Ancient 'New York City' found in Canada

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posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 06:39 AM
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Very interesting and lots of more info as well.

Nice find, thanks for posting.




posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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Great stuff.


It reminds me of this though.


Star Wars Rebel transporter..






posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 09:47 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by pravdaseeker
 


S & F

I think the title is a bit misleading but I appreciate you bringing this to our attention.


From your source...

edit on 10-7-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)


Awesome discovery even more awesome Avatar...those stars have me mesmerized...



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 10:36 AM
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We all know people of Asian decent were the first to discover and occupy North America.

Then Vikings found Newfoundland before Columbus found America.

But, and I say this as a Danish Canadian, if you dont write books or draw maps, No one will know you discovered anything. And that goes for both the Vikings and the Natives. But obviously the Vikings saw nothing of value too take here as they were interested in objects to steal, not land.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 10:42 AM
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A lot of people were here before Columbus.

I think Columbus day is a waste of time, he didn't discover anything because people were already here.

The Vikings and the Egyptians crossed the Atlantic long before Columbus did and that leads me to believe others did as well.

Not to mention the indiginous people on these continents now known as Indians, Eskimos (wrong nomenclature?), Mexicans just to name a few.
edit on 11-7-2012 by sdocpublishing because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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Originally posted by TiM3LoRd

Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by pravdaseeker
 


S & F

I think the title is a bit misleading but I appreciate you bringing this to our attention.


From your source...

edit on 10-7-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)


Awesome discovery even more awesome Avatar...those stars have me mesmerized...

Exactly what I was thinking
on both counts.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 05:35 AM
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History is written by the victor. It is all relative since the Indians were here thousands of years before us.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by thepupils
 


The Ironic thing is Colombus aka Cristolbal Colon, didn't discover America, He "discovered" The Americas, actually landing in Mexico.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 06:45 AM
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reply to post by onecraftydude
 


The Indians!??? I would love to see an archaeological excavation dig up the remains of a curry restaurant. However I am pretty sure there were no Bengalis, or Rajastanis in the Americas prior to 1492.

Beside you do know they were only called that because the explorers were trying to open up a new trade route to India. and got confused as to who the natives where when they arrived.

You know, before all the killing and looting started.
edit on 12/7/2012 by JakiusFogg because: (no reason given)
edit on 12/7/2012 by JakiusFogg because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 07:54 AM
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Originally posted by thepupils
Looks like a Viking hall.
Most likely a scandanavian settlement. Very cool, if so this really crushes the "Columbus discovered America"
Nonsense once and for all. S&F

The photo depicts (a diorama of ) a classic Terminal Woodland Iroquois longhouse...no Vikings here. And I would concur that the title is misleading. The NYC reference is meant to capture the following description by the lead investigator Ron Williamson:

"It's the largest, most complex, cosmopolitan village of its time," link

I saw the program and it was quite good. A lovely site and I wish I had gotten a piece of it on a fine summer's day. Here's a link to an article about production of the show: link

One other interesting aspect to the project is the importance that Williamson, places upon consultation with and inclusion of representatives of the descendents of the people who lived there....which is a hallmark of his work and the new philosophy of archaeology.

What you won't know til the end is that the maddeningly familiar voice of the narrator belongs to none other than Toronto's own Robbie Robertson...part Jewish, part Mohawk. Watch the show.


Originally posted by JakiusFogg
reply to post by onecraftydude
 

The Indians!??? I would love to see an archaeological excavation dig up the remains of a curry restaurant. However I am pretty sure there were no Bengalis, or Rajastanis in the Americas prior to 1492.

I would assume that you know a lot of our indigenous people refer to themselves as Indians, eh? The folks I personally deal with prefer First Nations, but 'Indian' is not what I would call a pejorative term unless one is told otherwise. The key is that whatever terminology is used...it should be used with respect.


Originally posted by JakiusFogg
reply to post by thepupils
 
The Ironic thing is Colombus aka Cristolbal Colon, didn't discover America, He "discovered" The Americas, actually landing in Mexico.

No what's truly ironic is that he never landed in Mexico.
He didn't even hit the mainland until his third and fourth voyagers. His first landfall was actually in the Bahamas. voyages

And yes, the Vikings beat him by half a millennium.
edit on 12-7-2012 by JohnnyCanuck because: ...just because...ok?



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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I'm still looking for America.




posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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There is some evidence that Europeans reached North America during the ice age. Called the Solutrean hypotheses, it states that ancient people from southern Spain and France followed seals across the then much larger and more southerly arctic ice pack to Newfoundland, then into North America. Some projectile points found on the east coast of North America are identical to points made by the Solutreans, and are not found farther west. Also at the windover bog area in Florida preservers human remains found in a peat deposit contained what looked like European DNA, that was over 7000 years old. The Polynesians most likely reached south America. 2000 years ago. I think Columbus was one of the last of a long line of explorers.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by openminded2011
There is some evidence that Europeans reached North America during the ice age. Called the Solutrean hypotheses, it states that ancient people from southern Spain and France followed seals across the then much larger and more southerly arctic ice pack to Newfoundland, then into North America.

Indeed. Though the particulars are still being hotly contested in some academic circles (cough...David Meltzer...cough), it looks like that is the latest paradigm to be shattered in our understanding of the peopling of the Americas. I will be attending a lecture on the subject in the near future...I'll let y'all know how it goes. For those in the Trent University universe, u2u me and I'll put you on the info list.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by openminded2011
There is some evidence that Europeans reached North America during the ice age. Called the Solutrean hypotheses, it states that ancient people from southern Spain and France followed seals across the then much larger and more southerly arctic ice pack to Newfoundland, then into North America. Some projectile points found on the east coast of North America are identical to points made by the Solutreans, and are not found farther west.


Well the Soultrean and Clovis points have some similar features but differ in other regards they are not identical



Clovis tools are typified by a distinctive type of spear point, known as the Clovis point. Solutrean and Clovis points share common characteristics: points are thin and bifacial, and they share the intentional use of the "outre passé", or overshot flaking technique, which quickly reduces the thickness of a biface without reducing the width.

The Clovis blade differs from the Solutrean in that some of the former have bi-facial fluting (a long depression that occurs on a point, struck from the basal end of the point; the purpose was to better fit the point onto a spear foreshaft). Clovis tool-making technology seems to appear in the archaeological record in eastern North America roughly 13,500 years ago, and similar predecessors in Asia or Alaska, if they exist, have not been discovered.



Soultrean Hypothesis

But as the poster above noted, the matter is under intense debate and I hate to say it, but more research is needed some of which show promise...one noted below

The finds at Delmarva



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by Teye22
 


John Cabot landed in Newfoundland's Bona Vista Bay in 1497, the first European in Canada since the Vikings.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:49 PM
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All I can say is Hail Odin,

Hail Baldur

Hail Freya

Hail Thor

Just further evidence of the expansion on Vinland.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
But as the poster above noted, the matter is under intense debate and I hate to say it, but more research is needed some of which show promise...one noted below
The finds at Delmarva

This is the one that, if I recall, Meltzer particularly disputes as a 'gimme', seeing as the items were recovered some 40 years ago and there is no proof that they were actually found in any sort of real association. I put it in a similar context to a 'box of rocks' I received containing both a mammoth tooth and a partial paleo point. No telling if they share provenience. Makes me nuts.
edit on 12-7-2012 by JohnnyCanuck because: ...just because...ok?



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:23 AM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck



.......The curse of the cruel goddess we call provenance or provenience
edit on 13/7/12 by Hanslune because: ot add the other version of the word



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck

.......The curse of the cruel goddess we call provenance

Sure beats a lot of people up on this site!



posted on Jul, 13 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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The Delmarva argument has a lot of ways to go before being even closely accepted to the science community. I live on the Delmarva peninsula and would love for it to be completely true but I am holding out some doubts on this one still.




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