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Exposing the lies in the Official Story

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posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by psikeyhackr

Originally posted by Varemia

Dude. I don't think the towers were pressurized. We're not talking about elementary physics principles. Elementary physics applies a little differently in real life, since we are not in a vacuum and must account for many other forces and factors.


Tell waypastvne. He brought up negative pressure and Bernoulli effect.

psik


What I was saying is that the elevators were not pressurized, so while the basic effect will be there, it won't be as strong, meaning that there won't much to stop the flow of jet fuel down the elevator, which brings vapor too. Vapor ignites, and heating a relatively small space quickly will cause explosions.




posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK


Sounds like you have fuel injection, not a carburetor.


Two stroke, two cylinder, aspirated carburetor, rotary valve inlet. The only time air can enter the carburetor is when the rotary valve is open.



You can say what you want about air pressure, but you still have the problem that fuel does not explode when ignited in open air.


It's not in open air it is contained inside an elevator shaft. In open air explosions and deflagrations are spherical, expansion force radiates out in all directions. Contained inside the shafts, all of the energy from the expansion force, would be focused on the ends of the shaft.



Fuel will only cause an 'explosion' if it is in an airtight container, where the gasses released can build pressure and rupture the container.



No the container does not have to be air tight. It only needs to restrict and refocus the spherical expansion of gases.

This is the same fuel that will lift a 3000,000 lb. aircraft to 35,000 ft. and propel it at 500 mph.
edit on 18-7-2012 by waypastvne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by Varemia

Originally posted by psikeyhackr

Originally posted by Varemia

Dude. I don't think the towers were pressurized. We're not talking about elementary physics principles. Elementary physics applies a little differently in real life, since we are not in a vacuum and must account for many other forces and factors.


Tell waypastvne. He brought up negative pressure and Bernoulli effect.

psik


What I was saying is that the elevators were not pressurized, so while the basic effect will be there, it won't be as strong, meaning that there won't much to stop the flow of jet fuel down the elevator, which brings vapor too. Vapor ignites, and heating a relatively small space quickly will cause explosions.


Flowing and falling are two different things. The fuel came into the buildings at hundreds of miles per hour. So that SMALL PERCENTAGE that happened to be going in the right direction to reach the elevator shaft would bounce off the walls and splash around, not stop and fall down the center of the shaft. So how many minutes would it take to flow down the walls of the shaft to the lobby and how much would have burned away before flowing 900 feet?

psik



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by waypastvne

Originally posted by psikeyhackr


And a carburetor pulls fluid out of the tube not put it in so your straw man is upside down anyway.


Someone who can't figure out that air will rush in to fill a low pressure, Is literally not smart enough to breath.


Then what did you bring up the Bernoulli effect for?

psik



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by psikeyhackr
 



So that SMALL PERCENTAGE that happened to be going in the right direction to reach the elevator shaft....


Shafts. There was more than one shaft. In fact the core of the buildings was almost nothing but elevator shafts, so basically all the fuel was headed in the right direction. You know there are some nice diagrams of the building in the NIST report - you should give it a read sometime. Might help you understand the situation a litttle better.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by psikeyhackr

Originally posted by waypastvne

Someone who can't figure out that air will rush in to fill a low pressure, Is literally not smart enough to breath.


Then what did you bring up the Bernoulli effect for?

psik


I brought up the subject of Bernoulli effect to answer the stupid truther question " how did jet fuel get in to the elevator shafts", Silly. Try and pay attention, and remember to breath.



Here is the summation again:

The air from the plane passed over the elevator shafts and ducts.

As it passed over, it drew (sucked)* a large amount of air out of the shafts and left a low pressure inside the shafts.

The low pressure drew (sucked)* a large amount of air and jet fuel back into the shafts when it equalised.

The jet fuel ignited..... Mystery solved.



*I added a substitute term (sucked) incase the term drew was too technical for you, or you might think Bernolli was an artist and actually drew a picture of air coming out of the shafts.
edit on 18-7-2012 by waypastvne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 12:59 AM
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Originally posted by waypastvne

Originally posted by psikeyhackr

Originally posted by waypastvne

Someone who can't figure out that air will rush in to fill a low pressure, Is literally not smart enough to breath.


Then what did you bring up the Bernoulli effect for?

psik


I brought up the subject of Bernoulli effect to answer the stupid truther question " how did jet fuel get in to the elevator shafts", Silly. Try and pay attention, and remember to breath.



Here is the summation again:

The air from the plane passed over the elevator shafts and ducts.

As it passed over, it drew (sucked)* a large amount of air out of the shafts and left a low pressure inside the shafts.

The low pressure drew (sucked)* a large amount of air and jet fuel back into the shafts when it equalised.

The jet fuel ignited..... Mystery solved.



*I added a substitute term (sucked) incase the term drew was too technical for you, or you might think Bernolli was an artist and actually drew a picture of air coming out of the shafts.
edit on 18-7-2012 by waypastvne because: (no reason given)


Are you talking about jet fuel in the North Tower? I sure hope you are! I sure hope you can prove to me that there was some. Can you do that? I'm asking.

Please show me the proof you have that there was jet fuel in the North Tower.


Cheers



posted on Jul, 19 2012 @ 01:45 AM
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Originally posted by waypastvne
Here is the summation again:

The air from the plane passed over the elevator shafts and ducts.

As it passed over, it drew (sucked)* a large amount of air out of the shafts and left a low pressure inside the shafts.

The low pressure drew (sucked)* a large amount of air and jet fuel back into the shafts when it equalised.

The jet fuel ignited..... Mystery solved.


That is not a summation, it is a bad assumption. Mystery not solved.

How could the plane have passed over the elevator shaft? Are you claiming the plane ignored the core columns and just flew through them? No mate the plane did not fly over the elevator shafts. It did not suck air out of them.

think man think.

edit on 7/19/2012 by ANOK because: (no reason given)






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