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Scientists Prove Ancient Alien Cauldrons in Siberia are Real

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posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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1 wonders was there any activity here within the last month.




posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


So is this what shot down DA14 2012?



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 07:30 PM
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Originally posted by LordGoofus
Fascinating story but I highly doubt it has any merit.. those swamps looked like they were pretty easy to see from the air, it wouldn't be particularly hard to find them again and bring some proper equipment + pumps to escavate one of the swamps to see what's down there. Also very odd that they knew they were looking for metallica objects but don't appear to have taken any sort of metal detector, radar. I would've certainly done alot more than poke it with a stick to see what happens...


You're right. It wouldn't be that hard to do. But the fact is that it's probably not gonna happen. Doing such requires both funding and permission and nobody in Russia seems to have both of those when it comes to this place. I honestly think that there certainly should be an excavation as it quite feasible to do but I have no say in this matter and I'm pretty sure that if I suggested it to the Russian authorities they'd veto the idea.

I actually saw another video where they were using metal detectors and determined that there were indeed large metallic objects buried there. No I don't believe in Ancient Aliens, UFOs, or any of that nonsense but clearly the legends about these cauldrons being out there in the Siberian wilderness are TRUE. As to what they are, who(or what)put them there, and what there purpose is currently remains a mystery.
edit on 21-5-2013 by YogSohoth because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by StargateSG7
reply to post by Mythkiller
 


Any observers or explorers had better be very careful
as MOST of what has been shown here are examples
of highly radioactive cold war-era radio-isotope power generators.

And the clue as what the found items are is the mention of
cauldron shapes and shiny spheres which indicate to me
that they are cold-war era sensors with a combined power generator
used to detect low altitude and/or air-burst nuclear detonations.

The X-rays, gamma and Alpha/Beta particles
given off by a nuclear detonation would be collected
and sensed using simple laws of physics as those particles
interacted with and caused specific anomalies within the
metallic dish-like and sphere-like collectors.

A built-in low-frequency/long range over-the-horizon radio transmitter
would send signals back to a receiving unit after a specific time
delay after detonation and since these detonation detectors are fully
Faraday caged, they are immune to EMP and being mostly sub-surface,
any low-altitude or surface nuclear detonation would cause the upper
ground layers to fuse into a silica glass thus futher protecting the buried
devices from damage.




This is certainly a plausible explanation, but if it were true you can bet your bottom dollar that if that were the case this area would be a restricted zone and no camera crews would be allowed to film there.

But HOW the hell can you transmit signals from a device that barely pokes out of the ground and has no antenna? There certainly were(and still are) radiation sensors in Russia that are operated by the military but they are always positioned at or very near missile silos as part of the launch-on-warning system. US ICBM bases also have hardened radiation detectors connected to missile control modules by buried cables with extensive hardening. Putting an installation like that in a place like that is impractical because in the summertime the ground is far too soggy/unstable and heavy structures tend to sink down where they wouldn't be able to detect atmospheric radiation.
edit on 21-5-2013 by YogSohoth because: corrections



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 11:58 AM
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I can think of an even better explanation as to why there has been no excavation of this site other than the cost issue: RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION.

There were 11 non-military subterranean nuclear tests carried out in and near the Vilyuy river basin during the cold war era. One of these underground explosions breached the surface and distributed fallout in the mining towns several hundred miles to the east. The Soviet government of course denied this and claimed falsely that radiation levels were "normal", but in the 90s after the dissolution of the USSR foreign scientists traveled there and measured radiation levels...They were ABOVE normal. So anyone venturing into this region will face the very real hazard of contracting radiation sickness. AFAIC, that's a pretty damn good reason not to disturb the ground where these things are.I know someone in Yakutia with the right connections to arrange a trip out to the "Valley of Death", but it is not cheap! Better bring a Geiger counter and a metal detector along with plenty of bottled water and provisions. To imply that if there was something there, then they would excavate is willfully ignorant of scientific facts.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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so today we have heavy lift helicopters which could bring into that area, generators, waterpumps, small backhoes, protective suits, Geiger counters, soil and air sampling equipment, portable living units with survival gear and rations....and yet.....nobody in the entire world wants to go there....if not a foreign person, isn't there a Russian millionaire or billionaire who has some sort of adventurous nature?



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by jimmyx
so today we have heavy lift helicopters which could bring into that area, generators, waterpumps, small backhoes, protective suits, Geiger counters, soil and air sampling equipment, portable living units with survival gear and rations....and yet.....nobody in the entire world wants to go there....if not a foreign person, isn't there a Russian millionaire or billionaire who has some sort of adventurous nature?



What makes you think that the Kremlin, or the regional government of Yakutia, is going to let them excavate there? This ain't the 90s anymore. You can just dig anywhere you want in that country, you will need to get permission. And furthermore, radiation protective suits and Geiger counters will not and I repeat NOT prevent underground radioactivity from entering the air, soil, and water(which is plentiful there since much of that part of Siberia is swampy in the summer time)and harming people who live and work nearby in those mining towns.

I actually think Russia has learned her lesson about being careless with nuclear energy and nuclear explosives. So in short, Putin and his government will not allow excavation. Radiation tends to scare people, and with good reason.



posted on Dec, 29 2013 @ 01:04 AM
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Just a thought, if indeed these metal cauldrons exist.

It's possible these aren't seperate structures, but of one massive structure completely buried underground. It rises up now and then and these eyelids or cauldrons pop up. If they're all about 2 to 3 ft under water.

A nuclear submarine or facility or something that ran aground where more water once was.


edit on 29-12-2013 by violet because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-12-2013 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2013 @ 02:08 AM
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reply to post by Mythkiller
 


I say we at ATS launch our own expedition. I will go if ATS will sponser.
Who's with me ! Cause I damn sure won't go into no valley of death by myself.
edit on 29-12-2013 by randyvs because: (no reason given)





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