The Bread From Walmart.....

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posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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I've been baking fresh bread at home for years now, and have a lot of fun with it.

Have to get it eatten however as after about a week or so it will start to mold.

Store bought "sandwich bread" that many of us buy will do that too I've found in about the same time or longer.

However, over the last few months that seems to have changed.

Three years ago I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabeties and since then I've been keeping a very careful eye on what I eat. And since coming here to ATS and reading the forum, that has trippled for me.

I have a large wooden bread box that we keep sandwich bread in. Many in my family have a tendency to leave the heels in the bag and in the bread box, or the heels and a couple of slices, and the bread box will start to get filled up with these "left over" bread.

A couple of months ago, I was cleaning the bread box out, and toss out the moldy left over bread, many as hard as a rock of course.
But that time I noticed something. None of it was moldy. Or very hard from going stale. This was all the the different breads: white, wheat and whole wheat. All Walmart's store brand.

I shrugged it off then thinking that I was not remembering how long those left overs were in there.

However, this time, I kept track. I let the left overs pile up in there. One of them was wheat with 5 slices and the heels. Today marked the 7th week for that one.

It was soft, no mold, and smelled just as fresh as the day I opened it almot 2 months ago.


The rest of the white bread, mostly heels, were the same: soft and no mold at all......

Kind of freaking me out since we've been eating this. I'm seriously thinking of just making our bread and not buying any store bought again. Bit of work though since my wife and kids eat a lot of bread.




posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:08 PM
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Could we get one of your favorite recipes for a good healthy bread that could be used for sandwiches? My family LOVES bread!



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:09 PM
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I noticed the same with a ready made fruit salad from morrisons. I'd got it ready to eat but then got called out. I returned 7 days later to find it still looked just the same. Intrigued by this I put it to one side to see what would happen. A month later it still looked the same.

I suspect the fruit had been radiated, dont know if they do that to bread though. I only eat organic now.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


I noticed this about a year ago - not just walmart bread, but all types - Kwiktrip bread, "expensive" brands from Walmart - We don't eat a lot of bread, so when I'd go get a piece, I'd think "this bread has been here for weeks" and I'd look for mold, and the bread was still soft, and I know it's weeks......old. Makes me not want to eat any boughten bread at all. It's just not right.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:16 PM
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When I moved in with some family, walmart bread is what they choose. I honestly can say I dont eat bread no more for the fact it comes from walmrt, I meaning the loaf bread. Theirs a taste to it that makes in thought makes me itch. The loaves here last a month I would say. definitely unnormal but never molds, just becomes crusty.

nice thread.
I
I would go back to bread making or find a smaller store that sells, don't trust it imo.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


The local Wal-Mart bread is basically Sunbeam/Waldensian Bakeries/Sara Lee Group. Baked in the same factory just packaged in different bags. Most of the "Store Brand" bread in any grocery store comes from the same place. In your local area it could be another bakery contracted.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Hmmm... People ingesting bread into their system that does not decay.
This may be how the Zombie Apocalypse starts


Seriously, bread that does not decay shouldnot be eaten. In fact anything from Walmart should not be eaten!



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by iLoGiCViZiOnS
 


Here is a wheat recipe that I use:


1 cup warm water
1 tablespoon milk, 2%
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 package of active dry yeast

1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a large mixing bowl.

2. Add flours and yeast, and knead until dough is smooth and elastic. Put dough in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover with a clean towel and let rise until doubled, about 40 minutes.

3. Punch dough down; knead for a few minutes until smooth and then form into a loaf. Place in greased loaf pan and cover. Let rise in a warm place until almost doubled in size, about 30 minutes.

4. Bake at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes.

5. Remove bread from oven and allow to rest in pan for a few minutes. Remove to a wire rack and cover with a cloth.




edit on 10-7-2012 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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I wonder how many billions of people throughout history have complained about spoiled food. I bet they begged and begged for ways to make food last longer.

Bam, 21 century where food no longer spoils.... people complain.

Not saying the food is good or bad, just making a point.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:45 PM
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I wondered what was up when I went to walmart the other day and there was this guy outside screaming "Its people! Walmart bread is people!"



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:46 PM
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Originally posted by MeesterB
I wonder how many billions of people throughout history have complained about spoiled food. I bet they begged and begged for ways to make food last longer.

Bam, 21 century where food no longer spoils.... people complain.

Not saying the food is good or bad, just making a point.



I like cheeze and have never complained that it is basically spoiled milk.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by Numbers33four
 


See...its starting.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Wife mentioned the same thing about a local area chain market 3-4 days ago... We also had bought store baked rolls and they got accidentally tucked away. The mold on them was white. Not the light green we are all used to.

Windhelm over



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 07:58 PM
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I buy my bread at Aldi they have been making it without high fructose corn syrup. I find that is keeps much longer in the refrigerator than in a bread box, stays moist longer and no mold.

The opening post reminded me of a story my ex told me that he heard from a guy at work. This guy had found a yogurt cup in his office desk drawer that he had long forgotten about (well over six months old) and when he opened it up it looked like one he would have just pulled out of the refrigerator.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 08:00 PM
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double post
edit on 7/10/2012 by sad_eyed_lady because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful

However, this time, I kept track. I let the left overs pile up in there. One of them was wheat with 5 slices and the heels. Today marked the 7th week for that one.

It was soft, no mold, and smelled just as fresh as the day I opened it almot 2 months ago.


The rest of the white bread, mostly heels, were the same: soft and no mold at all......


You know, I noticed the same thing today. Had two pieces of oatmeal bread I had bought at walmart nearly a month ago. Didn't go to the store in time, was down to those two pieces, and pulled them out. Wow. No mold at all, and still soft enough to eat. Ate it, but dang, it seems like a couple of years ago it would have been green by now.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 08:10 PM
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If you take, as most do, the inner slices and leave the ends then check later, the ends dont get moldy or overly hard. At least i have never seen this happen. The inner parts get the mold. Also, Italian \ French type bread gets as hard as a rock.

And like someone else said, why complain? Old bread does not bother me. I would even just pull out the mold and eat it.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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I might risk going a bit off-topic here (if I understood the OP correctly), but I think it has something to do with the moisture within the breadbox.

My parents used to have a bread box made of clay, and bread rarely got moldy. It just went stale and became rock hard. Our bread box is made from plastic, and just a few days ago I had to toss one entire loaf because it was moist and moldy. Due to the heat these past few weeks, the bread box heated up and the moisture within the bread couldn't escape. So it just "stuck around" on the surface of the bread, and the sides of the bread box. In a clay (or wooden, in your case) bread box, the moisture can easily escape and therefore does not turn the bread moist, and soon after moldy.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


The reason why the bread was not moldy is because of the preservatives added to the bread. It is added to much of the food we buy today.



posted on Jul, 10 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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I'm eating a sandwich with bread from Target (as I'm reading this
). But It is really good, if I had the supplies I would make my own but I lack the equipment.

Great thread!


-SAP-
edit on 10-7-2012 by SloAnPainful because: (no reason given)





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