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Biochips implanted in first humans as a 'medical benefit'.

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posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:26 PM
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What is the Biochip implant?
The current, in use, biochip implant system is actually a fairly simple device. Today’s, biochip implant is basically a small (micro) computer chip, inserted under the skin, for identification purposes. The biochip implant system consists of two components; a transponder and a reader or scanner. The transponder is the actual biochip implant. The biochip system is a radio frequency identification (RFID) system, using low-frequency radio signals to communicate between the biochip and reader. The reading range or activation range, between reader and biochip is small, normally between 2 and 12 inches.


"First humans receive biochip implant "Chipping" promoted as medical benefit"
www.iahf.com...



Also a lot of companies want the chip implanted into their employees. - BIG BROTHER could soon be watching from the 'inside.' Several international companies are consulting scientists on ways of developing microchip implants for their workers to measure their timekeeping and whereabouts.


The technology, which has been proven on pets and human volunteers, would enable firms to track staff all around a building or complex. The data could enable them to draw up estimates of workers' efficiency and productivity.

Professor Kevin Warwick of Reading University, a leading cybernetics expert, has been approached by several firms including a leading software company with a British subsidiary and Blackbaud Inc, the American software giant.

Warwick hit the headlines last summer when he had a silicon chip transponder surgically implanted in his forearm. He was subsequently able to show how a computer could monitor every move he made using detectors that were scattered around the building in which he worked.

In his experiment, Warwick showed how the system could also benefit workers by programming it to switch on lights, computers and heating systems as he entered a room - and turning them off when he left.

The technology is likely to have a strong appeal to companies with high labour costs, for which small increases in staff productivity can have a big impact on profits. It is also relatively cheap - just a few pounds for each person, according to Warwick.

"For a business the potential is obvious," he said. "You can tell when people clock into work and when they leave the building. You would know at all times exactly where they were and who they were with."

Warwick admits that people will be "shocked" by the idea of companies asking their employees to have such implants. He said: "It is pushing at the limits of what society will accept but it is not such a big deal. Many employees already carry swipecards. I think this is just a step on from that."

His research follows earlier experiments by companies such as the telecommunications firm AT&T that showed how smart cards carried by staff could be programmed to relay a worker's position back to a central computer. AT&T Laboratories in Cambridge has been working on its "smart badges" for two years. They use ultrasound to tell the main computer exactly where the wearer is, allowing their desktop computers and phone calls to "follow" them around the building.

The company has, however, stopped short of suggesting staff should have devices inserted into their bodies.

The first practical application of such technology is, however, not in humans but in pets. Under the government's new "passports for pets" scheme, which replaces the quarantine system from 2001, dogs will have a microchip implanted beneath their skin to identify who they belong to.

Representatives from police forces in Britain and the United States have also expressed interest in the implant technology, according to Warwick.

He believes that submitting to an implant could be made a condition, for example, of being granted a gun licence.




posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:30 PM
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I would get one. Seems like a better version of an ID bracelet in case of emergencies. Not really worried about my privacy either.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:31 PM
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F%^k that I wont work there and tell them to go to hell,

2nd



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by ProtectedWitness
 


It really is sad to hear an American say that, I hope you were being sarcastic?



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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It's a brilliant idea. In fact, I'm going to half a dozen chips implanted just to f*ck with their system.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:39 PM
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My pets have them. If they ever get lost, they will be returned to me instead of being put down because of their ID chips. If the government wants to know where we are at, they can access our phones to do that. But I don't really have any worries since I don't break any laws.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by ProtectedWitness
 


Yeah, go ahead and give away your freedom for some imagined security. If you want to be chipped like cattle, be my guest, but I want nothing to do with it.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by FissionSurplus
 


What freedom would I be giving away?

As for imaginative security... imagine getting into a bad car accident, and the EMT having the ability to scan your chip for Blood Type, allergies, emergency contact, or any other information that may save your life.
edit on 12-7-2012 by ProtectedWitness because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by ProtectedWitness
My pets have them. If they ever get lost, they will be returned to me instead of being put down because of their ID chips. If the government wants to know where we are at, they can access our phones to do that. But I don't really have any worries since I don't break any laws.


Maybe so, but someone could clone your ID and break a few laws for you, using your identity. But I guess you'd be fine with that, as you seem to like the idea of being treated like a suspect.


What freedom would I be giving away?

The freedom to not be treated like a suspect. The freedom to withhold your identity from some random bloke who pretends to have authority, or abuses his/her position. The freedom not to be tracked.
edit on 12-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by ProtectedWitness
 


If you have to ask that question, you're already a lost cause.


Amendment IV (Privacy of the Person and Possessions) The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment IX (More General Protection for Privacy?) The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Liberty Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment No State shall... deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.


law2.umkc.edu...

Riddle me this: Why would you WANT to be chipped and tracked 24/7??



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by jNormal
 



Several international companies are consulting scientists on ways of developing microchip implants for their workers to measure their timekeeping and whereabouts.


Illegal, against the constitution, invasion of privacy and will not be allowed.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:58 PM
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As for imaginative security... imagine getting into a bad car accident, and the EMT having the ability to scan your chip for Blood Type, allergies, emergency contact, or any other information that may save your life.
reply to post by ProtectedWitness
 

I would rather take my chances. The "bad car accident" scenario has been done to death on the internet as an excuse for this RFID crap.

Like I said, if you don't mind being chipped like a steer, then go for it. But don't expect the rest of us to moo and follow along with it.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:03 PM
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So once these chips are given the signal to produce a frequency that is detrimental to the human cell, its all over for the folks with chips.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by jNormal
 


I think we need to take a look at (PositiveID Corporation) and the technology developed to help diabetics; (The GlucoChip).

Link: www.positiveidcorp.com...



edit on 12-7-2012 by caladonea because: add more



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by FissionSurplus
reply to post by ProtectedWitness
 


If you have to ask that question, you're already a lost cause.


Amendment IV (Privacy of the Person and Possessions) The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment IX (More General Protection for Privacy?) The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Liberty Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment No State shall... deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.


law2.umkc.edu...

Riddle me this: Why would you WANT to be chipped and tracked 24/7??


Amendment IV: Nothing is being discussed about search and seizures. Dont know why that is relevant to the conversation.

Amendment IX: You still haven't said what rights will be denied or disparaged against.

14 Amendment: I dont see anything mentioned about depriving life, liberty, or property at all. Please point this out in the article above please.

These are private companies who are discussing the possibility of application, not the government. If you are working at a company, and don't want the implant, than don't work there. You won't be forced.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:12 PM
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These are private companies who are discussing the possibility of application, not the government. If you are working at a company, and don't want the implant, than don't work there. You won't be forced.


So why the need to reassure us you're a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide?

Of course, the companies wouldn't force their employees to receive the chip. They'd likely give them a free choice between getting chipped or getting sacked.
edit on 12-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by FissionSurplus



As for imaginative security... imagine getting into a bad car accident, and the EMT having the ability to scan your chip for Blood Type, allergies, emergency contact, or any other information that may save your life.
reply to post by ProtectedWitness
 

I would rather take my chances. The "bad car accident" scenario has been done to death on the internet as an excuse for this RFID crap.

Like I said, if you don't mind being chipped like a steer, then go for it. But don't expect the rest of us to moo and follow along with it.


If the government wanted you to have the chip, they have the ability to make you get a chip. They could create a tax (just like obamacare) for those who don't have a chip, and make the tax outrageous enough that you are forced into submission. If you think you can get around this by growing your own food, they can just reassess the taxes on your individual land and raise it to an amount that you can no longer afford, and then evict you.

They have several tools at their dispose that will force you to comply. But they don't, because contrary to popular belief, they aren't out to get you.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by XeroOne

These are private companies who are discussing the possibility of application, not the government. If you are working at a company, and don't want the implant, than don't work there. You won't be forced.


So why the need to reassure us you're a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide?

Of course, the companies wouldn't force their employees to receive the chip. They'd likely give them a free choice between getting chipped or getting sacked.
edit on 12-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)


Because I'm not breaking any laws or rules at work, so I'm not afraid of my company monitoring me while I'm on their property and payroll.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:18 PM
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Given this works being done in the UK it shows that the American legal system is probably a bit tougher or hasn't had some legal challenge on a point of law that the UK law has so its easier to use the confirmed law in one country than try and work out the possible challenges and also the costs of testing it in another country



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by ProtectedWitness

Originally posted by XeroOne

These are private companies who are discussing the possibility of application, not the government. If you are working at a company, and don't want the implant, than don't work there. You won't be forced.


So why the need to reassure us you're a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide?

Of course, the companies wouldn't force their employees to receive the chip. They'd likely give them a free choice between getting chipped or getting sacked.
edit on 12-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)


Because I'm not breaking any laws or rules at work, so I'm not afraid of my company monitoring me while I'm on their property and payroll.


But don't you think that would shift the burden of proof somewhat? Essentially you're condoning the concept of getting chipped to prove your innocence, instead of them proving your guilt beyond reasonable doubt? You're certainly not the winner in that scenario.

Besides, I already made the point that someone could potentially clone your chip and implicate you in a very serious crime.



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