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Food Prices about to sky rocket, be prepared.

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posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 10:48 PM
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We've started canning and dehydrating instead if freezing. It frees up space and keeps well without power. We put up 5 quarts of chicken soup, 5 quarts of pickles and 20 pints of salsa. Next week it'll be homemade spaghetti sauce. Dehydrated onions and herbs earlier this year as well as pesto. Squash and zucchini will be sliced and dried for storage once they get bigger. In August, well plant again for the cool crops. be sure to buy organic and save your seeds. You can trade or give away what you don't need.
I'm going to build a greenhouse this fall (when it's cooler) from wooden pallets so I can get a head start next spring.
This is how it was always done before to feed your family healthy, affordable, nutritious food.
Digging in the dirt will feed your soul as weel as your belly




posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Yeah, I should not even comment to those kind of responses, just can;t help it sometimes.

Agree to all else you said.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 10:51 PM
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i only eat beans, oatmeal and mangos



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 11:58 PM
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S an F for the thread!
Thanks to everyone with helpful tips on how to do a few things it was very appreciated.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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I own land in Phillips County, Kansas that I have a local farmer lease from me. I talked to him last night. He stated that they've only gotten about 1/2 inch of rain since April, and that the normal rainfall would be around 5 to 6 inches. He said he's lost a couple crops already, and that if they don't get rain within the next few days, he'll be losing the beans on one of the areas he's growing. It's tough right now in the mid-west, especially for dry-land farmers. No rain.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 01:27 AM
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A friendly warning with reasonable evidence for their claim, and nothing but good intentions for the OP for people to be prepared. Nice thread I like it, thank you for caring about other people.

However I live in Australia so it doesn't apply to me so much - good luck Americans



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 02:44 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Who says all food prices would soar if some crops failed? Surely not all food would be affected.

More exaggerations.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by tw0330
 


i live in ontario canada and it is not looking good here crop wise ,we have no rain now for weeks and weeks



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by knightwhosaysnih
A friendly warning with reasonable evidence for their claim, and nothing but good intentions for the OP for people to be prepared. Nice thread I like it, thank you for caring about other people.

However I live in Australia so it doesn't apply to me so much - good luck Americans

This is not all about Americans. Weather disasters around the world will affect both imports/exports as well as local grown produce. Here in UK we have already lost crops due to torrential rain and flooding.
www.dailymail.co.uk...
edit on 12-7-2012 by starchild10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 07:50 AM
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Originally posted by starchild10
A friendly warning with reasonable evidence for their claim, and nothing but good intentions for the OP for people to be prepared. Nice thread I like it, thank you for caring about other people.

However I live in Australia so it doesn't apply to me so much - good luck Americans



Thank you for the comment, but I must say, if you think this is just an America and Europe problem, you would be mistaken. Prices will go up world wide.

Think about it, these companies that rely so heavily on american and European crops will need somewhere to go. Many will probably export from the countries that did have good crops this year. This will make a lot of farmers in Australia a lot of money, but will also spread out the share of crops world wide. Companies like coke a cola, will buy more and more from the non effected areas than usual, depleting your reserves used by local companies, you will have to deal with higher prices just like everyone else, though maybe not as significant.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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My family owns quite a bit of farm land here in Indiana, we chose to rent out the land in stead of doing 50/50. In the past few years it was getting frustrating seeing how much the farmer was making off of the crops, yet all I was getting was some rent money. (put it this way, he makes millions)

This year I am a little relieved to see that I will still be getting my rent money and the farmer will be taking the hit, not us. I know it seems heartless to say, but it is a risk any farmer has to take.

Most of the farmers in North west Indiana will still break even, if not make a little money, since they also have windmills on the land which the land owners get a little money from. Most of the farmers around here, though they rent land, also own some themselves.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 08:17 AM
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I'm afraid its the same situation here in North Dakota as well. We had very little snowfall this winter and as a result the winter wheat took a hey bad hit. We are also very deficit in rainfall and the crops aren't fairing too well. I've had to replant my squash, cucumbers, beans, and potatoes 3x now and the only thing that is even blooming so far is the squash and its pretty sad looking.

We haven't had extreme heat but for some reason the crops are just crap this year. Its not just mine either, everyone you talk to says the same thing, that they've had to replant and a large percentage of their crops never germinated either. I know some farmers that grow sunflower, soybean, and corn, some of whicch plant thousands of acres, that are all having issues withthere crops. Even the alfalfa is pretty bad this year which means I'm going to have to be spending more money than normal on hay for my cattle.

Even the game animals have taken a huge hit. North Dakota DNR reduced the number of deer tags by 60% this year due to the massive kill off from the last 2 winters, we haven't had an antelope season in 2 years and they say it will be at least another 3 before we do, and elk tags are reduced as well.

We are seeing a climate shift that could spell real problems, especially if next season is as bad as this one. Personally Ill survive this winter with little problems. We have about 2,000 pounds of beef in the freezer and 600 pounds of venison as well as more than plenty canned vegetables from last year and grains stored in our cellar.

I feel bad for those in urban areas like my family back home in central FL, with no means to provide their own food supplies they are going to take a big hit at the market this year. I do agree with the OP that food prices are quite possibly going to soar even higher than gasoline making things really tip close to the tipping point.
edit on 12-7-2012 by Nucleardiver because: dumbass smart ohone with its predictive text makes me spell like im an idiot



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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in the 19th century, most people grew,hunted and fished their own
Food. That was the natural order of things. Now we are dependent on agribusiness, factory food, and a supply chain of fossil fuel powered vehicles to deliver it. We are tremendously vulnerable as a result. People really need to educate themselves on how to survive a food interruption as a myriad of things could result in one. If you can, try to build a six month supply of non perishable food for each family member. Learn how to fish and garden, and learn the edible plants of your region. Have a survival plan. it will be a fatal mistake to depend on our infrastructure if there is a major collapse. I
Have been through several hurricanes and believe me, when TSHTF you will have no one to depend on but yourself. The govt comes in and saves the day mostly in the movies.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 06:03 PM
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Here's a new twist when it comes to corn crops

Drought-damaged crops can be salvaged



WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WLFI) - Farmers have the opportunity to salvage some value out of their drought-damaged corn by harvesting the crop for livestock feed. A Purdue Extension forage specialist, Keith Johnson, said the damaged corn can be harvested as whole-plant silage or green chop to help livestock producers supplement short forage supplies.


This would leave even less yields for companies that rely on corn for production of their products.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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All I can say is you know its bad when mass media is talking about it.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by daynight42
 

Well, I'm willing to bet that more processed food contains HFCS....I mean corn sugar...than you could even imagine. It's used for sweetening and stabilizing.

Most people do not realize, but a wide-ranging set of foodstuffs contains corn or some subset of it. Within a kernel are four different ingredients: starch, protein, oil, and fiber. These four components are found in a slew of products ranging from batteries to yogurt and nearly everything in between. In fact, corn can be found in roughly 3,500 common products. About a quarter of the items that can be purchased in a grocery store have some form of corn in them. Because of the vast impact of the commodity and the fact that corn touches nearly everything, it is clear that a shortage in the production of domestic corn could have very real ramifications for consumers.

wire.kapitall.com...



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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I'm going to buy more sugar and at least twenty five lbs of flour tomorrow before prices go up. Looked at the futures market yesterday and corn increased about fifty percent and soy and wheat about twenty five to thirty percent in the last month. Looks like they leveled off for a few days though. The increase will be a minimum of a couple of months. Everyone knows that when things increase they never seem to go back all the way down. Prices haven't risen yet.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by tw0330
 


Most likely salvaging a corn crop for silage would not mean less grain for market as the salvaged crop would not be expected to produce marketable grain. If livestock producers feed more fodder (silage) this may ease some pressure on the grain market.

It is a moderate drought here in Michigan. Cherries took a huge hit from the early spring. Wheat was harvested here very early and looked good. Corn that went in early looks ok but corn that was planted at a typical date for here or late is struggling. 1st cutting alfalfa came in early and was good since then ouch.


edit on 7/12/2012 by iforget because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/12/2012 by iforget because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 


Great. Nobody ever makes threads NOT complaining about HFCS and how evil it is.

There's plenty of sugarcane in Louisiana.

You can all come back and demonize me if the prices skyrocket. Until then, nobody knows what will happen.



posted on Jul, 12 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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Originally posted by daynight42
reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Who says all food prices would soar if some crops failed? Surely not all food would be affected.

More exaggerations.


You need to connect the dots. Except for whole vegetables and fruits, almost every other consumer product is a mixture of various ingredients. Corn, corn syrup, wheat, soy, sugar....and on, and on are all interconnected. When one product becomes scarce, it rises in price. Hence, every product using that item becomes more expensive. As more ingredients of more finished products become scarce...the price hikes to cover them will go through the roof.

Things are not all hunky dory like you seem to think they are. Just feeding my goats has gone up $20.00 a week. That makes my goat milk more expensive. Do you see how it works?

Des



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