned I don't know if it's true and some say yes while others say no.

The best evidence is the teller coming forward tho.

Peace



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Sounds to me like they don't expect it to be around for very long...a good reason to buy gold & silver instead of IOU notes.

Peace



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 10:42 PM
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Originally posted by BABYBULL24
Sounds to me like they don't expect it to be around for very long...a good reason to buy gold & silver instead of IOU notes.

Peace


Actually, they developed it because it lasts longer than 'conventional' bills, as long as you dont put your wallet on a toaster oven (who does that??), and because they are far more difficult to counterfeit, which prevents inflation.

Gold and Silver buried in your back yard? I wish you all the best in that endeavor.



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by stanguilles7

Gold and Silver buried in your back yard? I wish you all the best in that endeavor.


Actually...



buried in the ground somewhere.


...is the exact quote.

Please don't change the wording on a post as you see fit.

Peace



edit on 15-7-2012 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



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