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The Bread From Walmart.....

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posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash

Originally posted by Infi8nity
All ways look at ingredients and NEVER trust big corporations they put all kinds of crap in their food to save money.
Google agenda 21 and you will see the reason for this poison.


It's nearly impossible to look at ingredients when they lie about things so often.
And who actually knows what the real world meaning of all of those scientific chemical names are on the ingredients list are anyway? (We can Google those words however).

And how does it "save them money$"?

Wouldn't adding a bunch of things to something increase the cost?
Unless those additives can cut costs elsewhere I suppose...


It costs money to the manufacturer for stores to ship back spoiled product and for the company to dispose. Double shipping costs and disposal fees as well as paying for people to handle the spoiled product.




posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 01:55 PM
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I got myself a bread machine.
I put in all the ingredients before going to bed.
And I got fresh bread in the morning.

As a plus the whole house smells like freshly baked bread.
It's awesome.

I use the recipes i find online.
And usually add more sugar and butter to make them richer.

Easter bread is a nice bread to make.
Toss in a few raisins and some cinnamon for extra yumminess.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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That Mcdonald's burger still doesn't do anything for me.

I can bake bread with no preservatives in it at all, and if I dry it, it will keep just perfect.
If you dry any bread out, the mold doesn't have any water to grow with.
That's just basic food preservation - drying. That McDonald's burger and fries are DRIED. They dried in the car.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by ManFromEurope
 


Well I make my own beer and watch closely what I put in it.

So at least my beer is safe!




posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 02:41 PM
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I have most of a loaf of Experiment Bread that has been sitting around at room temperature for at least five years now. STILL no mold on it. It's Grant's Farm Stone-Ground Wheat, fairly high-end stuff, guaranteed to have no GMO, and not a store brand (got it at HEB). I think it'll outlast the earth... but I don't know what conclusion to draw from it. I mean, sugar can sit around unrefrigerated for decades without going bad, too (beet sugar, of course, since nowadays they make sugar from beets and mostly use sugar cane to make ethanol), and it has no preservatives that I know of. Very spooky.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by MrWendal
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


The reason why the bread was not moldy is because of the preservatives added to the bread. It is added to much of the food we buy today.


Yes, that and the fact that all food stuffs in the USA are radiated, even organic foods, because it's the law.
-----------------

I feel bad for people who spend so much more for organic, when they believe that putting the word on products makes the food safer and well..organic.
Research the truth about organic foods.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by The Vagabond
Squishy fruit textures I've never seen before that still hadn't spoiled for example- very distinct in the strawberries. The only exception seems to be the milk- it always goes bad before the date- but that could just be the fridge setting I suppose.


I've noticed this in the fruit too lately [for quite awhile now really]. For instance, I set my store bought tomatoes aside to allow then to ripen, and whenever I get to them to slice for sandwich or for salad, though they appear to be red & ripe.. the skins are tough with a strange texture.
The other day I was cleaning my fresh strawberries and they felt slightly rubbery [they were also tough], and I had never had a rubbery tough strawberry before this.

For the first time in yrs I've been having milk go bad before it's ex.date. My fiance is disgusted by the smell or taste of spoiled milk. It doesn't bother me so much though I don't drink milk, but I do discard it..this time it smelled like chemicals, and not at all like sour milk, as I was pouring it down the drain. Strong to the nostrils.

Definitely something strange going on with store bought foods.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by artnut
 


Sure but it wont taste the same as fresh. Frozen is not fresh.

This reminds me of the Hardees commercial where they talk about their competitors biscuts being frozen.
The girl from the competition says "Yes we bake them fresh in our factory and flash freeze them to ship them to you."
edit on 11-7-2012 by karen61057 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by WeRpeons
 


Its the US govt telling us that we should eat more carbs. Eat oats, eat wheat, eat what we feed the cattle to make them fat because we tell you it will make you thin. Too many carbs, too much sugar is what is causing the obesity problem and type ii diabetes too.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by TinkerHaus
 


Lol yes it can be a work out. I have to admit that I make a lot more bread now that I have a stand mixer than when I had to knead by hand.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


All Cheaper bread is made by the better bread companys on the same line at the same time maybe different recipes, all of it baked at the same place for walmart, kroger, randals, safeway, whoever... Bimbo or Mrs Bairds bread bakes for everystore within 500 miles of its bakery. The fresh bread to the furthest store is less then 10 hrs after baking... Just a thought!



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Hey we have one of the weather predicting doors too LOL. Ok so just bionic bread I guess. The bread I bake only lasts a day and then it gets too hard. Then I put it in the food processor and make bread crumbs. But mostly it doesnt last a day because we eat it up.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by Thought Provoker
 

Sugar is a preservative. It is a natural preservative and has been used as such for centuries. Sugar and salt were the first preservatives and they are still used today to cure meats.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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I cannot believe how many users of this site shop at WALMART!!!!!!!
second



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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Originally posted by RobinB022

Originally posted by The Vagabond
Squishy fruit textures I've never seen before that still hadn't spoiled for example- very distinct in the strawberries. The only exception seems to be the milk- it always goes bad before the date- but that could just be the fridge setting I suppose.


I've noticed this in the fruit too lately [for quite awhile now really]. For instance, I set my store bought tomatoes aside to allow then to ripen, and whenever I get to them to slice for sandwich or for salad, though they appear to be red & ripe.. the skins are tough with a strange texture.
The other day I was cleaning my fresh strawberries and they felt slightly rubbery [they were also tough], and I had never had a rubbery tough strawberry before this.

For the first time in yrs I've been having milk go bad before it's ex.date. My fiance is disgusted by the smell or taste of spoiled milk. It doesn't bother me so much though I don't drink milk, but I do discard it..this time it smelled like chemicals, and not at all like sour milk, as I was pouring it down the drain. Strong to the nostrils.

Definitely something strange going on with store bought foods.

Re the tomatos. They are breeding the tomatoes with tougher skin so they can ship without bruising. Seek out some heriloom tomatoe seeds and grow your own. The difference in the older varieties is amazing. Tender and sweet but seedy. The "new" tomatoes are beautiful to look at and have less seeds but lack taste and the texture is, well, tough.
I still laugh because I buy food and in a day or two its gone but its not gone bad its been eaten. I guess I shop differently. I go grocery shopping every other day so nothing is more than a day or two old at my house anyway. Well except for staple items like sugar and flour or coffee.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by UdonNiedtuno
 


I know LOL. Me either.
I guess it truly is Americas supermarket.
I do like that some are mentioning brands from other countries that I am not famaliar with. It makes the world a little smaller for me. Like we are all neighbors and can shop at the same stores.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 08:30 PM
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Eh, okay, I'm a bit skeptic and I haven't noticed this. So, I'll buy a loaf of bread and see how long it takes to mold.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 08:56 PM
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Hello Erik,

I must say my first thought was everyone baking bread as their avatar - silly, I know, but a Grey and a Viking (among others) baking bread together just caught my funny bone...
Sorry - it's been a long day...

On a serious note - here is a great blog post about the ingredients used in commercial bread - scary and illuminating...

Yum!!! Fooducate Blog - Bread Ingredients

I used to bake bread all the time, until my child was diagnosed with autism and we went to a gluten-free/casein-free diet (casein is dairy protein). Then I discovered I couldn't eat gluten without my joints aching - it was a sad day when I could no longer pretend wheat was ok. My favorite bread to make was a simple whole wheat loaf with 1/2 the flour as stone ground ww and the other half with ww pastry flour. I used honey, but no milk. We used to make flat breads too, pita and various varieties of Indian breads (like poori - my favorite).

Blessings on your baking!
peace,
AB



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 09:23 PM
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That story scared me a bit. If they are able to chemically alter bread and keep it "fresh" that long, what is it doing to your innards? Not sure I want to know. I might have to look into some bread brands that are natural and have no preservatives, or start going to an old-timey bakery if I can find one.

Speaking of old-time bakeries, my uncle used to operate an authentic Italian bakery when I was around 10-12 years of age. He operated it for the aging owner, an authentic Italian. The place had a coal-fired brick oven in the walkout basement level. This thing had to be 15 or 20 feet deep and 6 or 8 feet wide - it was huge. My uncle would put the dough in proofing racks, then feed them into the brick oven a few loaves at a time on a wooden paddle with a ridiculously long handle. When the oven was full, it wouldn't be too long before he had to start taking the first loaves out the other end (doors on both ends of the oven). It was the best bread I've ever had, hands down. They would sell out every day. On weekends us kids would help out with donuts - we'd fill them with jelly or custard after my uncle made them. They'd sell out, too. Great memories. Too bad there's nothing like that around any more to give kids those same kinds of memories.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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Walmart bread lasts a long time, it's gotta have something in it. It's been that way for many years now. I bake my own bread in the winter months, I developed a recipe with studies from the net. Some local bakeries bread only lasts three days unless refrigerated. We like to buy that if we can. I read research from Finland. A little light whole grain Rye flour in bread helps with some diabetics. It only takes a little, an eighth cup per loaf, to do this. I use organic at 1.09 per lb to make sure no preservation processes interfere with it. A little whole grain Barley flour adds taste. The commercial bread flour is a mix but isn't whole grain rye flour which is needed.





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