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Fruitless Michigan 2012

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posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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Our family has owned fruit orchards for over 50 years in Michigan, and never have we seen a fruitless year due to weather, but this year is different.

Many people that live in Michigan know we had an extremely warm winter coupled with a very warm March. Unfortunately the warm month of March forced all the fruit trees in Michigan to blossom early.

Now here is the kicker, the blossoms did not all freeze, in fact most of them were OK, but what did happen was when the blossoms where in full bloom it was too cold for the bees to leave their hive, so basically no pollination occurred this year.

I have not taken pics, but I will update within the next week or so, usually I work our orchard of 1500+ trees this time of year, but it's almost pointless now. I will spray copper sulfate as usual, but not the frequency since there is no fruit.

Here is a test. Michigan people on ATS, if you have a fruit tree in your yard go out and take a look and see if there is fruit on it this year.

For the commercial farmers in Michigan with Insurance they will make out OK, and ship in apples from the Carolina's and Washington state, but many of the small guys who make a living off of their organic farms are going to have a rough time this year.

The farm reports in Michigan for fruit growers are very bad, I almost do not want to read our Michigan farmers news letters.

It's not just apples, pears, plums, grapes, and Black Cherries have been affected too.

Some links for everyone.

voices.yahoo.com...

www.mlive.com...

edit on 12-7-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:33 AM
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perhaps it is time for the nations of the world to stop focusing on the technology of war.

Switch gears to sustainable indoor food production, large hydroponic warehouses, that can produce fish (via aquaponics) and fruits and vegetables.

Powered by solar (since there seems to be an over abundance of sunny days right now)

Could probably build a huge warehouse with the price of each drone we build, probably a few hundred with each fighter jet...

Solve many problems right there...

But you know that might actually make sense, and we cant have that.

If we are going to continue to ignore the problem we may find the next extinct species we kill off is our selves.
edit on 12-7-2012 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:40 AM
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reply to post by benrl
 


Benrl,

What shook me to the core was that not only did the weather affect the fruit production, but when I saw all of my hives dormant during full bloom was "F me" this is going to be really really bad.

I am very humbled this year.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:51 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


We will all have to adapt to the changes or we will die.

The death of the bees has been coming forever, you are catching a glimpse of the future for all crops.

We can build a drone to blow up targets thousands of miles away. Surely we could create pollinization drones, it would take time but could be done.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 04:05 AM
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GMO bee's to like warm weather



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 04:09 AM
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Originally posted by benrl
reply to post by Realtruth
 


The death of the bees has been coming forever, you are catching a glimpse of the future for all crops.

We can build a drone to blow up targets thousands of miles away. Surely we could create pollinization drones, it would take time but could be done.


I am a certified bee keeper in Michigan and have posted threads years ago on ATS, in regards to the bee die off. I have kept up with Michigan State experts and their extension service actually comes out to our farm to check on our crops, bees, etc.

I can tell you for almost certain that the bee die off has to do with chemicals, GMO crops and toxic pesticides that are sprayed by brainwashed farmers. At our orchard we are organic pesticides only, that adhere to organic farming and we never spray when the bees are pollinating.

And I hope we never have to come to producing a pollination drone or we are doomed.


I think it's time to put our world differences aside and wake up as an entire world, or like you say we are in big trouble if we don't.


Peace out,

RT
edit on 12-7-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 05:48 AM
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Very interesting thread.

I remember seeing a pbs show about japanese beekeepers/farmers having to pollinate their own trees, flower by flower. Can't remember what it was called though...



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 05:57 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


I am curious, do you keep your own bee hives?



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 06:07 AM
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Thanks for the report Realtruth, flagged and starred. I'll be watching your posts. PS I also put you on my friends list.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 06:31 AM
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Although tragic and disconcerting that weather and timing made for a bad apple season for Michigan... to have gone 50 years with this being the first bad season is really remarkable.

Here in NC, you can typically expect 3 out of 4 good seasons. And the joke among most of the farmers is that it takes 3 years to make up for the bad year, trouble is... when you finally get caught up... it is time for another bad year.

Diversity in NC is the name of the game... this year, I have the best apple crop ever... but no peaches. Last year it was opposite... best peach season ever. I don't grow these commercially... just for home use... never the less my trees are full of the prettiest little red and green streaked apples.

This is nothing new here either. Most people that seriously garden with the intent of putting up the harvest... canning, freezing, dehydrating... always grow extra... "because next year you might get nothing."

The really troubling aspect is not the weather as much as the dwindling bee population. That is the potential disaster that too many people are not aware of. A decining bee population is potentially as devestating as any nuclear exchange...

Good luck and keep track...after a couple more seasons, you should be able to see a definite pattern... hopefully next year will be better.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 08:26 AM
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Originally posted by OpinionatedB
reply to post by Realtruth
 


I am curious, do you keep your own bee hives?


Yes currently we have 25 hives all mostly Italian breed too.

I think bees are one of the most fascinate creatures on this planet. Think about it they fly, they pollinate, they make their own food internally from nectar they collect, they produce wax to help build their home and store their food and the list goes on.




Originally posted by 1825114
Very interesting thread.

I remember seeing a pbs show about japanese beekeepers/farmers having to pollinate their own trees, flower by flower. Can't remember what it was called though...


It's called having patience and over 3 billion people available.


Seriously though it's call mechanical pollination and I hope we never have to do it here in the USA.
edit on 12-7-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 08:37 AM
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Originally posted by AlreadyGone

The really troubling aspect is not the weather as much as the dwindling bee population. That is the potential disaster that too many people are not aware of. A decining bee population is potentially as devestating as any nuclear exchange...

Good luck and keep track...after a couple more seasons, you should be able to see a definite pattern... hopefully next year will be better.


Overall I would have said you are correct about the bee problem because without them we are all dead.

But Michigan farmer and resident have really taken note about extremely high temperatures this year we broke records almost every month this year, so I think as a world we need to take note because what happened here in Michigan may happen everywhere else soon. I hope note, but my gut tells me we are in for some rough years ahead worldwide.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 08:42 AM
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Originally posted by MichiganSwampBuck
Thanks for the report Realtruth, flagged and starred. I'll be watching your posts. PS I also put you on my friends list.




Looks like your from the Manistee area can you confirm another anomaly I was just made aware of?

I am also an avid fishermen and a fanatical fishing friend of mine just left to yesterday, because he said the salmon were running up the Manistee River 2 months early. Now typically I would call it BS, but this particular friend doesn't cry wolf, nor travel hours for nothing.

He is also heading to Sault Ste. Marie for the early Salmon run there too.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:19 PM
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I have a HUGE walnut tree in my back yard. Every other year the nuts form and eventually fall. They seem to be growing a tad bit early and are almost half-sized. I have found a few on the ground while mowing, but that was most likely due to the weather as of late. I do not recall seeing them this early but then again I probably was not paying attention.
edit on 12-7-2012 by ConspiracyBuff because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:46 PM
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It is bad here in Mid MI. My neighbor has several apple trees, a couple pears and a couple peach. There is nothing on any of them. We did get a late hard frost, I never got any lilacs on my bushes. It really bums me out because he always shares with me and I can everything. This year nothing. The other neighbor has cherry trees and they are bare as well.
Last year, the huge, well know cider mill right by me was selling a gallon of cider for 6.00 a gallon, when they had a bumper crop. I wonder how bad it will be this year?
Luckily I still have some of our homemade in the freezer!

I haven't checked my English walnut trees. Have to do that tonight.
edit on 12-7-2012 by chiefsmom because: afterthought



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by chiefsmom

Last year, the huge, well know cider mill right by me was selling a gallon of cider for 6.00 a gallon, when they had a bumper crop. I wonder how bad it will be this year?
Luckily I still have some of our homemade in the freezer!


We have a full scale cider mill as well and this year we'll only be pressing for ourselves if we can scrounge enough for a couple of pressings, but I doubt it very much.

To give people an idea how many trees it takes for a full pressings it takes two semi-dwarf trees that produces about 6 to 10 bushels each, and we extract about 3 to 6 gallons per bushel, so in a full pressing 48 to 120 gallons a pressing. This also depends on how many racks we stack on the press.

I wouldn't worry to much because most of the huge commercial apple orchards will import apples, very cheap from all over the USA which wasn't hit hard at all, so the price should be around the same, because they don't want to loose their customers, and their crop insurance money will cover all the shipping costs.

Sometimes Michigan farmers actually can buy apples cheaper than growing them.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


Yeah, I know they will by them. I'm just bummed because I can't make it myself or the applesauce this year!

Are you in northern MI?



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by benrl
 


"We can build a drone to blow up targets thousands of miles away. Surely we could create pollinization drones, it would take time but could be done."
I've been around this site for some 5 years. I've been coming here for for the chance to read something interesting. I'm occasionally rewarded with the bits n pieces to puzzles past and present. Interesting.
Those two sentences. They were this weeks prize.
Thank you.



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 02:49 AM
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reply to post by dondrews
 





"We can build a drone to blow up targets thousands of miles away. Surely we could create pollinization drones, it would take time but could be done." I've been around this site for some 5 years. I've been coming here for for the chance to read something interesting. I'm occasionally rewarded with the bits n pieces to puzzles past and present. Interesting. Those two sentences. They were this weeks prize. Thank you.


My vision involves thousands of computer synchronized and computer controlled quadcopters with dusters or toilet brushes attached to the bottom flying overthe the tops of crops gently spread pollen



we can do it for a light show, why not for crops.



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 02:37 PM
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There is very little fruit that got pollinated in early spring here in the UP either. My brothers cherry has one tenth of the cherries it had last year. If the tree wasn't full of little moths this spring he said he probably wouldn't have cherries at all. I gotta go pick some for freezing this weekend before the birds get them all..



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